91

I have this Enum code:

enum Duration { Day, Week, Month };

Can I add a extension methods for this Enum?

  • 1
    Why do you want to do this? – LukeHennerley Mar 13 '13 at 14:27
  • 1
    Have you seen this?stackoverflow.com/questions/2422113/… – badpanda Mar 13 '13 at 14:27
  • 1
    Also, this. stackoverflow.com/questions/276585/… – badpanda Mar 13 '13 at 14:30
  • 1
    Using extension methods on an enum would make me feel dirty. Create a class to encapsulate what is needed. Keep an enum as simple as possible. If you need more logic associated with it, then create a Duration class that exposes day, week, month plus contains any other logic that would have been in the extension method. – Jason Evans Mar 13 '13 at 14:31
  • 1
    I like having enum extension methods for flag groups. I prefer in if clauses for instance Day.IsWorkday() over (Day & Days.Workday) > 0 with Days.Workday defined as Monday | Tuesday ... | Friday. The former is more clear in my opinion and has exactly the latter implemented. – Sebastian Werk Jul 11 '18 at 7:42
88

According to this site:

Extension methods provide a way to write methods for existing classes in a way other people on your team might actually discover and use. Given that enums are classes like any other it shouldn’t be too surprising that you can extend them, like:

enum Duration { Day, Week, Month };

static class DurationExtensions 
{
  public static DateTime From(this Duration duration, DateTime dateTime) 
  {
    switch (duration) 
    {
      case Day:   return dateTime.AddDays(1);
      case Week:  return dateTime.AddDays(7);
      case Month: return dateTime.AddMonths(1);
      default:    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("duration");
    }
  }
}

I think enums are not the best choice in general but at least this lets you centralize some of the switch/if handling and abstract them away a bit until you can do something better. Remember to check the values are in range too.

You can read more here at Microsft MSDN.

  • I believe the "enums are evil" comment is out of place but has a basis in reality. I do find that enums can be a problem is overused, as they sort of lock you in to certain contexts and behaviors. – Ed Schwehm Mar 13 '13 at 14:37
  • Enums in C# kind of suck because this compiles and runs: Duration d = 0; – Graham Mar 30 '16 at 15:32
  • 7
    Given that enums are classes no they aren't classes. – Winger Sendon Sep 2 '17 at 18:17
37

You can also add an extension method to the Enum type rather than an instance of the Enum:

/// <summary> Enum Extension Methods </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"> type of Enum </typeparam>
public class Enum<T> where T : struct, IConvertible
{
    public static int Count
    {
        get
        {
            if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
                throw new ArgumentException("T must be an enumerated type");

            return Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)).Length;
        }
    }
}

You can invoke the extension method above by doing:

var result = Enum<Duration>.Count;

It's not a true extension method. It only works because Enum<> is a different type than System.Enum.

  • Very handy, thx – Bronek Nov 24 '17 at 16:24
  • Can the class be static to ensure all its methods behave like extensions? – Jatin Sanghvi Feb 4 '18 at 1:40
  • 3
    For future readers: the name ambiguity of Enum<T> is a bit confusing. The class could also be called EnumUtils<T> and the method call would resolve to EnumUtils<Duration>.Count. – Namoshek Feb 27 at 8:02
32

Of course you can, say for example, you want to use the DescriptionAttribue on your enum values:

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

public enum Duration 
{ 
    [Description("Eight hours")]
    Day,

    [Description("Five days")]
    Week,

    [Description("Twenty-one days")] 
    Month 
}

Now you want to be able to do something like:

Duration duration = Duration.Week;
var description = duration.GetDescription(); // will return "Five days"

Your extension method GetDescription() can be written as follows:

using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Reflection;

public static string GetDescription(this Enum value)
{
    FieldInfo fieldInfo = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString());
    if (fieldInfo == null) return null;
    var attribute = (DescriptionAttribute)fieldInfo.GetCustomAttribute(typeof(DescriptionAttribute));
    return attribute.Description;
}
  • i was looking to create a extension to almost exactly what you sample did, except my use DisplayAttribute Localized GetDescription. cheers – George Dec 29 '17 at 13:41
  • This is a nice alternative, though I think the namespace is just System.ComponentModel? – TomDestry Dec 29 '18 at 16:39
22

All answers are great, but they are talking about adding extension method to a specific type of enum.

What if you want to add a method to all enums like returning an int of current value instead of explicit casting?

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    public static int ToInt<T>(this T soure) where T : IConvertible//enum
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
            throw new ArgumentException("T must be an enumerated type");

        return (int) (IConvertible) soure;
    }

    //ShawnFeatherly funtion (above answer) but as extention method
    public static int Count<T>(this T soure) where T : IConvertible//enum
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
            throw new ArgumentException("T must be an enumerated type");

        return Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)).Length;
    }
}

The trick behind IConvertible is its Inheritance Hierarchy see MDSN

Thanks to ShawnFeatherly for his answer

  • 1
    the best answer! – Marco Alves Jun 8 '17 at 1:26
  • 6
    Can you show usage, this isn't working for me. – Ryan The Leach Feb 20 '18 at 4:07
  • Ditto. It works if I call the extension directly (e.g. MyExtention.DoThing(myvalue)) but doesn't actually attach to the enum (e.g. myvalue.DoThing()) – Sinaesthetic Jul 5 at 16:56
  • FYI, C# 7.3 now supports Enum as a generic type constraint – redtetrahedron Jul 15 at 18:50
7

You can create an extension for anything, even object(although that's not considered best-practice). Understand an extension method just as a public static method. You can use whatever parameter-type you like on methods.

public static class DurationExtensions
{
  public static int CalculateDistanceBetween(this Duration first, Duration last)
  {
    //Do something here
  }
}
5

See MSDN.

public static class Extensions
{
  public static string SomeMethod(this Duration enumValue)
  {
    //Do something here
    return enumValue.ToString("D"); 
  }
}
  • 7
    A void return value on an enum is kind of weird. I'd think about a more realistic sample. – psubsee2003 Mar 13 '13 at 14:41
  • 3
    @psubsee2003 the OP surely has enough knowledge to change this to suit his needs? Why does the sample matter, it's enough to answer the initial question. – LukeHennerley Mar 13 '13 at 14:46
  • 3
    Am I the only one who finds the code examples on MSDN weird? Most of the time you need some real effort to understand what they're trying to do! – Stacked Sep 23 '16 at 7:26

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