5

I'm currently working on a basic four in a row game for myself, but I'm rather stuck at the logic behind it.

Currently I have this multi-dimensional array that represents the board

[
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
]

0 would represent an empty slot, while 1 and 2 represent a player. So let's say after a while you get this array:

[
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 0],
    [0, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2, 0]
]

How can I write the logic to check if there are four in a row? Calculating it for horizontal and vertical ones seem rather easy (although still figuring out the best way), but how would I do this for diagonal lines?

  • 3
    Just like you would do it horizontally or vertically, but you'll increment/decrement both coordinates instead of just one. – user529758 Mar 17 '13 at 5:24
  • @H2CO3 one could even go further with the editing/tagging and make it entirely language agnostic... I was thinking about doing that. – Till Mar 17 '13 at 5:43
  • @Till Yeah, that's reasonable too. – user529758 Mar 17 '13 at 5:44
  • You might find some inspiration from implementations of the Game of Life which has to perform similar spatial pattern-checking on a 2D array. (btw, if you drop the commas above, it becomes valid PostScript code. :) – luser droog Mar 17 '13 at 7:36
13

Best bet is to probably divide the search space into four:

  • vertical;
  • horizontal;
  • right and down;
  • right and up.

then limit your starting and ending coordinates based on the direction.

For example, let's say your array is board[row=0-5][col=0-6] with board[0][0] at the top left.

First vertical (loops are inclusive at both ends in this pseudo-code):

for row = 0 to 2:
    for col = 0 to 6:
        if board[row][col] != 0 and
           board[row][col] == board[row+1][col] and
           board[row][col] == board[row+2][col] and
           board[row][col] == board[row+3][col]:
               return board[row][col]

This limits the possibilities to only those that don't extend off the edge of the board, a problem most solutions have when they simplistically start by checking each cell and going out in all directions from there. By that, I mean there's no point checking a start row of 3, simply because that would involve rows 3, 4, 5 and 6 (the latter which does not exist).

Similarly, for horizontal:

for row = 0 to 5:
    for col = 0 to 3:
        if board[row][col] != 0 and
           board[row][col] == board[row][col+1] and
           board[row][col] == board[row][col+2] and
           board[row][col] == board[row][col+3]:
               return board[row][col]

For right and down, followed by right and up:

for row = 0 to 2:
    for col = 0 to 3:
        if board[row][col] != 0 and
           board[row][col] == board[row+1][col+1] and
           board[row][col] == board[row+2][col+2] and
           board[row][col] == board[row+3][col+3]:
               return board[row][col]

for row = 3 to 5:
    for col = 0 to 3:
        if board[row][col] != 0 and
           board[row][col] == board[row-1][col+1] and
           board[row][col] == board[row-2][col+2] and
           board[row][col] == board[row-3][col+3]:
               return board[row][col]

Now, you could actually combine those two by making for col = 0 to 3 the outer loop and only doing it once rather than twice but I actually prefer to keep them separate (with suitable comments) so that it's easier to understand. However, if you're addicted to performance, you can try:

for col = 0 to 3:
    for row = 0 to 2:
        if board[row][col] != 0 and
           board[row][col] == board[row+1][col+1] and
           board[row][col] == board[row+2][col+2] and
           board[row][col] == board[row+3][col+3]:
               return board[row][col]
    for row = 3 to 5:
        if board[row][col] != 0 and
           board[row][col] == board[row-1][col+1] and
           board[row][col] == board[row-2][col+2] and
           board[row][col] == board[row-3][col+3]:
               return board[row][col]

Then, if no wins were found in the four possible directions, simply return 0 instead of the winner 1 or 2.

So, for example, your sample board:

row
 0   [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
 1   [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
 2   [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0]
 3   [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0]
 4   [0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 0]
 5 > [0, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2, 0]
         ^
      0  1  2  3  4  5  6 <- col

would detect a winner in the right and up loop where the starting cell was {5,1} because {5,1}, {4,2}, {3,3} and {2,4} are all set to 1.

  • Amazing, that really helped a lot! – woutr_be Mar 17 '13 at 12:00
2

I had developed four in a row game some time back. Here is the code snippet to check for winning condition that is four in a row condition : (This is in C language)

int checkWinOrLose(int grid[][7],int result,int rowNum) {
//  For checking whether any win or lose condition is reached. Returns 1 if win or lose is reached. else returns 0
//  grid[][] is the 6X7 matrix
//  result is the column number where the last coin was placed
//  rowNum is the row number where the last coin was placed

    int player=grid[rowNum][result];
    if(rowNum<=2 && grid[rowNum+1][result]==player && grid[rowNum+2][result]==player && grid[rowNum+3][result]==player) // 4 in a row vertically
        return 1;
    else {
        int count=1,i,j;
        for(i=result+1;i<7;i++) { // 4 in a row horizontally
            if(grid[rowNum][i]!=player)
                break;
            count++;
        }
        for(i=result-1;i>=0;i--) { // 4 in a row horizontally
            if(grid[rowNum][i]!=player)
                break;
            count++;
        }
        if(count>=4)
            return 1;
        count=1;
        for(i=result+1,j=rowNum+1;i<7 && j<6;i++,j++) { // 4 in a row diagonally
            if(grid[j][i]!=player)
                break;
            count++;
        }
        for(i=result-1,j=rowNum-1;i>=0 && j>=0;i--,j--) { // 4 in a row diagonally
            if(grid[j][i]!=player)
                break;
            count++;
        }
        if(count>=4)
            return 1;
        count=1;
        for(i=result+1,j=rowNum-1;i<7 && j>=0;i++,j--) { // 4 in a row diagonally
            if(grid[j][i]!=player)
                break;
            count++;
        }
        for(i=result-1,j=rowNum+1;i>=0 && j<6;i--,j++) { // 4 in a row diagonally
            if(grid[j][i]!=player)
                break;
            count++;
        }
        if(count>=4)
            return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

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