2

I am aware that it's possible to emulate the maxlength property from input elements on a textarea by using this trick:

<textarea rows="5" cols="30" onkeydown="return checkLength(this)"></textarea>

<script type="text/javascript">
var maxLength = 30;

function checkLength(elem) {
  if (elem.value.length == maxLength) {
    return false;
  }
  return true;
}
</script>

By using checkLenght's return value as the return value for the onkeydown event, I'm able to effectively prevent the user from writing beyond the configured limit, as the event chain will be broken before the inputted letter appears.

I've tried the same technique using Prototype's event observers, but it didn't work. Here's a simplified version of what I tried:

<textarea rows="5" cols="30" id="myTextArea"></textarea>

<script type="text/javascript">
var maxLength = 30;

function checkLength() {
  if ($('myTextArea').value.length == maxLength)) {
    return false;
  }
  return true;
}

document.observe('dom:loaded',function(){
  $('myTextArea').observe('keydown',checkLength);
});
</script>

Apparently, this won't work because I can't break the event chain by returning false (and Event.stop() will only prevent this event from bubbling up, not stopping execution altogether).

I've workarounded this problem by checking the textarea's length on the onkeyup event and trimming its value if the limit is exceeded; but it isn't the same, as the user will see text appearing and disappearing.

Is there a way to achieve the same result?

  • Only loosely related, but I hate it when web sites do this. Much better to let the user type what they want, but give good feedback that they need to fix (shorten) it before you'll accept it. – Joel Coehoorn Oct 8 '09 at 20:40
  • Well, it's a standard in desktop applications to not let you write beyond the input's limit. The difference is that in desktop applications, you usually hear a "beep" when you try to do that. Anyway, I think most users will prefer having an immediate feedback when trying to write beyond the limit, to have to rewrite (or delete) a bunch of text already written. – Pablo Borowicz Oct 9 '09 at 14:28
3

Consider the other answers and comments. Better make a post-validation and just don't accept the post.

Nonetheless the following should work (it does in FF and IE, in Opera it doesn't. Can't be bothered to check why)

<textarea rows="5" cols="30" id="myTextArea"></textarea>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var maxLength = 30;
    Event.observe('myTextArea', 'keydown', function (event) {
        if ($('myTextArea').value.length == maxLength) {
            Event.stop(event);
            return false;
        }
    });
</script>
  • Well, it did work after all! I just forgot to set event as the argument to Event.stop(). – Pablo Borowicz Oct 9 '09 at 14:32
  • I always cringe a little when I see stop() or similar in key events. Consider the fact that, depending on browser, you're also blocking system/application keyboard commands. It's a simple check to see that, for instance, ctrl and alt are not pressed (and system is not Mac) or cmd and ctrl are not pressed (and system is Mac). Another concern is that you are preventing the user from replacing any content, by blocking the delete and backspace keys, as well as any typing that would replace selected text. – eyelidlessness Oct 9 '09 at 14:56
  • Well that's exactly why you shouldn't do this at all – jitter Oct 10 '09 at 11:10
2

Trim is not a good solution, just try this to know why

Fill the textarea, then go to the middle part and type characters

That makes a horrible effect: The typed characters are taken and then it is trimed, so end text is lost.

maxlength=21
value(with length=21): "This Is What Is Typed" then type before "What" this: "Not " you will get: "This Is Not What Is T"

Desired effect is new typed characters are ignored, rather than discarding the end text.

In the example it is very short... imagine multi-lined textarea... user will continue typing in middle without seeing the end is being discarded.

Try the same example on an input type="text" with maxlength, you will see when limit is reached new typed characters are ignored, no matter where cursor is on the text, at start, midle or end.

1

The documentation states that Event#stop stops propagation as well as prevents default action. Does it not work?

Also, binding it to keydown/keyup doesn't prevent them from pasting large amount of text in the text area.

Like Joel said in his comment, preventing users from typing may not be a good idea. It is much better to put a validation + warning (like in the comment field of Stackoverflow).

  • It did work! I forgot to set event as the argument to Event.stop(). Regarding your comment about pasting a large amount of text, I took that into account and trim the text on the keyup event. But now that I think of it, maybe I should also do that on the onclick event. – Pablo Borowicz Oct 9 '09 at 14:41
  • You can never handle all the cases. Users can add text by right-click-paste or even by selecting and dragging text from other applications. And god knows what other ways they have customized their computers to allow them to enter data (virtual keyboard for example). – Chetan Sastry Oct 9 '09 at 16:47
0

Use setInterval to periodically check state of your textarea, trim text if you want.

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