I have the following two lines of code:

On Error Resume Next
myWorkbook.Sheets("x").Columns("D:T").AutoFit

I've stepped into the macro and executed the line On Error Resume Next and then on the next line myWorkbook... it does the following:

enter image description here

Why doesn't the compiler resume the next line of code?

On Error has been liberally used throughout the procedures code; I realize best practice is to use this as little as possible but it seems to fit the purpose of this macro.

Reading this SO QUESTION it says that you can't have one set of error trapping within another. How can I guarantee that one set of error trapping has been "closed off" before the code moves on - does On Error Goto 0 reset the error trapping? If it does reset then why doesn't resume work in the following?:

Sub GetAction()
Dim WB As Workbook
Set WB = ThisWorkbook

On Error GoTo endbit:
'raise an error
Err.Raise 69
Exit Sub
endbit:
On Error GoTo 0

On Error Resume Next
WB.Sheets("x").Columns("D:T").AutoFit

End Sub
  • Can we pls see the full code? – brettdj Mar 17 '13 at 9:52
  • @brettdj all 500 lines! – whytheq Mar 17 '13 at 10:29
  • @brettdj do you think I need to make sure all other error trapping in the previous code is closed off? – whytheq Mar 17 '13 at 10:30
  • Yes :) I think you already have an error. – brettdj Mar 17 '13 at 10:31
  • @Remou - Re.your edit: isn't this error code common to all VBA implementations? – whytheq Mar 17 '13 at 12:30
up vote 3 down vote accepted

An example of an error when the initial error is not closed out.

Sub GetAction()
Dim WB As Workbook
Set WB = ThisWorkbook
On Error GoTo endbit:
'raise an error
Err.Raise 69
Exit Sub
endbit:
On Error Resume Next
WB.Sheets("x").Columns("D:T").AutoFit
End Sub
  • If I add On Error GoTo 0 after the line endbit: the resume still does not work !! Does that mean that @grahamj42 answer is wrong? – whytheq Mar 17 '13 at 15:01

There is also a VBA setting that will cause On Error ... statements to be ignored and that dialog box to always appear. See this answer for more details on checking/changing the option: https://stackoverflow.com/a/3440789/381588

  • ? as you can see from the screenprint the error is not being ignored. But On Error Resume Next is seemingly getting ignored. – whytheq Mar 17 '13 at 11:05
  • @whytheq When the error trapping setting is set to "Break on All Errors" - the error dialog will show up for all errors, even if there is an active error handler, which seems to be exactly what you're experiencing. – Iridium Mar 17 '13 at 12:04
  • 2
    thanks worth bearing in mind - but it's not on that setting - its on Break on All Unhandled Errors – whytheq Mar 17 '13 at 12:29

As you have found, within the same function or subroutine, On Error Resume Next doesn't override On Error Goto ... if it's still active.

You are correct that On Error Goto 0 restores the default error handler.

There are some cases where On Error is the most appropriate way to handle an exceptional condition. I prefer to use the following structure:

On Error Resume Next

statement which might fail

On Error Goto 0

if statement has failed then ...

This keeps everything together, but in other cases a generic error handler at the end of the procedure can be better.

  • +1 thanks - almost worth using On Error Resume Next / On Error Goto 0 like brackets around code; to be safe. – whytheq Mar 17 '13 at 11:06

I've found that in functions/subs that iterates over nested objects, errorhandling might be a drag in VBA. A solution that works for me to better handle complex iterations is separating setting of objects in their own functions, e.g.

main function/sub: set FSOfolder = SetFSOFolder(FSOobject, strFolder)

Private Function SetFSOFolder(FSO as scripting.FileSystemObject, strFolder as string) as Scripting.Folder
    on error resume Next
    set SetFSOFolder = FSO.GetFolder(strFolder)
    on error goto 0
End Function

and then in the next line in main function:

if (not fsofolder is nothing) then

I agree using On Error Resume Next is not best practice but most/many of my Access apps are not overly sensitive to minor nuances in data integrity (i.e. analytical or reporting, not transactions and not audited). For this reason I use OERN quite often because VBA is very sensitive to some situations that you cannot anticipate entirely. 1 - will the error cause data corruption. If yes handle it. Many routines I use are just crunching a large volume of records and there may be errors in imported data that haven't been fixed. Usually I have a lot of conversion processes that will let the system clean up its own data eventually.

2 - is the error frequent and non-critical (ie not a key). If yes it's OERN otherwise the error may not be predicable and you end up crashing out or have to write a bunch of I-T-E or Select Case logic to trap it.

Don't use On Error Resume Next instead write code that shouldn't crash.

Note: I am being careful how I phrase that because you never guaranty code doesn't crash. But if you use On Error Resume Next then part of the natural flow of your code is for it to crash, which is wrong, big time wrong.

  • VBA wasn't design to deal with all 'risky' situation without On Error Resume Next. What about Application.Inputbox cancel button... So, wishful thinking. But, after all I agree with you :) – Kazimierz Jawor Mar 20 '13 at 18:35
  • Try-Catch-Finally wouldn't have been asking too much within VBA ! – whytheq Mar 21 '13 at 8:32
  • 5
    +1 @user1644564 agree with your answer but On Error Resume Next has been created for a reason - if it should never be used then why did then include it in the VBA spec? – whytheq Mar 21 '13 at 8:34

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