3

I developed some code on my Mac, using Wing IDE. The code i developed, which makes use of the csv module, is working, and does what I want it to on my Mac. The problem, though, is that the person I wrote it for needs to use it on Windows. I wasn't concerned about the code, as I'm not using any escape characters.

The code looks like this:

csvfile = open('file.csv', 'r')
csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter = ',')
for row in csvreader:
   thisVariable = row[0]  # <<<--------

The 'arrow' I put in above is where the error is returned at, on the Windows machine. Like I said, the code works fine on the Mac and, actually, this is pretty far down in the code that I have written. There are other CSV files read from and written to above this statement, which use similar indexing.

I would really appreciate any ideas anybody might have regarding this issue! Thanks!

  • The CSV documentation warns you to open the file in Binary mode, which you didn't do. Don't know if that would cause your error or not. – Mark Ransom Mar 15 '13 at 4:19
  • 1
    Note that the people talking about binary mode are correct for Python 2, and @shellster's advice about newline='' (and a text-mode file) is correct for Python 3. This is probably the cause of the error, but it'd be very useful in determining that if you posted the actual text/traceback of the error message. – Dougal Mar 15 '13 at 4:50
  • There are other CSV files read from and written to above this statement -- Perhaps that line is somehow empty in that particular file? – That1Guy Mar 15 '13 at 18:21
5

In Python 2

You need to open the file as a binary file:

csvfile = open('file.csv', 'rb')
csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter = ',')
for row in csvreader:
    thisVariable = row[0]

http://docs.python.org/2/library/csv.html#csv.reader


In Python 3

You need to set newline='' in your open statement:

csvfile = open('file.csv', 'r', newline='')
csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter = ',')
for row in csvreader:
    thisVariable = row[0]

http://docs.python.org/3.3/library/csv.html#csv.reader

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  • Thank you, everyone, for all of the suggestions and advice. I plan on implementing the 'test' for the bad data (using the if not row- continue). The problem was with the escape character difference between Windows and Mac (linux)- \r\n and \n. The solution was to, each time a file is read from or created and written to, include a "newline = ''" specification: open(filename, 'r', newline = '')! Thanks again, everyone! – DMML Mar 21 '13 at 23:59
0

From the docs csv.reader should be passed a file opened in binary mode.
I.e.:

csvfile = open('file.csv', 'rb')

Without seeing the input file that causes the problem I can't be sure this will fix the problem, but it is likely to cause other bugs.

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0

I can see two potential issues. First, you should be opening the file in binary mode:

csvfile = open('file.csv', 'rb')

Second, you may be dealing with having two different end of lines for two different OS's. You can avoid this by adding U after the mode:

csvfile = open('file.csv', 'rbU')

I also suggest protecting your users from bad data by testing the row. This makes the end result:

csvfile = open('file.csv', 'rbU')
csvreader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter = ',')
for row in csvreader:
   if not row:
      continue
   thisVariable = row[0]
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