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Just want to make simple extension for syntactic sygar :

public static bool IsNotEmpty(this ICollection obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}

public static bool IsNotEmpty<T>(this ICollection<T> obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}

It works perfectly when I work with some collections, but when working with others I get

The call is ambiguous between the following methods or properties: 'PowerOn.ExtensionsBasic.IsNotEmpty(System.Collections.IList)' and 'PowerOn.ExtensionsBasic.IsNotEmpty(System.Collections.Generic.ICollection)'

Is there any canonical solution to this problem ?

No, I don't want to perform a cast before calling this method ;)

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Can you cite a collection that has this problem, so we can verify our answers? –  Marc Gravell Oct 9 '09 at 15:29
1  
Are you sure those are the declarations? The error message seems to suggest it's IList rather than ICollection. –  Jon Skeet Oct 9 '09 at 15:32
2  
Is the second method even necessary? –  Dave Oct 9 '09 at 15:40
1  
This is particulary needed when working with interfaces (when you do not know the concrete type of the instance you are working with) : ICollection<T> does not implement ICollection... –  Mose Oct 12 '09 at 10:18
1  
@Jon Skeet: that's because List<T> implements both ICollection and IList<T>, while IList<T> inherits ICollection<T>. So List<T> implements both ICollection and ICollection<T>. –  Roman Boiko Nov 24 '09 at 20:45

2 Answers 2

It's because some collections implements both interfaces, You should convert collection to concrete interface like this

((ICollection)myList).IsNotEmpty();

Or

((ICollection<int>)myIntList).IsNotEmpty();

And yea, you will get NullReferanceException if obj == null so you can remove null check ;) which mean that your extension method just compares Count whith 0 which you can do without extension method ;)

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All of the generic versions implement their non-generic counterparts, so any generic class would have both. –  Rex M Oct 9 '09 at 15:37
    
yea, and may be he get this error on generic versions –  Arsen Mkrtchyan Oct 9 '09 at 15:39
1  
Like I said in the last sentence of my question, I don't want to perform a cast before the call. This is for SYNTACTIC SUGAR, if I need to add a cast, then it's definitely useless :p My question remains : any way to solve ambiguity to work on all collections ? –  Mose Oct 12 '09 at 8:06
1  
@ArsenMkrt: extension methods can be called on variables with value == null, exception will not occur –  Roman Boiko Nov 24 '09 at 20:34
    
@Rex M: did you mean all generic classes from .NET Framework implement non-generic interfaces? Is there any link to documentation? –  Roman Boiko Nov 24 '09 at 20:36
up vote 3 down vote accepted

My best way to solve the ambiguity : define an overload for all common non-generic ICollection classes. That means custom ICollection won't be compatible, but it's no big deal as generics are becoming the norme.

Here is the whole code :

/// <summary>
/// Check the given array is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this Array obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Length > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given ArrayList is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this ArrayList obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given BitArray is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this BitArray obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given CollectionBase is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this CollectionBase obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given DictionaryBase is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this DictionaryBase obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given Hashtable is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this Hashtable obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given Queue is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this Queue obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given ReadOnlyCollectionBase is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this ReadOnlyCollectionBase obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given SortedList is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this SortedList obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given Stack is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty(this Stack obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}
/// <summary>
/// Check the given generic is empty or not
/// </summary>
public static bool IsNotEmpty<T>(this ICollection<T> obj)
{
    return ((obj != null)
        && (obj.Count > 0));
}

Note that I did not want it to work on IEnumerable<T>, because Count() is a method that can trigger a database request if you are working with Linq-to-Entity or Linq-to-SQL.

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1  
After a few weeks using it, it is DEFINITELY the best solution, we mass-adopted it here. –  Mose Nov 26 '09 at 10:47

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