144

I have some CSS that on hover, a CSS transition effect will moves a div.

The problem, as you can see in the example, is that the translate transition has the horrible side effect of making the image in the div move by 1px down/right (and possibly resize ever so slightly?) so that it appears out of place and out of focus...

The glitch seems to apply the whole time the hover effect is applied, and from a process of trial and error I can safely say only seems to occur when the translate transition moves the div (box shadow and opacity are also applied but make no difference to the error when removed).

The problem only seems to happen when the page has scrollbars. So the example with just one instance of the div is fine, but once more identical divs are added and the page therefore requires a scrollbar the problem strikes again...

  • 5
    Post the code here. – MattDiamant Mar 17 '13 at 17:49
  • 1
    I'm on Chrome 27 on OSX, and it's fine. I believe that when the content gets put into a layer it gets turned into a bitmap during the animation, and that on older versions/older graphics cards this doesn't look great. Try a newer version and see if it's fixed. – Rich Bradshaw Mar 17 '13 at 17:52
  • Everything fine on Chrome 25 OS X. BTW: I'd suggest a different approach for the background gradient texture than a 300KB image! – Paolo Mar 17 '13 at 17:54
  • And thanks @Paolo - the background image was for the demonstration only, it's not the image in use on the actual site! – Lewis Mar 17 '13 at 18:13
  • 2
    The problem arise when the animation is handled by the GPU, looks like the bitmap roundings are a little bit off. Is reproduced in Canary, but it works ok if you turn off GPU acceleration – vals Mar 17 '13 at 22:34

12 Answers 12

243

Have you tried this in CSS?

.yourDivClass {
    /* ... */

    -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden;
    -webkit-transform: translateZ(0) scale(1.0, 1.0);
}

What this does is it makes the division to behave "more 2D".

  • Backface is drawn as a default to allow flipping things with rotate and such. There's no need to that if you only move left, right, up, down, scale or rotate (counter-)clockwise.
  • Translate Z-axis to always have a zero value.

Edit

Chrome now handles backface-visibility and transform without the -webkit- prefix. I currently don't know how this affects other browsers rendering (FF, IE), so use the non-prefixed versions with caution.

  • 27
    Might not have explained anything but it explained enough to fix this problem for me. – McNab Mar 28 '13 at 23:07
  • 2
    Is it just me or does this just give it a permanent blur? – cameronjonesweb May 4 '15 at 23:53
  • 1
    i suggest this solution stackoverflow.com/a/42256897/1834212 im posting the link to avoid duplication – Miguel Feb 15 '17 at 18:33
  • 1
    Can someone confirm if this still work, because whenever I add ` -webkit-backface-visibility` and -webkit-transform, I can't really see a change, and when I open chromes developer console. I see those 2 css properties are stroked through, as if they are overwritten, but they are not (empty css and html). It's as if chrome no longer accepts them. – Kevin M Mar 16 '17 at 15:55
  • 1
    @KevinM try without the -webkit- prefixes, these are now standard CSS. – sampoh Mar 30 '17 at 12:26
89

You need to apply 3d transform to the element, so it will get its own composite layer. For instance:

.element{
    -webkit-transform: translateZ(0);
    transform: translateZ(0);
}

or

.element{
    -webkit-transform: translate3d(0,0,0);
    transform: translate3d(0,0,0);
}

More about layer creation criteria you can read right here: Accelerated Rendering in Chrome


An explanation:

Examples (hover green box):

When you use any transition on your element it cause browser to recalculate styles, then re-layout your content even if transition property is visual (in my examples it is an opacity) and finaly paint an element:

screenshot

The issue here is re-layout of the content that can make an effect of "dancing" or "blinking" elements on the page while transition happens. If you will go to settings, check "Show composite layers" checkbox and then apply 3d transform to an element, you will see that it gets it's own layer which outlined with orange border.

screenshot

After element gets its own layer, browser just needs to composite layers on transition without re-layout or even paint operations so problem have to be solved:

screenshot

  • nice stuff! got a point cause of how detailed your answer was! which software you using for screen capturing / arrowing ? – kroe Dec 3 '13 at 18:21
  • monosnap.com – sol0mka Dec 7 '13 at 14:03
  • Spot on mate!! Saved me a lot of hassle there. – user1017882 Mar 10 '14 at 11:02
  • This did the trick for me. At first I was using translateZ on the parent that I was animating, but the background-image sprites within were still blurry. I am using Velocity.js to scale yet another container within it and applied something like translateZ: 0.000001 (some infinitesimal #) and voila! Sharp background-images once again! – notacouch Nov 6 '15 at 16:27
  • 2
    This used to work but not anymore.. – OZZIE Apr 18 '18 at 7:51
41

Had the same problem with embeded youtube iframe (Translations were used for centering iframe element). None of the solutions above worked until tried reset css filters and magic happened.

Structure:

<div class="translate">
     <iframe/>
</div>

Style [before]

.translate {
  transform: translateX(-50%);
  -webkit-transform: translateX(-50%);
}

Style [after]

.translate {
  transform: translateX(-50%);
  -webkit-transform: translateX(-50%);
  filter: blur(0);
  -webkit-filter: blur(0);
}
  • 9
    filter: blur(0) did it for me! – Nick Sep 8 '15 at 7:06
  • 1
    -webkit-filter: blur(0); - this did it! Thanks man! – Greg Dec 15 '15 at 10:16
  • Yeah, filter with translateZ(0) works for me. – aksu Dec 23 '15 at 16:29
  • 3
    Unbelievable O_o WTF with the blur ? Why's it on by default? – Yuriy Polezhayev Jan 29 '16 at 18:44
  • This was the solution for me too. The accepted answer could work for people that aren't using other "translate" functions in their transform properties, but it wasn't working for me. – Edward Coyle Jr. Feb 18 '16 at 20:52
32

I recommended an experimental new attribute CSS I tested on latest browser and it's good:

image-rendering: optimizeSpeed;             /*                     */
image-rendering: -moz-crisp-edges;          /* Firefox             */
image-rendering: -o-crisp-edges;            /* Opera               */
image-rendering: -webkit-optimize-contrast; /* Chrome (and Safari) */
image-rendering: optimize-contrast;         /* CSS3 Proposed       */
-ms-interpolation-mode: nearest-neighbor;   /* IE8+                */

With this the browser will know the algorithm for rendering

  • This fixed my blurry rotated images while backface-visibility, blur(0), translateZ did not work for me. Thank you. – Louis Ameline Sep 11 '15 at 9:52
  • Fixed images in some use cases, made it horribly worse in some others :-) Interesting in any case! – Simon Steinberger Nov 2 '15 at 23:40
  • Digged in deeper: image-rendering: -webkit-optimize-contrast; solves the issue on Chrome. However, images on other browsers, e.g. Firefox, get rendered much, much worse with the rendering option set. Therefore, I only use the WebKit directive, which also works on the Blink engine. Thanks! – Simon Steinberger Nov 2 '15 at 23:51
  • In some cases it causes the images to be noticeably jaggy. Can't seem to find a sweet-spot in between the blurrier result and this one ~sigh~ – bigp Jan 8 '16 at 22:26
  • Thanks this one worked for me. – Malith Aug 1 '16 at 7:19
4

Just found another reason why an element goes blurry when being transformed. I was using transform: translate3d(-5.5px, -18px, 0); to re-position an element once it had been loaded in, however that element became blurry.

I tried all the suggestions above but it turned out that it was due to me using a decimal value for one of the translate values. Whole numbers don't cause the blur, and the further away I went from the whole number the worse the blur became.

i.e. 5.5px blurs the element the most, 5.1px the least.

Just thought I'd chuck this here in case it helps anybody.

  • Thanks, this was the issue in my case - I was using translateY(-50%) which must have been evaluating to a decimal pixel value. – b4tch Feb 14 '18 at 17:33
3

I cheated problem using transition by steps, not smoothly

transition-timing-function: steps(10, end);

It is not a solving, it is a cheating and can not be applied everywhere.

I can't explain it, but it works for me. None of another answers helps me (OSX, Chrome 63, Non-Retina display).

https://jsfiddle.net/tuzae6a9/6/

  • In your fiddle is shaking like Parkinson's, but in my case worked. – Tárcio Zemel Feb 3 '18 at 13:05
2

Scaling to double and bringing down to half with zoom worked for me.

transform: scale(2);
zoom: 0.5;
  • for me it worked scale .5 and zoom 2 – TeT Psy Sep 5 '16 at 10:26
  • It doesn't work on Firefox – kris_IV Oct 6 '17 at 9:42
  • this does seem to work in chrome for images. unfortunately it also modifies any html you put it around too. – Jack Davidson May 2 at 18:36
2

I've tried around 10 possibly solutions. Mixed them up and they still didn't work correctly. There was always 1px shake at the end.

I find solution by reducing transition time on filter.

This didn't work:

.elem {
  filter: blur(0);
  transition: filter 1.2s ease;
}
.elem:hover {
  filter: blur(7px);
}

Solution:

.elem {
  filter: blur(0);
  transition: filter .7s ease;
}
.elem:hover {
  filter: blur(7px);
}

Try this in fiddle:

.blur {
  border: none;
  outline: none;
  width: 100px; height: 100px;
  background: #f0f;
  margin: 30px;
  -webkit-filter: blur(10px);
  transition: all .7s ease-out;
  /* transition: all .2s ease-out; */
}
.blur:hover {
  -webkit-filter: blur(0);
}

.blur2 {
  border: none;
  outline: none;
  width: 100px; height: 100px;
  background: tomato;
  margin: 30px;
  -webkit-filter: blur(10px);
  transition: all .2s ease-out;
}
.blur2:hover {
  -webkit-filter: blur(0);
}
<div class="blur"></div>

<div class="blur2"></div>

I hope this helps someone.

1

Try filter: blur(0);

It worked for me

  • Worked for me too, Chrome 63, 64, and Vivaldi 1.13 – GTCrais Jan 27 '18 at 13:11
  • in my case this trick did not work :( – user2520818 Nov 29 '18 at 15:34
1

For me, now in 2018. The only thing that fixed my problem (a white glitchy-flicker line running through an image on hover) was applying this to my link element holding the image element that has transform: scale(1.05)

a {
   -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden;
   backface-visibility: hidden;
   -webkit-transform: translateZ(0) scale(1.0, 1.0);
   transform: translateZ(0) scale(1.0, 1.0);
   -webkit-filter: blur(0);
   filter: blur(0);
}
a > .imageElement {
   transition: transform 3s ease-in-out;
}
  • Yes! 'blur(0)' fixes it for me in Chrome. Makes the image very slightly blurry on resize though but is less noticeable than the jump / resize – 00-BBB May 16 at 13:34
0
filter: blur(0)
transition: filter .3s ease-out
transition-timing-function: steps(3, end) // add this string with steps equal duration

I was helped by setting the value of transition duration .3s equal transition timing steps .3s

-6

Just got the same problem. Try to set position:relative to parent element, that worked for me.

  • 5
    Do you have a demo of this working? I have no idea how this would help – Zach Saucier Nov 9 '14 at 1:21
  • 2
    If you could please edit your answer and explain what the code you're showing does, and why/how that code answers the question, it could really help. Code blocks on their own are not usually useful answers. – Lea Cohen Feb 12 '15 at 1:20

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