I have a file that contains information in two columns:

box1 a1
box2 a2

I'm trying to read this file line by line into read and have each line items be put into a variable.

On the first pass, $a would contain box1 and $b would contain a1.

On the second pass, $a would contain box2 and $b would contain a2, etc.

An example of the code that I am using to try to achieve is this:

for i in text.txt; do
    while read line; do
        echo $line | read a b;
    done < text.txt;
    echo $a $b;
done

This gives me the following results:

box1 a1 box2 a2

When I expected the following results:

box1 a1
box2 a1

How can I fix this?

Piping into a read command causes the variables to be set in a subshell, which makes them inaccessible (indeed, they are gone) to the rest of your code. In this case, though, you don't even need the for loop or the second read command:

while read -r a b; do
    echo $a $b
done < text.txt
  • Bingo! That worked like a charm.. Thank you for the explanation, it cleared things up for me. (@chepner and @Dave Jarvis.. Thank you!) – mlebel Mar 15 '13 at 22:44
  • If you can have ` in your input, do not forget to use the -r` argument to read. – jfg956 Mar 16 '13 at 1:29
  • @jfgagne, I researched -r and I found the following in oracle docs - "By default, unless the -r option is specified, backslash (\) acts as an escape character." is this what you meant? – mlebel Mar 16 '13 at 23:53
  • @mlebel: yes, you need to use -r, because if you have an input line like box1 foo\nbar without -r you will loose the ``. – jfg956 Mar 17 '13 at 10:28
  • 1
    @snapfractalpop: you are right, the text was mangled. The original texts were: If you can have <backslash> in your input, do not forget to use the -r argument to read and yes, you need to use -r, because if you have an input line like box1 foo<backslash>nbar without -r you will loose the <backslash> with backticks around <backslash> and -r for the formatting of the comments. The general rule here is that if you use read, you probably need -r. With and without -r, the following will give different results: echo "box1 foo<backslash>nbar" | { read -r txt; echo "$txt"; }. – jfg956 Mar 4 '14 at 20:08

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.