In a bash script I have an IP address like 192.168.1.15 and a netmask like 255.255.0.0. I now want to calculate the start address of this network, that means using the &-operator on both addresses. In the example, the result would be 192.168.0.0. Does someone have something like this ready? I'm looking for an elegant way to deal with ip addresses from bash

  • 2
    You may consider ipcalc. – dwalter Mar 15 '13 at 10:24
  • ipcalc is a perl cgi script that can be downloaded. Thanks, that is a great source for anyone who wants to implement it in PERL. I was looking for a solution in bash though, but perl would work in a shell script, too. – Christian Mar 15 '13 at 10:36
  • 1
    no I mean the unix command line to ipcalc. see answers.oreilly.com/topic/… for more information. As an alternative you could also use sipcalc (also a cli tool) which supports IPv6 – dwalter Mar 15 '13 at 10:37
  • I would have added this as a comment if I had the rep... Usage for cevings answer... # usage: netmask #bits # eg. netmask 24 => 255.255.255.0 # usage: broadcast address mask # eg. broadcast 192.168.0.1 24 => 192.168.0.255 # usage: network address mask # eg. network 192.168.0.123 24 => 192.168.0.0 – Andrew Sharpe Apr 23 at 4:25
up vote 35 down vote accepted

Use bitwise & (AND) operator:

$ IFS=. read -r i1 i2 i3 i4 <<< "192.168.1.15"
$ IFS=. read -r m1 m2 m3 m4 <<< "255.255.0.0"
$ printf "%d.%d.%d.%d\n" "$((i1 & m1))" "$((i2 & m2))" "$((i3 & m3))" "$((i4 & m4))"
192.168.0.0

Example with another IP and mask:

$ IFS=. read -r i1 i2 i3 i4 <<< "10.0.14.97"
$ IFS=. read -r m1 m2 m3 m4 <<< "255.255.255.248"
$ printf "%d.%d.%d.%d\n" "$((i1 & m1))" "$((i2 & m2))" "$((i3 & m3))" "$((i4 & m4))"
10.0.14.96
  • 1
    Thank you so much! Exactly what I was looking for, beautiful! – Christian Mar 15 '13 at 16:18
  • 1
    This is brilliant. Thank you for taking the time to develop it. – jacksonecac Feb 28 '17 at 20:32

Some Bash functions summarizing all other answers.

ip2int()
{
    local a b c d
    { IFS=. read a b c d; } <<< $1
    echo $(((((((a << 8) | b) << 8) | c) << 8) | d))
}

int2ip()
{
    local ui32=$1; shift
    local ip n
    for n in 1 2 3 4; do
        ip=$((ui32 & 0xff))${ip:+.}$ip
        ui32=$((ui32 >> 8))
    done
    echo $ip
}

netmask()
{
    local mask=$((0xffffffff << (32 - $1))); shift
    int2ip $mask
}


broadcast()
{
    local addr=$(ip2int $1); shift
    local mask=$((0xffffffff << (32 -$1))); shift
    int2ip $((addr | ~mask))
}

network()
{
    local addr=$(ip2int $1); shift
    local mask=$((0xffffffff << (32 -$1))); shift
    int2ip $((addr & mask))
}
  • 5
    Nice but an example line would have saved me 15mins of figuring out your parameter expectations.. "network 192.168.8.1 31" or "netmask 16" – A. Binzxxxxxx May 11 '16 at 17:07

Just adding an alternative if you have only network prefix available (no netmask):

IP=10.20.30.240
PREFIX=26
IFS=. read -r i1 i2 i3 i4 <<< $IP
IFS=. read -r xx m1 m2 m3 m4 <<< $(for a in $(seq 1 32); do if [ $(((a - 1) % 8)) -eq 0 ]; then echo -n .; fi; if [ $a -le $PREFIX ]; then echo -n 1; else echo -n 0; fi; done)
printf "%d.%d.%d.%d\n" "$((i1 & (2#$m1)))" "$((i2 & (2#$m2)))" "$((i3 & (2#$m3)))" "$((i4 & (2#$m4)))"

Great answer, though minor typo in answer above.

$ printf "%d.%d.%d.%d\n" "$((i1 & m1))" "$(($i2  <-- $i2 should be i2

If anyone knows how to calculate the broadcast address (XOR the network), then calculate the usable nodes between network and broadcast I'd be interested in those next steps. I have to find addresses in a list within a /23.

  • Fixed the answer, thanks for noticing. – kamituel Aug 26 '14 at 6:36

In addition to @Janci answer

IP=10.20.30.240
PREFIX=26
IFS=. read -r i1 i2 i3 i4 <<< $IP
D2B=({0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1})
binIP=${D2B[$i1]}${D2B[$i2]}${D2B[$i3]}${D2B[$i4]}
binIP0=${binIP::$PREFIX}$(printf '0%.0s' $(seq 1 $((32-$PREFIX))))
# binIP1=${binIP::$PREFIX}$(printf '0%.0s' $(seq 1 $((31-$PREFIX))))1
echo $((2#${binIP0::8})).$((2#${binIP0:8:8})).$((2#${binIP0:16:8})).$((2#${binIP0:24:8}))

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