44

I would like to scale a Bitmap to a runtime dependant width and height, where the aspect ratio is maintained and the Bitmap fills the entire width and centers the image vertically, either cropping the excess or filling in the gap with 0 alpha pixels.

I'm currently redrawing the bitmap myself by creating a Bitmap of all 0 alpha pixels and drawing the image Bitmap on top of it, scaling to the exact specified width and maintaining the aspect ratio, however, it ends up losing/screwing up the pixel data.

Here is how I'm doing it:

Bitmap background = Bitmap.createBitmap((int)width, (int)height, Config.ARGB_8888);
float originalWidth = originalImage.getWidth(), originalHeight = originalImage.getHeight();
Canvas canvas = new Canvas(background);
float scale = width/originalWidth;
float xTranslation = 0.0f, yTranslation = (height - originalHeight * scale)/2.0f;
Matrix transformation = new Matrix();
transformation.postTranslate(xTranslation, yTranslation);
transformation.preScale(scale, scale);
canvas.drawBitmap(originalImage, transformation, null);
return background;

Is there a library out there or some better code that can do this better? I would like the image to look as crisp as possible, but I knew that my function wouldn't provide a great result.

I know I could have the image stay fine by using integer scaling, instead of float scaling, but I need the width to be 100% filled.

Also, I know about an ImageView's Gravity.CENTER_CROP capability, however, that also uses integer scaling, so it cuts off the width of the image when it shouldn't.

11 Answers 11

62

What about this:

Bitmap background = Bitmap.createBitmap((int)width, (int)height, Config.ARGB_8888);

float originalWidth = originalImage.getWidth(); 
float originalHeight = originalImage.getHeight();

Canvas canvas = new Canvas(background);

float scale = width / originalWidth;

float xTranslation = 0.0f;
float yTranslation = (height - originalHeight * scale) / 2.0f;

Matrix transformation = new Matrix();
transformation.postTranslate(xTranslation, yTranslation);
transformation.preScale(scale, scale);

Paint paint = new Paint();
paint.setFilterBitmap(true);

canvas.drawBitmap(originalImage, transformation, paint);

return background;

I added a paint to filter the scaled bitmap.

  • Well, the scale can't change, as I need the width to be filled and it can't crop the width, either. However, the paint did the trick. Thank you! Can you edit the answer to switch back to my scaling? – RileyE Mar 15 '13 at 20:19
  • 3
    but it is cropping image – Shahjahan Khan May 22 '14 at 11:06
  • This is it! Finally – GabrielBB Nov 14 '18 at 3:43
77

This will respect maxWidth and maxHeight, which means the resulting bitmap will never have dimensions larger then those:

 private static Bitmap resize(Bitmap image, int maxWidth, int maxHeight) {
    if (maxHeight > 0 && maxWidth > 0) {
        int width = image.getWidth();
        int height = image.getHeight();
        float ratioBitmap = (float) width / (float) height;
        float ratioMax = (float) maxWidth / (float) maxHeight;

        int finalWidth = maxWidth;
        int finalHeight = maxHeight;
        if (ratioMax > ratioBitmap) {
            finalWidth = (int) ((float)maxHeight * ratioBitmap);
        } else {
            finalHeight = (int) ((float)maxWidth / ratioBitmap);
        }
        image = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(image, finalWidth, finalHeight, true);
        return image;
    } else {
        return image;
    }
}
  • The answer of solution crop the image but this solution work perfect. – Arslan Oct 6 '15 at 7:16
  • @Arslan I didn't get any cropping with this method. Can you elaborate a little more. – Joshua Pinter Jun 19 '16 at 16:20
  • 4
    @JoshPinter "The accepted answer to this question caused cropping. This answer works perfectly for me as it does not cause cropping." – JakeSteam Sep 11 '16 at 11:02
  • It works perfect ... – Jay Oct 27 '17 at 8:54
  • if my width and height is 1200x1200 and my max width and height is 700x700 rationBitmap and rationMax both are 0.0 so this is a valid condition or not because then after it will be making divided by zero exception – Kishan Donga Mar 30 '18 at 12:36
22

Here I have a tested solution where I create a scaled Bitmap out of a bitmap file:

    int scaleSize =1024;

    public Bitmap resizeImageForImageView(Bitmap bitmap) {
        Bitmap resizedBitmap = null;
        int originalWidth = bitmap.getWidth();
        int originalHeight = bitmap.getHeight();
        int newWidth = -1;
        int newHeight = -1;
        float multFactor = -1.0F;
        if(originalHeight > originalWidth) {
            newHeight = scaleSize ;
            multFactor = (float) originalWidth/(float) originalHeight;
            newWidth = (int) (newHeight*multFactor);
        } else if(originalWidth > originalHeight) {
            newWidth = scaleSize ;
            multFactor = (float) originalHeight/ (float)originalWidth;
            newHeight = (int) (newWidth*multFactor);
        } else if(originalHeight == originalWidth) {
            newHeight = scaleSize ;
            newWidth = scaleSize ;
        }
        resizedBitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, newWidth, newHeight, false);
        return resizedBitmap;
    }

Notice that I need scaled Bitmaps which have a maximum size of 4096x4096 Pixels but the aspect ratio needs to be kept while resizing. If you need other values for width or height just replace the values "4096".

This is just an addition to the answer of Coen but the problem in his code is the line where he calculates the ratio. Dividing two Integers gives an Integer and if the result is < 1 it will be rounded to 0. So this throws the "divide by zero" exception.

  • 1
    I would suggest to extract the new size value to a variable or parameter to avoid repetition. Also you could initialize newWidth and newHeight with the new size value and only re-set the variable that changes to preserve the scale (also multFactor or resizedBitmap doesn't need to be pre-initialized). – AlexGuti Feb 13 '15 at 11:46
  • 1
    You are definitely right @Christopher Reichel, above code do not scale all of the sizes, just ones which have higher width than height. Thiis answer is better but the answer of @ joaomgcd is better than this because of the code optimization and method parameters. – Bahadir Tasdemir Sep 27 '15 at 14:04
16

here is a method from my Utils class, that does the job:

public static Bitmap scaleBitmapAndKeepRation(Bitmap targetBmp,int reqHeightInPixels,int reqWidthInPixels)
    {
        Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
        matrix .setRectToRect(new RectF(0, 0, targetBmp.getWidth(), targetBmp.getHeight()), new RectF(0, 0, reqWidthInPixels, reqHeightInPixels), Matrix.ScaleToFit.CENTER);
        Bitmap scaledBitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(targetBmp, 0, 0, targetBmp.getWidth(), targetBmp.getHeight(), matrix, true);
        return scaledBitmap;
    }
  • 3
    Note that this is API 17 (Jellybean) or higher only – RileyE May 4 '15 at 6:57
  • 2
    Neat !! . That was just simple . except the variable naming convention. better change TargetBmp -> targetBmp. Worked for both portrait and landscape images – Ismail Iqbal Jan 24 '17 at 7:32
6

simpler solution : note we set the width to 500 pixels

 public void scaleImageKeepAspectRatio()
    {
        int imageWidth = scaledGalleryBitmap.getWidth();
        int imageHeight = scaledGalleryBitmap.getHeight();
        int newHeight = (imageHeight * 500)/imageWidth;
        scaledGalleryBitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(scaledGalleryBitmap, 500, newHeight, false);

    }
5

It can also be done by calculating the ratio yourself, like this.

private Bitmap scaleBitmap(Bitmap bm) {
    int width = bm.getWidth();
    int height = bm.getHeight();

    Log.v("Pictures", "Width and height are " + width + "--" + height);

    if (width > height) {
        // landscape
        int ratio = width / maxWidth;
        width = maxWidth;
        height = height / ratio;
    } else if (height > width) {
        // portrait
        int ratio = height / maxHeight;
        height = maxHeight;
        width = width / ratio;
    } else {
        // square
        height = maxHeight;
        width = maxWidth;
    }

    Log.v("Pictures", "after scaling Width and height are " + width + "--" + height);

    bm = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bm, width, height, true);
    return bm;
}
  • If you downscale, ratio is 0, it throws a Exception dividing by 0 – Julien D Apr 17 '14 at 13:17
  • 6
    yeah whatever, its the solution that counts right? vultures are always ready to downvote ideas here....sigh :-) – Coen Damen Apr 18 '14 at 7:07
4

None of the above answers were worked for me and I just created a method which sets all of the dimensions into the desired ones with painting the empty area to black. Here is my method:

/**
 * Scale the image preserving the ratio
 * @param imageToScale Image to be scaled
 * @param destinationWidth Destination width after scaling
 * @param destinationHeight Destination height after scaling
 * @return New scaled bitmap preserving the ratio
 */
public static Bitmap scalePreserveRatio(Bitmap imageToScale, int destinationWidth,
        int destinationHeight) {
    if (destinationHeight > 0 && destinationWidth > 0 && imageToScale != null) {
        int width = imageToScale.getWidth();
        int height = imageToScale.getHeight();

        //Calculate the max changing amount and decide which dimension to use
        float widthRatio = (float) destinationWidth / (float) width;
        float heightRatio = (float) destinationHeight / (float) height;

        //Use the ratio that will fit the image into the desired sizes
        int finalWidth = (int)Math.floor(width * widthRatio);
        int finalHeight = (int)Math.floor(height * widthRatio);
        if (finalWidth > destinationWidth || finalHeight > destinationHeight) {
            finalWidth = (int)Math.floor(width * heightRatio);
            finalHeight = (int)Math.floor(height * heightRatio);
        }

        //Scale given bitmap to fit into the desired area
        imageToScale = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(imageToScale, finalWidth, finalHeight, true);

        //Created a bitmap with desired sizes
        Bitmap scaledImage = Bitmap.createBitmap(destinationWidth, destinationHeight, Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888);
        Canvas canvas = new Canvas(scaledImage);

        //Draw background color
        Paint paint = new Paint();
        paint.setColor(Color.BLACK);
        paint.setStyle(Paint.Style.FILL);
        canvas.drawRect(0, 0, canvas.getWidth(), canvas.getHeight(), paint);

        //Calculate the ratios and decide which part will have empty areas (width or height)
        float ratioBitmap = (float)finalWidth / (float)finalHeight;
        float destinationRatio = (float) destinationWidth / (float) destinationHeight;
        float left = ratioBitmap >= destinationRatio ? 0 : (float)(destinationWidth - finalWidth) / 2;
        float top = ratioBitmap < destinationRatio ? 0: (float)(destinationHeight - finalHeight) / 2;
        canvas.drawBitmap(imageToScale, left, top, null);

        return scaledImage;
    } else {
        return imageToScale;
    }
}

For example;

Let's say you have an image as 100 x 100 but the desired size is 300x50, then this method will convert your image to 50 x 50 and paint it into a new image which has dimensions as 300 x 50 (and empty fileds will be black).

Another example: let's say you have an image as 600 x 1000 and the desired sizes are 300 x 50 again, then your image will be converted into 30 x 50 and painted into a newly created image which has sizes as 300 x 50.

I think this is what it must be, Rs.

3

Added RESIZE_CROP to Gowrav's answer.

   enum RequestSizeOptions {
    RESIZE_FIT,
    RESIZE_INSIDE,
    RESIZE_EXACT,
    RESIZE_CENTRE_CROP
}
static Bitmap resizeBitmap(Bitmap bitmap, int reqWidth, int reqHeight, RequestSizeOptions options) {
    try {
        if (reqWidth > 0 && reqHeight > 0 && (options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_FIT ||
                options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_INSIDE ||
                options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_EXACT || options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_CENTRE_CROP)) {

            Bitmap resized = null;
            if (options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_EXACT) {
                resized = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, reqWidth, reqHeight, false);
            } else {
                int width = bitmap.getWidth();
                int height = bitmap.getHeight();
                float scale = Math.max(width / (float) reqWidth, height / (float) reqHeight);
                if (scale > 1 || options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_FIT) {
                    resized = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, (int) (width / scale), (int) (height / scale), false);
                }
                if (scale > 1 || options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_CENTRE_CROP) {
                    int smaller_side = (height-width)>0?width:height;
                    int half_smaller_side = smaller_side/2;
                    Rect initialRect = new Rect(0,0,width,height);
                    Rect finalRect = new Rect(initialRect.centerX()-half_smaller_side,initialRect.centerY()-half_smaller_side,
                            initialRect.centerX()+half_smaller_side,initialRect.centerY()+half_smaller_side);
                    bitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(bitmap,  finalRect.left, finalRect.top, finalRect.width(), finalRect.height(), null, true);
                    //keep in mind we have square as request for cropping, otherwise - it is useless
                    resized = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, reqWidth, reqHeight, false);
                }

            }
            if (resized != null) {
                if (resized != bitmap) {
                    bitmap.recycle();
                }
                return resized;
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        Log.w("AIC", "Failed to resize cropped image, return bitmap before resize", e);
    }
    return bitmap;
}
2
public static Bitmap scaleBitmap(Bitmap bitmap, int wantedWidth, int wantedHeight) {
    float originalWidth = bitmap.getWidth();
    float originalHeight = bitmap.getHeight();
    Bitmap output = Bitmap.createBitmap(wantedWidth, wantedHeight, Config.ARGB_8888);
    Canvas canvas = new Canvas(output);
    Matrix m = new Matrix();

    float scalex = wantedWidth/originalWidth;
    float scaley = wantedHeight/originalHeight;
    float xTranslation = 0.0f, yTranslation = (wantedHeight - originalHeight * scaley)/2.0f;

    m.postTranslate(xTranslation, yTranslation);
    m.preScale(scalex, scaley);
    // m.setScale((float) wantedWidth / bitmap.getWidth(), (float) wantedHeight / bitmap.getHeight());
    Paint paint = new Paint();
    paint.setFilterBitmap(true);
    canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap, m, paint);

    return output;
}
2

This is an awesome library from ArthurHub to handle the image crops both programmatically and interactively if you don't want to reinvent the wheel.

But if you prefer a non bloated version like me.., the internal function shown here is a rather sophisticated to perform Image Scaling with few standard options

/**
 * Resize the given bitmap to the given width/height by the given option.<br>
 */

enum RequestSizeOptions {
    RESIZE_FIT,
    RESIZE_INSIDE,
    RESIZE_EXACT
}

static Bitmap resizeBitmap(Bitmap bitmap, int reqWidth, int reqHeight, RequestSizeOptions options) {
    try {
        if (reqWidth > 0 && reqHeight > 0 && (options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_FIT ||
                options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_INSIDE ||
                options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_EXACT)) {

            Bitmap resized = null;
            if (options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_EXACT) {
                resized = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, reqWidth, reqHeight, false);
            } else {
                int width = bitmap.getWidth();
                int height = bitmap.getHeight();
                float scale = Math.max(width / (float) reqWidth, height / (float) reqHeight);
                if (scale > 1 || options == RequestSizeOptions.RESIZE_FIT) {
                    resized = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(bitmap, (int) (width / scale), (int) (height / scale), false);
                }
            }
            if (resized != null) {
                if (resized != bitmap) {
                    bitmap.recycle();
                }
                return resized;
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        Log.w("AIC", "Failed to resize cropped image, return bitmap before resize", e);
    }
    return bitmap;
}
1

My solution was this, which maintains aspect ratio, and requires only one size, for example if you have a 1920*1080 and an 1080*1920 image and you want to resize it to 1280, the first will be 1280*720 and the second will be 720*1280

public static Bitmap resizeBitmap(final Bitmap temp, final int size) {
        if (size > 0) {
            int width = temp.getWidth();
            int height = temp.getHeight();
            float ratioBitmap = (float) width / (float) height;
            int finalWidth = size;
            int finalHeight = size;
            if (ratioBitmap < 1) {
                finalWidth = (int) ((float) size * ratioBitmap);
            } else {
                finalHeight = (int) ((float) size / ratioBitmap);
            }
            return Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(temp, finalWidth, finalHeight, true);
        } else {
            return temp;
        }
    }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.