5

Suppose I have file text.txt as below:

she likes cats, and he likes cats too.

I'd like my result to look like:

she 1
likes 2
cats 2
and 1
he 1
too 1

If putting space , . into it would make the scripts easier, that would be fine.

Is there a simple shell pipeline that could achieve this?

  • If the phrase was "One of my cats weights 500lbs, that cat's super-sized!" - is that one count of cat plus one count of cats or something else? is there a word "s" to be counted in that sentence? Is there a word "500" and a word "lbs" or a word "500lbs" or something else? Is there a word "super" and a word "sized" or a word "super-sized"? – Ed Morton Mar 14 '13 at 20:58
20

Here's a one-liner near and dear to my heart:

cat text.txt | sed 's|[,.]||g' | tr ' ' '\n' | sort | uniq -c

The sed strips punctuation (tune regex to taste), the tr puts the results one word per line.

  • You are awesome! – JackWM Mar 14 '13 at 3:31
  • 1
    Then by all means press that checkmark button. – phs Mar 14 '13 at 3:31
  • @phs +1 for good attitude! and humor. – jim mcnamara Mar 14 '13 at 3:33
  • UUOC and the sed will join "foo,bar" into one word "foobar". – Ed Morton Mar 14 '13 at 20:53
  • 1
    Fair point. Using a pattern like 's|[,.]| |g', where the replacement pattern includes whitespace, would avoid those concatenations. – phs Mar 14 '13 at 22:53
0

With GNU awk you can just specify the Record Separator (RS) to be any sequence of non-alphabetic characters:

$ gawk -v RS='[^[:alpha:]]+' '{sum[$0]++} END{for (word in sum) print word,sum[word]}' file
she 1
likes 2
and 1
too 1
he 1
cats 2

but that won't solve your problem of how to identify "words" in general.

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