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When I run git ls-remote in the work tree, the command outputs a list of revisions in the origin repo. For some reason I get 2 revisions with every tag and for the second revision of the same tag, the tag name includes ^{}

git ls-remote
From git@github.com:andris9/zzzzzz.git
d69e66d7c915b9682618b7f304b80cc0ae4c7809    HEAD
....
bb944682f7f65272137de74ed18605e49257356c    refs/tags/v0.1.6
771a930dc0ba86769d6862bc4dc100acc50170fa    refs/tags/v0.1.6^{}
a72251d945353a360087eb78ee75287c38a1c0e6    refs/tags/v0.1.7
d69e66d7c915b9682618b7f304b80cc0ae4c7809    refs/tags/v0.1.7^{}

I create tags with

git tag -a v0.1.8 -m "tag message"
git push --tags

From the examples of git-ls-remote man page there are no such duplicate tags, so maybe I'm doing something wrong?

marked as duplicate by manojlds, Craig Swing, Frank Schmitt, Mike Dimmick, Bojangles Mar 18 '13 at 11:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 84 down vote accepted

There are 2 types of tags - lightweight and annotated. Lightweight tags are merely refs that point to some object whereas annotated tags are a separate git object by themselves, and store a lot more information like author, committer, a commit message, etc.

When you used git tag -a to create a tag, git would have created an annotated tag for you.

The ^{} is the syntax used to dereference a tag. It is described in gitrevisions.

  • When used with tag objects, git would recursively dereference the tag until it finds a non-tag object.

  • When used with non-tag objects, it doesn't do anything and is equivalent to skipping the ^{}

The refs/tags/v0.1.6 ref in your repository points to the tag object bb944682f7f65272137de74ed18605e49257356c, which in turn points to 771a930dc0ba86769d6862bc4dc100acc50170fa (a non-tag object) which I'm guesssing is storing the commit information when you created the tag.

So when you do refs/tags/v0.1.6^{}, git is going to dereference the tag and resolve it to 771a930dc0ba86769d6862bc4dc100acc50170fa - the non-tag object.

There is also a git show-ref command that can be used to list only tags, and optionally dereference as follows, and in your case should produce the following output:

$ git show-ref --tags
bb944682f7f65272137de74ed18605e49257356c    refs/tags/v0.1.6
a72251d945353a360087eb78ee75287c38a1c0e6    refs/tags/v0.1.7

$ git show-ref --tags --dereference
bb944682f7f65272137de74ed18605e49257356c    refs/tags/v0.1.6
771a930dc0ba86769d6862bc4dc100acc50170fa    refs/tags/v0.1.6^{}
a72251d945353a360087eb78ee75287c38a1c0e6    refs/tags/v0.1.7
d69e66d7c915b9682618b7f304b80cc0ae4c7809    refs/tags/v0.1.7^{}

To confirm this, you can use git show command to give you more details about the git object.

This is the information from one of my test git repositories.

$ git show 43f9a98886ba873c0468c608f24c408b9991414f
tag v0.1
Tagger: Ash <tuxdude@OptimusPrime>
Date:   Sun Jul 15 00:14:43 2012 -0700

Tagging Stable repo 0.1 :)
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
<PGP-SIGNATURE>
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

commit e55df25f2321a6b2c9a02fa80ccba7cbe3c38c08
Merge: 796efcd 58e3a4d
Author: Ash <tuxdude@OptimusPrime>
Date:   Sun Jul 15 00:02:44 2012 -0700

    Merge branch 'dev' into 'master' for stable 0.1.

$ git show e55df25f2321a6b2c9a02fa80ccba7cbe3c38c08
commit e55df25f2321a6b2c9a02fa80ccba7cbe3c38c08
Merge: 796efcd 58e3a4d
Author: Ash <tuxdude@OptimusPrime>
Date:   Sun Jul 15 00:02:44 2012 -0700

    Merge branch 'dev' into 'master' for stable 0.1.
  • Great explanation, thanks a lot! – Andris Mar 18 '13 at 9:09
  • 5
    This explanation is better than the one given in the duplicated question! – pedromanoel Jul 2 '14 at 14:22

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