I've got the weirdest thing happening.

Code:

NSString *input = @"357835487953487345879345897345897345897534";
NSLog(@"%@", input);
NSDecimalNumber *number = [NSDecimalNumber decimalNumberWithString:input];
NSLog(@"%@", number);

Output:

 357835487953487345879345897345897345897534
 357835487953487345879345897345897345890000

So the number's aren't the same, I it has something to do with the accuracy of floating point numbers. So what can I do to get these to be equal? Why is it replacing the last few digits with zero?

Check the documentation for NSDecimalNumber

NSDecimalNumber, an immutable subclass of NSNumber, provides an object-oriented wrapper for doing base-10 arithmetic. An instance can represent any number that can be expressed as mantissa x 10^exponent where mantissa is a decimal integer up to 38 digits long, and exponent is an integer from –128 through 127.

When I run your code they are the same until the 38th digit:

357835487953487345879345897345897345897534 357835487953487345879345897345897345890000

It is replacing the end of your number by zeroes because an NSDecimal number is limited in precision… all numbers are. So internally,

357835487953487345879345897345897345897534

is stored as

35783548795348734587934589734589734589 * 1E4

You will not have this issue with a shorter number (i.e. a number with less sygnificant digits).

From the docs:

NSDecimalNumber, an immutable subclass of NSNumber, provides an object-oriented wrapper for doing base-10 arithmetic. An instance can represent any number that can be expressed as mantissa x 10^exponent where mantissa is a decimal integer up to 38 digits long, and exponent is an integer from –128 through 127.

In short, you may need other storage solutions to hold numbers with more sygnificant digits (digits others than zeroes).

You may want to look for arbitrary precision arithmetics. Take a look at: GMP. Maybe it can help you.

  • Well, I guess that answers my question. I'm trying to get this string into a number that I can do math on (to convert it to hex) but I don't think any variables are big enough... – user688518 Mar 12 '13 at 21:48
  • 3
    No, this is the max you can get using standard variables… You may want to look for arbitrary precision arithmetics. Take a look at: gmplib.org – Jean Mar 12 '13 at 21:49

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