16

I tried to iterate over hashmap in Java, which should be a fairly easy thing to do. However, the following code gives me some problems:

HashMap hm = new HashMap();

hm.put(0, "zero");
hm.put(1, "one");

Iterator iter = (Iterator) hm.keySet().iterator();

while(iter.hasNext()) {

    Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) iter.next();
    System.out.println(entry.getKey() + " - " + entry.getValue());

}

First, I needed to cast Iterator on hm.keySet().iterator(), because otherwise it said "Type mismatch: cannot convert from java.util.Iterator to Iterator". But then I get "The method hasNext() is undefined for the type Iterator", and "The method hasNext() is undefined for the type Iterator".

  • 5
    Sounds like you've imported the wrong Iterator class. You'll want to import java.util.Iterator. – FThompson Mar 15 '13 at 0:01
  • 2
    You need to loop over the entrySet() not the keySet() if you want the entires rather than the keys. – Boris the Spider Mar 15 '13 at 0:09
43

Can we see your import block? because it seems that you have imported the wrong Iterator class.

The one you should use is java.util.Iterator

To make sure, try:

java.util.Iterator iter = hm.keySet().iterator();

I personally suggest the following:

Map Declaration using Generics and declaration using the Interface Map<K,V> and instance creation using the desired implementation HashMap<K,V>

Map<Integer, String> hm = new HashMap<>();

and for the loop:

for (Integer key : hm.keySet()) {
    System.out.println("Key = " + key + " - " + hm.get(key));
}

UPDATE 3/5/2015

Found out that iterating over the Entry set will be better performance wise:

for (Map.Entry<Integer, String> entry : hm.entrySet()) {
    Integer key = entry.getKey();
    String value = entry.getValue();

}

UPDATE 10/3/2017

For Java8 and streams, your solution will be (Thanks @Shihe Zhang)

 hm.forEach((key, value) -> System.out.println(key + ": " + value))
  • 2
    Your update solution is also my favourite ;-) – zypro Sep 8 '16 at 9:57
  • Java 8 hm.forEach((key, value) -> System.out.println(key + ": " + value)) – Shihe Zhang Jun 28 at 7:18
6

You should really use generics and the enhanced for loop for this:

Map<Integer, String> hm = new HashMap<>();
hm.put(0, "zero");
hm.put(1, "one");

for (Integer key : hm.keySet()) {
    System.out.println(key);
    System.out.println(hm.get(key));
}

http://ideone.com/sx3F0K

Or the entrySet() version:

Map<Integer, String> hm = new HashMap<>();
hm.put(0, "zero");
hm.put(1, "one");

for (Map.Entry<Integer, String> e : hm.entrySet()) {
    System.out.println(e.getKey());
    System.out.println(e.getValue());
}
  • can you please specify what are the differences between the two approaches ?? – Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' May 24 '14 at 3:53
  • @HussainAkhtarWahid'Ghouri' Practically speaking none — this is why I didn't mention any. The second might be negligibly faster since you avoid the hash lookup on each iteration. (Or it might not.) – millimoose May 26 '14 at 15:32
  • What if he needs to modify his map? it will incur in concurrent modification exception. – Eduardo Naveda Aug 13 '15 at 16:14
  • @Eddnav But the OP never mentioned he does, or asked about it, and he accepted a different answer that's substantially identical to mine. Modifying the map clearly wasn't the issue in the question, as asked; if you have a problem using the Java HashMap with concurrent modification, please ask your question demonstrating that case. (Although you'll probably not run into whichever import issue caused the problem with the OP's code or something very similar.) – millimoose Aug 25 '15 at 2:20
4

With Java 8:

hm.forEach((k, v) -> {
    System.out.println("Key = " + k + " - " + v);
});
  • this is too easy with java 8 awesome – AndroidLover Apr 19 '16 at 15:28
0

Several problems here:

  • You probably don't use the correct iterator class. As others said, use import java.util.Iterator
  • If you want to use Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) iter.next(); then you need to use hm.entrySet().iterator(), not hm.keySet().iterator(). Either you iterate on the keys, or on the entries.
0
Map<String, Car> carMap = new HashMap<String, Car>(16, (float) 0.75);

// there is no iterator for Maps, but there are methods to do this.

        Set<String> keys = carMap.keySet(); // returns a set containing all the keys
        for(String c : keys)
        {

            System.out.println(c);
        }

        Collection<Car> values = carMap.values(); // returns a Collection with all the objects
        for(Car c : values)
        {
            System.out.println(c.getDiscription());
        }
        /*keySet and the values methods serve as “views” into the Map.
          The elements in the set and collection are merely references to the entries in the map, 
          so any changes made to the elements in the set or collection are reflected in the map, and vice versa.*/

        //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
        /*The entrySet method returns a Set of Map.Entry objects. 
          Entry is an inner interface in the Map interface.
          Two of the methods specified by Map.Entry are getKey and getValue.
          The getKey method returns the key and getValue returns the value.*/

        Set<Map.Entry<String, Car>> cars = carMap.entrySet(); 
        for(Map.Entry<String, Car> e : cars)
        {
            System.out.println("Keys = " + e.getKey());
            System.out.println("Values = " + e.getValue().getDiscription() + "\n");

        }
0

The cleanest way is to not (directly) use an iterator at all:

  • type your map with generics
  • use a foreach loop to iterate over the entries:

Like this:

Map<Integer, String> hm = new HashMap<Integer, String>();

hm.put(0, "zero");
hm.put(1, "one");

for (Map.Entry<Integer, String> entry : hm.entrySet()) {
    // do something with the entry
    System.out.println(entry.getKey() + " - " + entry.getValue());
    // the getters are typed:
    Integer key = entry.getKey();
    String value = entry.getValue();
}

This is way more efficient than iterating over keys, because you avoid n calls to get(key).

  • change JM to hm . i think ... correct me if i am wrong :) – Neo Aug 11 '14 at 18:08
  • @neo thx. That must have been an iPhone auto-correct :/ – Bohemian Aug 11 '14 at 22:42
0

Iterator through keySet will give you keys. You should use entrySet if you want to iterate entries.

HashMap hm = new HashMap();

hm.put(0, "zero");
hm.put(1, "one");

Iterator iter = (Iterator) hm.entrySet().iterator();

while(iter.hasNext()) {

    Map.Entry entry = (Map.Entry) iter.next();
    System.out.println(entry.getKey() + " - " + entry.getValue());

}
0

You are getting a keySet iterator on the HashMap and expecting to iterate over entries.

Correct code:

    HashMap hm = new HashMap();

    hm.put(0, "zero");
    hm.put(1, "one");

    //Here we get the keyset iterator not the Entry iterator
    Iterator iter = (Iterator) hm.keySet().iterator();

    while(iter.hasNext()) {

        //iterator's next() return an Integer that is the key
        Integer key = (Integer) iter.next();
        //already have the key, now get the value using get() method
        System.out.println(key + " - " + hm.get(key));

    }

Iterating over a HashMap using EntrySet:

     HashMap hm = new HashMap();
     hm.put(0, "zero");
     hm.put(1, "one");
     //Here we get the iterator on the entrySet
     Iterator iter = (Iterator) hm.entrySet().iterator();


     //Traversing using iterator on entry set  
     while (iter.hasNext()) {  
         Entry<Integer,String> entry = (Entry<Integer,String>) iter.next();  
         System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey() + ", Value = " + entry.getValue());  
     }  

     System.out.println();


    //Iterating using for-each construct on Entry Set
    Set<Entry<Integer, String>> entrySet = hm.entrySet();
    for (Entry<Integer, String> entry : entrySet) {  
        System.out.println("Key = " + entry.getKey() + ", Value = " + entry.getValue());  
    }           

Look at the section -Traversing Through a HashMap in the below link. java-collection-internal-hashmap and Traversing through HashMap

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