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I am trying to reduce 65536 elements array (calculate sum of elements in it) with help of CUDA. Kernel looks like following (please, ignore *dev_distanceFloats and index arguments for now)

__global__ void kernel_calcSum(float *d, float *dev_distanceFloats, int index) {
  int tid = threadIdx.x;
  float mySum = 0;
  for (int e = 0; e < 256; e++) {
    mySum += d[tid + e];
  }
} 

ant it launched as one block with 256 threads:

kernel_calcSum <<<1,  256 >>>(dev_spFloats1, dev_distanceFloats, index);

So far, so good, each of 256 threads takes 256 elements from global memory and calculates it's sum in local variable mySum. Kernel execution time is about 45 milliseconds. Next step is to introduce shared memory among those 256 threads in block (to calculate sum of mySum), so kernel becomes as following:

__global__ void kernel_calcSum(float *d, float *dev_distanceFloats, int index) {
  __shared__ float sdata[256];
  int tid = threadIdx.x;
  float mySum = 0;
  for (int e = 0; e < 256; e++) {
    mySum += d[tid + e];
  }
  sdata[tid] = mySum;
}  

I just added writing to shared memory, but execution time increases from 45 milliseconds to 258 milliseconds (I am cheking this with help of NVidia Visual Profiler 5.0.0). I realize that there are 8 bank conflicts for each thread when writing to sdata variable (I am on GTX670 which have capability 3.0 with 32 banks). As an experiment - I tried to reduce of threads to 32 when launching kernel - but time still 258 milliseconds.

Question 1: why writing to shared memory takes so long in my case ? Question 2: is there any tool, which show in details kinda "execution plan" (timings for memory access, conflicts, etc) ?

Thanks for your suggestions.

Update: playing with kernel - I set sdata to some constant for each thread:

__global__ void kernel_calcSum(float *d, float *dev_distanceFloats, int index) {
  __shared__ float sdata[256];
  int tid = threadIdx.x;
  float mySum = 0;
  for (int e = 0; e < 256; e++) {
    mySum += d[tid + e];
  }
  sdata[tid] = 111;
} 

and timings are back to 48 millisec. So, changing sdata[tid] = mySum; to sdata[tid] = 111; made this.

Is this compiler optimization (may be it just removed this line?) or by some reason copying from local memory (register?) to shared takes long?

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Both of your kernels do not do anything, because they do not write out results to memory that would still be accessible after the kernel finishes.

In the first case, the compiler is clever enough to notice this and optimize away the whole calculation. In the second case where shared memory is involved, the compiler does not notice this as the flow of information through shared memory would be harder to track. It thus leaves the calculation in.

Pass in a pointer to global memory (as you already do) and write out results via this pointer.

  • I see. So, as far as I am understand - in fact in first case cuda runs empty kernel (because compiler decides that result will not be used in any case) ? In second case kernel code are not empty and time increased to 258 milliseconds for memory access and other stuff which is normal, right ? – Arsen Mar 15 '13 at 11:12
  • Yes, that's right. – tera Mar 15 '13 at 11:16
  • thanks, tera! this looks to be true for me. – Arsen Mar 15 '13 at 11:22
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Shared memory is not the right thing for this. What you need are warp atomic operations, to sum up within a warp, then communicate the intermediary results between warps. There's example code demonstrating this shipping with CUDA.

Summing up elements is one of those tasks where massive parallization won't help much and the GPU in fact can be outperformed by a CPU.

  • datenwolf, thanks for your answer. I realize that reducing is not fully uncover power of parallel computing, however, this one of the steps in my algorythm :) . I inspected code from Mark Harris "Optimizing Parallel Reduction in CUDA", but in his case using shared memory did not introduce such effects. – Arsen Mar 15 '13 at 10:52

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