39

I was browsing Google Code when I chanced upon this project called JSpeed - optimization for Javascript.

I noticed one of the optimization was to change i++ to ++i in for loop statements.

Before Optimization

for (i=0;i<1;i++) {}

for (var i = 0, j = 0; i < 1000000; i++, j++) {
    if (i == 4) {
        var tmp = i / 2;
    }

    if ((i % 2) == 0) {
        var tmp = i / 2;
        i++;
    }
}
var arr = new Array(1000000);
for (i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {}

After optimization

for(var i=0;i<1;++i){}
for(var i=0,j=0;i<1000000;++i,++j){if(i==4){var tmp=i>>1;}
if((i&1)==0){var tmp=i>>1;i++;}}
var arr=new Array(1000000);for(var i=0,arr_len=arr.length;i<arr_len;++i){}

I know what pre and post increments do, but any idea how does this speeds the code up?

8
  • 97
    Does optimization mean squeezing all the code together to make it unreadable? Genius! – ChaosPandion Oct 10 '09 at 3:47
  • 1
    nope. optimization is actually to improve and speed up certain parts of the code making it efficient and less CPU-costing. squeezing code together making it unreadable might be also called packing or minifying - and that is not necessary optimization, since it takes time to unpack. – mauris Oct 10 '09 at 4:45
  • 7
    Since when does parser doesn't need to unpack anything? The optimization here is transport, not performance. – Justin Johnson Oct 10 '09 at 8:26
  • 1
    This is also true in many other languages/compilers. – bgw Dec 12 '09 at 22:53
  • 2
    There is actually an optimization, the divisions by 2 have been replaced by a right shit operation. – mins Sep 12 '16 at 11:34
60

This is what I read and could answer your question: "preincrement (++i) adds one to the value of i, then returns i; in contrast, i++ returns i then adds one to it, which in theory results in the creation of a temporary variable storing the value of i before the increment operation was applied".

4
58

This is a faux optimization. As far as I understand it, you're saving 1 op code. If you're looking to optimize your code with this technique, then you've gone the wrong way. Also, most compilers/interpreters will optimize this for you anyway (reference 1). In short I wouldn't worry about. But, if you're really worried, you should use i+=1.

Here's the quick-and-dirty benchmark I just did

var MAX = 1000000, t=0,i=0;

t = (new Date()).getTime();
for ( i=0; i<MAX;i++ ) {}
t = (new Date()).getTime() - t;

console.log(t);

t = (new Date()).getTime();
for ( i=0; i<MAX;++i ) {}
t = (new Date()).getTime() - t;

console.log(t);

t = (new Date()).getTime();
for ( i=0; i<MAX;i+=1 ) {}
t = (new Date()).getTime() - t;

console.log(t);

Raw results

Post    Pre     +=
1071    1073    1060
1065    1048    1051
1070    1065    1060
1090    1070    1060
1070    1063    1068
1066    1060    1064
1053    1063    1054

Removed lowest and highest

Post    Pre     +=
1071    ----    1060
1065    ----    ----
1070    1065    1060
----    1070    1060
1070    1063    ----
1066    1060    1064
----    1063    1054

Averages

1068.4  1064.2  1059.6

Notice that this is over one million iterations and the results are within 9 milliseconds on average. Not really much of an optimization considering that most iterative processing in JavaScript is done over much smaller sets (DOM containers for example).

4
  • to fill up the 15 characters minimum. anyway, 1 op * n iterations can be a lot. – mauris Oct 12 '09 at 7:37
  • 9
    My point was that the difference is negligible and can't really be differentiated in smaller datasets (<1000), which is more common in JavaScript than larger data sets. Typically, datasets that are iterated over in JavaScript are DOM collections, which are typically under 200 members. Even still, the bottle neck in these situations is the DOM, not the minimal optimization of pre vs post vs += – Justin Johnson Oct 12 '09 at 9:38
  • 1
    @mauris - "1 op * n iterations can be a lot" only if considered absolutely; in any real code it will be only a tiny part of the entire loop and so when looked at relatively to the whole operation will be negligible. a 9 ms difference on a loop that takes 1s means it is not important – simpleuser Dec 4 '15 at 13:27
  • I don't think this is good enough evidence to say i += 1 is any better. The numbers are too close - better to check the bytecode as Sylvian Leroux did. – Timmmm Jan 27 '20 at 10:19
7

In theory, using a post-increment operator may produce a temporary. In practice, JavaScript compilers are smart enough to avoid that, especially in such trivial case.

For example, let's consider that sample code:

sh$ cat test.js 
function preInc(){
  for(i=0; i < 10; ++i)
    console.log(i);
}

function postInc(){
  for(i=0; i < 10; i++)
    console.log(i);
}

// force lazy compilation
preInc();
postInc();

In that case, the V8 compiler in NodeJS produces exactly the same bytecode (look esp. at opcodes 39-44 for the increment):

sh$ node --version
v8.9.4
sh$ node --print-bytecode test.js | sed -nEe '/(pre|post)Inc/,/^\[/p'
[generating bytecode for function: preInc]
Parameter count 1
Frame size 24
   77 E> 0x1d4ea44cdad6 @    0 : 91                StackCheck 
   87 S> 0x1d4ea44cdad7 @    1 : 02                LdaZero 
   88 E> 0x1d4ea44cdad8 @    2 : 0c 00 03          StaGlobalSloppy [0], [3]
   94 S> 0x1d4ea44cdadb @    5 : 0a 00 05          LdaGlobal [0], [5]
         0x1d4ea44cdade @    8 : 1e fa             Star r0
         0x1d4ea44cdae0 @   10 : 03 0a             LdaSmi [10]
   94 E> 0x1d4ea44cdae2 @   12 : 5b fa 07          TestLessThan r0, [7]
         0x1d4ea44cdae5 @   15 : 86 23             JumpIfFalse [35] (0x1d4ea44cdb08 @ 50)
   83 E> 0x1d4ea44cdae7 @   17 : 91                StackCheck 
  109 S> 0x1d4ea44cdae8 @   18 : 0a 01 0d          LdaGlobal [1], [13]
         0x1d4ea44cdaeb @   21 : 1e f9             Star r1
  117 E> 0x1d4ea44cdaed @   23 : 20 f9 02 0f       LdaNamedProperty r1, [2], [15]
         0x1d4ea44cdaf1 @   27 : 1e fa             Star r0
  121 E> 0x1d4ea44cdaf3 @   29 : 0a 00 05          LdaGlobal [0], [5]
         0x1d4ea44cdaf6 @   32 : 1e f8             Star r2
  117 E> 0x1d4ea44cdaf8 @   34 : 4c fa f9 f8 0b    CallProperty1 r0, r1, r2, [11]
  102 S> 0x1d4ea44cdafd @   39 : 0a 00 05          LdaGlobal [0], [5]
         0x1d4ea44cdb00 @   42 : 41 0a             Inc [10]
  102 E> 0x1d4ea44cdb02 @   44 : 0c 00 08          StaGlobalSloppy [0], [8]
         0x1d4ea44cdb05 @   47 : 77 2a 00          JumpLoop [42], [0] (0x1d4ea44cdadb @ 5)
         0x1d4ea44cdb08 @   50 : 04                LdaUndefined 
  125 S> 0x1d4ea44cdb09 @   51 : 95                Return 
Constant pool (size = 3)
Handler Table (size = 16)
[generating bytecode for function: get]
[generating bytecode for function: postInc]
Parameter count 1
Frame size 24
  144 E> 0x1d4ea44d821e @    0 : 91                StackCheck 
  154 S> 0x1d4ea44d821f @    1 : 02                LdaZero 
  155 E> 0x1d4ea44d8220 @    2 : 0c 00 03          StaGlobalSloppy [0], [3]
  161 S> 0x1d4ea44d8223 @    5 : 0a 00 05          LdaGlobal [0], [5]
         0x1d4ea44d8226 @    8 : 1e fa             Star r0
         0x1d4ea44d8228 @   10 : 03 0a             LdaSmi [10]
  161 E> 0x1d4ea44d822a @   12 : 5b fa 07          TestLessThan r0, [7]
         0x1d4ea44d822d @   15 : 86 23             JumpIfFalse [35] (0x1d4ea44d8250 @ 50)
  150 E> 0x1d4ea44d822f @   17 : 91                StackCheck 
  176 S> 0x1d4ea44d8230 @   18 : 0a 01 0d          LdaGlobal [1], [13]
         0x1d4ea44d8233 @   21 : 1e f9             Star r1
  184 E> 0x1d4ea44d8235 @   23 : 20 f9 02 0f       LdaNamedProperty r1, [2], [15]
         0x1d4ea44d8239 @   27 : 1e fa             Star r0
  188 E> 0x1d4ea44d823b @   29 : 0a 00 05          LdaGlobal [0], [5]
         0x1d4ea44d823e @   32 : 1e f8             Star r2
  184 E> 0x1d4ea44d8240 @   34 : 4c fa f9 f8 0b    CallProperty1 r0, r1, r2, [11]
  168 S> 0x1d4ea44d8245 @   39 : 0a 00 05          LdaGlobal [0], [5]
         0x1d4ea44d8248 @   42 : 41 0a             Inc [10]
  168 E> 0x1d4ea44d824a @   44 : 0c 00 08          StaGlobalSloppy [0], [8]
         0x1d4ea44d824d @   47 : 77 2a 00          JumpLoop [42], [0] (0x1d4ea44d8223 @ 5)
         0x1d4ea44d8250 @   50 : 04                LdaUndefined 
  192 S> 0x1d4ea44d8251 @   51 : 95                Return 
Constant pool (size = 3)
Handler Table (size = 16)

Of course, other JavaScript compilers/interpreters may do otherwise, but this is doubtful.

As the last word, for what it worth, I nevertheless consider as a best practice to use pre-increment when possible: since I frequently switch languages, I prefer using the syntax with the correct semantic for what I want, instead of relying on compiler smartness. For example, modern C compilers won't make any difference either. But in C++, this can have a significant impact with overloaded operator++.

3

Sounds like premature optimization. When you're nearly done your app, check where the bottlenecks are and optimize those as needed. But if you want a thorough guide to loop performance, check this out:

http://blogs.oracle.com/greimer/entry/best_way_to_code_a

But you never know when this will become obsolete because of JS engine improvements and variations between browsers. Best choice is to not worry about it until it's a problem. Make your code clear to read.

Edit: According to this guy the pre vs. post is statistically insignificant. (with pre possibly being worse)

3
  • it's more of the increment part rather than the way to access arrays. i know how for(i=0;i<arr.length;i++) can slow down the code (each iteration calls arr.length) - but not how pre and post increment – mauris Oct 10 '09 at 4:01
  • 1
    I don't see anything in your link that discusses pre vs post increment. – Taylor Leese Oct 10 '09 at 4:02
  • Ha! I'm blind. There's no pre vs post in my link. Checking for a proper reference now. – Glenn Oct 10 '09 at 4:07
2

The optimization isn't the pre versus post increment. It's the use of bitwise 'shift' and 'and' operators rather than divide and mod.

There is also the optimization of minifying the javascript to decrease the total size (but this is not a runtime optimization).

5
  • 1
    There is some evidence that pre vs. post does make a difference...depending on the engine. – Glenn Oct 10 '09 at 3:53
  • 1
    Can you provide a source? That doesn't make much sense to me. – Taylor Leese Oct 10 '09 at 3:55
  • i know there are other optimizations as well. but if this is not considered part of optimization then why does JSpeed bother including this changing post to pre increment? – mauris Oct 10 '09 at 3:56
  • 1
    The link doesn't reference anything about pre vs. post increment. – Taylor Leese Oct 10 '09 at 4:03
  • Yeah. My mistake. Ignore most of what I've said. I have foggy memories of reading some tests where it did make a difference. – Glenn Oct 10 '09 at 4:12
2

Anatoliy's test included a post-increment inside the pre-increment test function :(

Here are the results without this side effect...

function test_post() {
    console.time('postIncrement');
    var i = 1000000, x = 0;
    do x++; while(i--);
    console.timeEnd('postIncrement');
}

function test_pre() {
    console.time('preIncrement');
    var i = 1000000, x = 0;
    do ++x; while(--i);
    console.timeEnd('preIncrement');
}

test_post();
test_pre();
test_post();
test_pre();
test_post();
test_pre();
test_post();
test_pre();

Output

postIncrement: 3.21ms
preIncrement: 2.4ms
postIncrement: 3.03ms
preIncrement: 2.3ms
postIncrement: 2.53ms
preIncrement: 1.93ms
postIncrement: 2.54ms
preIncrement: 1.9ms

That's a big difference.

2
  • I think the reason those are different is because while(i--) has to save the value of i, then decrement i, then examine the prior value of i to decide if the loop is finished. while(--i) does not have to do that extra work. It's very unusual to use i-- or i++ in a conditional test. Certainly in the increment operation of a for statement, but not in a conditional test. – Mike Dunlavey Jul 31 '14 at 13:38
  • When you use --i, you should set it to 1000001, because it will end up earlier :) But of course, it's not a big difference. – Elvedin Hamzagic Jan 21 '15 at 22:52
1

This is probably cargo-cult programming. It shouldn't make a difference when you're using a decent compilers/interpreters for languages that don't have arbitrary operator overloading.

This optimization made sense for C++ where

T x = ...;
++x

could modify a value in place whereas

T x = ...;
x++

would have to create a copy by doing something under-the-hood like

T x = ...;
T copy;
(copy = T(x), ++x, copy)

which could be expensive for large struct types or for types that do lots of computation in their `copy constructor.

0

Just tested it in firebug and found no difference between post- and preincrements. Maybe this optimization other platforms? Here is my code for firebug testing:

function test_post() {
    console.time('postIncrement');
    var i = 1000000, x = 0;
    do x++; while(i--);
    console.timeEnd('postIncrement');
}

function test_pre() {
    console.time('preIncrement');
    var i = 1000000, x = 0;
    do ++x; while(i--);
    console.timeEnd('preIncrement');
}

test_post();
test_pre();
test_post();
test_pre();
test_post();
test_pre();
test_post();
test_pre();

Output is:

postIncrement: 140ms
preIncrement: 160ms
postIncrement: 136ms
preIncrement: 157ms
postIncrement: 148ms
preIncrement: 137ms
postIncrement: 136ms
preIncrement: 148ms
4
  • i've already done the test on firefox. doesn't have much diff as well. theory given on the other answer might be just the answer. thanks for the effort! – mauris Oct 10 '09 at 7:21
  • Who cares speed wise. Unless you JavaScript is doing zillions it's nit going to be noticable by the end user. – mP. Oct 10 '09 at 7:29
  • @mP - agreed. but some browsers coughIE... =D – mauris Oct 10 '09 at 7:56
  • @mP. maybe now with Node.js… – moala Apr 21 '13 at 21:13
0

Using post increment causes stack overflow. Why? start and end would always return the same value without first incrementing

function reverseString(string = [],start = 0,end = string.length - 1) {  
  if(start >= end) return
  let temp = string[start]
  string[start] = string[end]
  string[end] = temp
  //dont't do this
  //reverseString(string,start++,end--)
  reverseString(string,++start,--end)
  return array
}

let array = ["H","a","n","n","a","h"]
console.log(reverseString(array))

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