127

How can i position a div to the bottom of the containing div?

<style>
.outside {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background-color: #EEE; /*to make it visible*/
}
.inside {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 2px;
}
</style>
<div class="outside">
    <div class="inside">inside</div>
</div>

This code puts the text "inside" to the bottom of the page.

2
  • 8
    .outside needs position: relative;
    – Imperative
    Commented Mar 12, 2013 at 10:26
  • relative, yes, and then it doesn't know how large it needs to be to hold the child-div content, unfortunately, so unless that is a static-value, back to the original question. How to place one div at the bottom of another div (implied: "without breaking everything").
    – JosephK
    Commented Aug 20, 2017 at 11:40

3 Answers 3

146
.outside {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background-color: #EEE; /*to make it visible*/
}

Needs to be

.outside {
    position: relative;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background-color: #EEE; /*to make it visible*/
}

Absolute positioning looks for the nearest relatively positioned parent within the DOM, if one isn't defined it will use the body.

7
  • Thanks. Can you explain why? Commented Mar 12, 2013 at 10:27
  • 39
    absolute searches for the nearest relative parent. By default it's the body of the document. So if no parent DOM object (.outside) has the property of being relative your .inside will go to to the bottom of the body tag.
    – user1467267
    Commented Mar 12, 2013 at 10:29
  • 6
    "Absolute positioning looks for the nearest relatively positioned parent within the DOM, if one isn't defined it will use the body." You just explained so much for me! Now I really start to understand CSS. THANK YOU! Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 21:22
  • Absolute actually searches for the nearest non default (= static) positioned ancestor, which is often relatively positioned. It also doesn't have to be a direct parent but can for example be a grandparent.
    – mzwaal
    Commented Jan 14, 2015 at 9:42
  • 1
    This depends on constant heights, which is VERY BAD. A simple change of font, font size, padding, margins and god knows what else demands experimentation to guess the new height.
    – Anderson
    Commented Feb 20, 2015 at 10:43
75

Assign position:relative to .outside, and then position:absolute; bottom:0; to your .inside.

Like so:

.outside {
    position:relative;
}
.inside {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
}
2
  • this could be the basis for a sticky footer couldn't it?
    – cade galt
    Commented Aug 23, 2015 at 16:12
  • 1
    I can not use position: absolute; for second div. that is my restriction, can you give me other options? Commented Jun 29, 2016 at 6:18
20

Add position: relative to .outside. (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/position)

Elements that are positioned relatively are still considered to be in the normal flow of elements in the document. In contrast, an element that is positioned absolutely is taken out of the flow and thus takes up no space when placing other elements. The absolutely positioned element is positioned relative to nearest positioned ancestor. If a positioned ancestor doesn't exist, the initial container is used.

The "initial container" would be <body>, but adding the above makes .outside positioned.

0

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