21

I am using Microsoft SQL Server 2012 and I would like to run this seemingly simple query:

SELECT 
    FirstEvent.id AS firstEventID, 
    SecondEvent.id AS secondEventID, 
    DATEDIFF(second, FirstEvent.WndFGEnd, SecondEvent.WndFGStart) AS gap, 
    FirstEvent.TitleID = SecondEvent.TitleID AS titlesSameCheck
FROM VibeFGEvents AS FirstEvent
RIGHT OUTER JOIN VibeFGEvents AS SecondEvent
ON 
    FirstEvent.intervalMode = SecondEvent.intervalMode 
    AND FirstEvent.id = SecondEvent.id - 1 
    AND FirstEvent.logID = SecondEvent.logID

However FirstEvent.TitleID = SecondEvent.TitleID AS titlesSameCheck in the SELECT clause is incorrect syntax. But the SELECT Clause (Transact-SQL) documentation includes this syntax:

SELECT [ ALL | DISTINCT ]
[ TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] [ WITH TIES ] ] 
<select_list> 
<select_list> ::= 
    { 
        * 
        | { table_name | view_name | table_alias }.* 
        | {
            [ { table_name | view_name | table_alias }. ]
                { column_name | $IDENTITY | $ROWGUID } 
            | udt_column_name [ { . | :: } { { property_name | field_name } 
            | method_name ( argument [ ,...n] ) } ]
            | expression
            [ [ AS ] column_alias ] 
            }
        | column_alias = expression 
    } [ ,...n ]

I think that means an expression is valid in the select clause and indeed the examples given include things like 1 + 2. Looking at the documentation for expressions:

{ constant | scalar_function | [ table_name. ] column | variable 
    | ( expression ) | ( scalar_subquery ) 
    | { unary_operator } expression 
    | expression { binary_operator } expression 
    | ranking_windowed_function | aggregate_windowed_function
}

boolean equality checks are valid expressions and indeed the example expression given in the = (Equals) (Transact-SQL) documentation includes one:

SELECT DepartmentID, Name
FROM HumanResources.Department
WHERE GroupName = 'Manufacturing'

albeit in the WHERE clause not the SELECT clause. It looks like I cannot use = the equality operator to compare expressions in my SELECT clause as they are being wrongly interpreted as assignment.

How do I include a Boolean equality column comparison equivalent to FirstEvent.TitleID = SecondEvent.TitleID AS titlesSameCheck in my SELECT clause?

  • 1
    Take a closer look at <select_list> definition: column_alias = expression is an alternative form of column aliasing. – Nikola Markovinović Mar 14 '13 at 13:59
  • I saw that, but I would expect the compiler to be able to distinguish aliasing from comparison. For me personally keeping them separate (aliasing using AS, assignment using =, and comparison using ==) but I guess there are historic reasons why tSQL is not clear cut like that? – dumbledad Mar 14 '13 at 14:03
30

Like this:

case when FirstEvent.TitleID = SecondEvent.TitleID then 1 else 0 end as titlesSameCheck 
14

You cannot use the Boolean type directly except in conditional statements (case, where, having, etc.)

Best way to solve your problem is to do something like

select case when x = y then 'true' else 'false' end

The bit type is probably the closest to boolean.

select CAST(case when x = y then 1 else 0 end as bit)

Of course, use whichever two values best represent what you are after.

  • I didn't down-vote but I would recommend against using string 'true'/'false'. Sql has bit(boolean) and it should be used. – Dumitrescu Bogdan Mar 14 '13 at 13:41
  • Thought of that immediately after posting, thanks! – pyrospade Mar 14 '13 at 13:45
1

As the two existing answers state, boolean values can't be returned as a column value. This is documented in the Comparison Operators section:

Unlike other SQL Server data types, a Boolean data type cannot be specified as the data type of a table column or variable, and cannot be returned in a result set.

Given that restriction, using CASE to transform the value to something that can be displayed is your best alternative.

  • +1 for pointing to where in the documentation I may actually have deduced this from; thanks Allan – dumbledad Mar 14 '13 at 13:54

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