24

I want to get a specific enum based on its field value.

Enum:

public enum CrimeCategory {
    ASBO ("Anti Social Behaviour"),
    BURG ("Burglary"),
    CRIMDAM ("Criminal Damage And Arson"),
    DRUGS ("Drugs"),
    OTHTHEFT ("Other Theft"),
    PUPDISOR ("Public Disorder And Weapons"),
    ROBBERY ("Robbery"),
    SHOPLIF ("Shoplifting"),
    VEHICLE ("Vehicle Crime"),
    VIOLENT ("Violent Crime"),
    OTHER ("Other Crime");

    private  String category;


    private CrimeCategory (String category) {
        this.category = category;
    }

    public String returnString() {
        return category; 
    }
}


Getting a new Enum:

aStringRecivedFromJson = "Anti Social Behaviour"
CrimeCategory crimeCategoryEnum;
crimeCategoryEnum = CrimeCategory.valueOf(aStringRecivedFromJson); 

I have been trying to work out a way for the above bring back a an enum so it can be passed stored in a HashMap with other Crime information.

Expected Result: ASBO

2
  • 3
    toString() will give you a String representation of the Enum unless you override it. – Marvo Mar 12 '13 at 19:28
  • 1
    @Jethro fyi, you're not really 'initializing a new enum' with that sample code. You can't do that, in fact, because enums in Java are effectively singletons. You're really looking up an existing enum value. – sharakan Mar 12 '13 at 19:38
34

For reference, here is an alternative solution with a HashMap:

enum CrimeCategory {
  ASBO("Anti Social Behaviour"),
  BURG("Burglary"),
  CRIMDAM("Criminal Damage And Arson"),
  DRUGS("Drugs"),
  OTHTHEFT("Other Theft"),
  PUPDISOR("Public Disorder And Weapons"),
  ROBBERY("Robbery"),
  SHOPLIF("Shoplifting"),
  VEHICLE("Vehicle Crime"),
  VIOLENT("Violent Crime"),
  OTHER("Other Crime");

  private static final Map<String, CrimeCategory> map = new HashMap<>(values().length, 1);

  static {
    for (CrimeCategory c : values()) map.put(c.category, c);
  }

  private final String category;

  private CrimeCategory(String category) {
    this.category = category;
  }

  public static CrimeCategory of(String name) {
    CrimeCategory result = map.get(name);
    if (result == null) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid category name: " + name);
    }
    return result;
  }
}
1
  • Thank you very much for this, I am going to incorporate the HashMap if if the category value is called more often. Currently its only called when a map marker is clicked so performance is currently ok – Jethro Mar 13 '13 at 14:55
26

Add a static method to the CrimeCategory enum:

public static CrimeCategory valueOf(String name) {
    for (CrimeCategory category : values()) {
        if (category.category.equals(name)) {
            return category;
        }
    }    
    throw new IllegalArgumentException(name);
}
5
  • 5
    Or if performance is critical, a static HashMap containing the mappings can be used... – assylias Mar 12 '13 at 19:59
  • 1
    Indeed... I wasn't sure if the actual enum values are created before or after the static init block is run though, so figured I'd keep it simple. – sharakan Mar 12 '13 at 20:08
  • @sharakan Yes, self-registering fromt he enum constructor to a Map that is a static field of the enum will NPE. (Solutions: Put the static in a nested class or loop through value() in a static initialiser putting them into the map.) – Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 12 '13 at 20:30
  • @sharakan See my answer for an alternative with a HashMap - unless it is called very often it is probably not worth it. – assylias Mar 12 '13 at 20:54
  • @sharakan Thank you very much for this code. Worked perfectly. I was looking around for hours trying to find a solution :) – Jethro Mar 13 '13 at 14:52
4

Static factory methods that return an enum constant based on the value of an instance field take on one of the two forms described in the other answers: a solution based on iterating the enum values, or a solution based on a HashMap.

For enums with a small number of constants, the iterative solution should be as performant as the HashMap solution (which requires calculation of the hash code, matching it to a bucket, and assuming that there will be no hash collisions).

For larger enums, the map-based solution will be more performant (but requires storage space in memory). However, if the factory method is invoked infrequently then the overall performance improvement by using a map could still be immeasurably small.

The overall decision to use an iterative lookup or a map-based lookup for the static factory method will ultimately depend on your requirements and the environment. It is never wrong to start with an iterative lookup and then change to a map-based implementation if profiling shows an actual performance problem.

Lastly, since Java 8, the Streams API enables a pipeline-based solution for mapping (that should have performance similar to the iterative solution). For example, say that you want to create an interface that you could use on any enum class to express your intent that it should be matchable by one of its instance fields. Let's call this interface Matchable. This interface defines a method which returns the instance field on which you want to match (eg. getField()). This interface can also define a static factory method to return a constant from any implementing enum class:

interface Matchable {

    Object getField();

    public static <E extends Enum<E> & Matchable> E forToken(Class<E> cls, Object token) {

        return Stream.of(cls.getEnumConstants())
            .filter(e -> e.getField().equals(token))
            .findFirst()
            .orElseThrow(() -> new IllegalArgumentException("Unknown token '" +
                    token + "' for enum " + cls.getName()));
    }
}

Now, any enum class that you define that implements Matchable can use the Matchable.forToken() static factory method to find the enum constant whose instance field value matches the supplied parameter.

The generic type declaration E extends Enum<E> & Matchable assures that the type token passed to the method as a parameter will be for an enum class that implements Matchable (otherwise the code won't compile).

0
1

Assylias answer is great. Though I would return an Optional from the factory method to let the client deal with the situation when enum could not be found (of course throwing IllegalArgumentException might be better if you use this enum internally and you think that invoking this method with wrong argument will never happen - this is your choice).

And also I would wrap the Map into unmodifiable wrapper to not modify it somewhere by accident inside your enum (the Map is private but someone could modify it later when adding new functionalities - it will at least force to think about it) :

enum CrimeCategory {
    ASBO("Anti Social Behaviour"),
    BURG("Burglary"),
    CRIMDAM("Criminal Damage And Arson"),
    DRUGS("Drugs"),
    OTHTHEFT("Other Theft"),
    PUPDISOR("Public Disorder And Weapons"),
    ROBBERY("Robbery"),
    SHOPLIF("Shoplifting"),
    VEHICLE("Vehicle Crime"),
    VIOLENT("Violent Crime"),
    OTHER("Other Crime");

    private static final Map<String, CrimeCategory> MAP;

    static {
         Map<String, CrimeCategory> crimeCategoryMap = Arrays.stream(values())
                .collect(toMap(cg -> cg.category, e -> e));
         MAP = Collections.unmodifiableMap(crimeCategoryMap);
    }

    private final String category;

    private CrimeCategory(String category) {
        this.category = category;
    }

    public static Optional<CrimeCategory> of(final String name) {
        return Optional.ofNullable(MAP.get(name));
    }
}

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