337
int[] x = new int [] { 1, 2, 3};
int[] y = new int [] { 4, 5 };

int[] z = // your answer here...

Debug.Assert(z.SequenceEqual(new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }));

Right now I use

int[] z = x.Concat(y).ToArray();

Is there an easier or more efficient method?

4
  • 8
    What do you mean by "efficient"? The code is short enough as it is, so I assume you mean efficient in terms of CPU/RAM?
    – TToni
    Oct 10, 2009 at 7:04
  • 4
    No, a quick look with Reflector shows that it uses a double-when-full buffer
    – erikkallen
    Oct 10, 2009 at 10:24
  • Just be clear I need z to be a of type int[].
    – hwiechers
    Oct 11, 2009 at 10:56
  • 5
    I'm not really that concerned about efficiency. (I did say easier or more efficient.) I asked the question to check how other people were handling this common task.
    – hwiechers
    Oct 11, 2009 at 10:58

24 Answers 24

401
var z = new int[x.Length + y.Length];
x.CopyTo(z, 0);
y.CopyTo(z, x.Length);
9
  • 11
    @manthrax -> In its defense, C# tends to favor lists which are much more powerful than arrays. It seems the only functional purpose for using arrays is for Interop calls (Unmanaged C++). Oct 26, 2015 at 22:40
  • 1
    @LeviFuller Another place where C# uses array is with variable-number params parameters.
    – ChrisW
    Jan 2, 2016 at 13:33
  • 3
    @LeviFuller - it's odd that many system routines return arrays instead of lists. eg System.IO.Directory.GetFiles() returns an array of strings. Jan 7, 2016 at 17:55
  • 9
    This is not odd. An Array is immutable, a list isnt. Also a List uses more memory than an array, unless TrimExcess is called (which doesnt happen in ToList)
    – CSharpie
    Nov 9, 2016 at 11:54
  • 3
    Also array is faster than list when accessing data, because list just wraps array inside and has overhead for calling indexer.
    – C0DEF52
    May 26, 2018 at 22:15
107

Try this:

List<int> list = new List<int>();
list.AddRange(x);
list.AddRange(y);
int[] z = list.ToArray();
13
  • 7
    Or even List<int> list = new List<int>(x); Oct 10, 2009 at 7:04
  • 10
    How is that more efficient than x.Concat(y)? It works and all, I'm just wondering if there is something that makes it better?
    – Mike Two
    Oct 10, 2009 at 7:07
  • 13
    you might want to make the first line List<int> list = new List<int>(x.Length + y.Length); To avoid the resize that might happen as you call AddRange
    – Mike Two
    Oct 10, 2009 at 7:09
  • 7
    @Mathew Scharley. The question is asking for a more efficient solution. I know the title makes it sound like any old combination will do but the full question goes beyond that. Reading some of the answers I just feel some people are answering the title. So I thought that this answer should probably mention efficiency if it deserves the upvotes since that seemed to be the point of the question.
    – Mike Two
    Oct 10, 2009 at 7:22
  • 2
    turns out that the AddRange is actually quite an expensive process, so the first answer on this board should be the prefered approach: dotnetperls.com/insertrange
    – Liam
    Jul 25, 2012 at 16:38
60

You could write an extension method:

public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] x, T[] y)
{
    if (x == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("x");
    if (y == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("y");
    int oldLen = x.Length;
    Array.Resize<T>(ref x, x.Length + y.Length);
    Array.Copy(y, 0, x, oldLen, y.Length);
    return x;
}

Then:

int[] x = {1,2,3}, y = {4,5};
int[] z = x.Concat(y); // {1,2,3,4,5}
5
  • 1
    Isn't there already an extension method that works on any IEnumerable?
    – Mike Two
    Oct 10, 2009 at 7:17
  • 2
    Yes, and I'd use that happily for most cases. But they have lots of overheads. It depends; 98% of the time the overheads are fine. If you are in the 2%, though, then some direct memcopy/array work is handy. Oct 10, 2009 at 7:21
  • 1
    @nawfal, how is Copy faster than CopyTo? Care to elaborate?
    – skrebbel
    Nov 23, 2012 at 12:35
  • 1
    @skrebbel mine was an inaccurate comment. I did some testing back then and I found Copy faster. But now it seems they are just equal. What I might have found back then could be that overall the Marc's approach is more efficient since he is passing the same instance back while in Zed's approach he is creating a new array. Apologies :)
    – nawfal
    Nov 23, 2012 at 13:07
  • 1
    @Shimmy It would not. Inside this method x is but a local variable, passing x as a ref to the resize method would create a new array and alter (the local variable) x to point to it. Or to rephrase: x passed into the resize and x inside the extension method is the same variable, but x is not passed into the extension method as a ref, so x is a different variable than the variable in the scope this extension was called from.
    – AnorZaken
    Feb 5, 2015 at 20:34
45

This is it:

using System.Linq;

int[] array1 = { 1, 3, 5 };
int[] array2 = { 0, 2, 4 };

// Concatenate array1 and array2.
var result1 = array1.Concat(array2);
7
  • 11
    You mean int[] result = array1.ToList().Concat(array2.ToList()).toArray(); You cannot apply Concat on arrays directly I believe Oct 21, 2014 at 19:57
  • 5
    This solution -- z = x.Concat(y) -- is mentioned in the original question above. Feb 20, 2015 at 19:32
  • 2
    This is what happens without the toArray() Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<string>' to 'string[]'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?) Jun 16, 2015 at 11:32
  • 4
    This is not a direct answer. OP asked for int[] result = ?, you are hiding the problem of your answer behind your var in that your result will be IEnumerable<int>, not int[]. (one of the reasons why I don't like var on method returns)
    – David S.
    Nov 30, 2016 at 14:33
  • 2
    This method is what is used in the question so this answer provides no new info, and without the .ToArray() call, this code will not return an actual array so it's also an incorrect answer. Dec 10, 2016 at 14:52
43

I settled on a more general-purpose solution that allows concatenating an arbitrary set of one-dimensional arrays of the same type. (I was concatenating 3+ at a time.)

My function:

    public static T[] ConcatArrays<T>(params T[][] list)
    {
        var result = new T[list.Sum(a => a.Length)];
        int offset = 0;
        for (int x = 0; x < list.Length; x++)
        {
            list[x].CopyTo(result, offset);
            offset += list[x].Length;
        }
        return result;
    }

And usage:

        int[] a = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };
        int[] b = new int[] { 4, 5, 6 };
        int[] c = new int[] { 7, 8 };
        var y = ConcatArrays(a, b, c); //Results in int[] {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8}
1
  • Nice function, thanks! Changed params T[][] to this T[][] to make it an extension.
    – Mark
    Oct 10, 2012 at 19:14
12

I know the OP was only mildly curious about performance. That larger arrays may get a different result (see @kurdishTree). And that it usually does not matter (@jordan.peoples). None the less, I was curious and therefore lost my mind ( as @TigerShark was explaining).... I mean that I wrote a simple test based on the original question.... and all the answers....

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace concat
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[] x = new int [] { 1, 2, 3};
            int[] y = new int [] { 4, 5 };


            int itter = 50000;
            Console.WriteLine("test iterations: {0}", itter);

            DateTime startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for(int  i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z;
                z = x.Concat(y).ToArray();
            }
            Console.WriteLine ("Concat Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks );

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for(int  i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                var vz = new int[x.Length + y.Length];
                x.CopyTo(vz, 0);
                y.CopyTo(vz, x.Length);
            }
            Console.WriteLine ("CopyTo Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks );

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for(int  i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                List<int> list = new List<int>();
                list.AddRange(x);
                list.AddRange(y);
                int[] z = list.ToArray();
            }
            Console.WriteLine("list.AddRange Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.Concat(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Concat(x, y) Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.ConcatArrays(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("ConcatArrays Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.SSConcat(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("SSConcat Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int k = 0; k < itter; k++)
            {
                int[] three = new int[x.Length + y.Length];

                int idx = 0;

                for (int i = 0; i < x.Length; i++)
                    three[idx++] = x[i];
                for (int j = 0; j < y.Length; j++)
                    three[idx++] = y[j];
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Roll your own Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);


            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.ConcatArraysLinq(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("ConcatArraysLinq Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] z = Methods.ConcatArraysLambda(x, y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("ConcatArraysLambda Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                List<int> targetList = new List<int>(x);
                targetList.Concat(y);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("targetList.Concat(y) Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);

            startTest = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < itter; i++)
            {
                int[] result = x.ToList().Concat(y.ToList()).ToArray();
            }
            Console.WriteLine("x.ToList().Concat(y.ToList()).ToArray() Test Time in ticks: {0}", (DateTime.Now - startTest).Ticks);
        }
    }
    static class Methods
    {
        public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] x, T[] y)
        {
            if (x == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("x");
            if (y == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("y");
            int oldLen = x.Length;
            Array.Resize<T>(ref x, x.Length + y.Length);
            Array.Copy(y, 0, x, oldLen, y.Length);
            return x;
        }

        public static T[] ConcatArrays<T>(params T[][] list)
        {
            var result = new T[list.Sum(a => a.Length)];
            int offset = 0;
            for (int x = 0; x < list.Length; x++)
            {
                list[x].CopyTo(result, offset);
                offset += list[x].Length;
            }
            return result;
        }


        public static T[] SSConcat<T>(this T[] first, params T[][] arrays)
        {
            int length = first.Length;
            foreach (T[] array in arrays)
            {
                length += array.Length;
            }
            T[] result = new T[length];
            length = first.Length;
            Array.Copy(first, 0, result, 0, first.Length);
            foreach (T[] array in arrays)
            {
                Array.Copy(array, 0, result, length, array.Length);
                length += array.Length;
            }
            return result;
        }

        public static T[] ConcatArraysLinq<T>(params T[][] arrays)
        {
            return (from array in arrays
                    from arr in array
                    select arr).ToArray();
        }

        public static T[] ConcatArraysLambda<T>(params T[][] arrays)
        {
            return arrays.SelectMany(array => array.Select(arr => arr)).ToArray();
        }
    }

}

The result was:

enter image description here

Roll your own wins.

3
  • In fairness to the methods that used methods, the Methods probably added roughly 10,000 ticks on my system.
    – amalgamate
    Nov 14, 2014 at 20:57
  • 2
    I ran your code in visual studio 2013 in release mode and found that, if the tested array is not so tiny as yours (like 1000 elements), CopyTo will be the fasest and ~3x faster than Roll your own.
    – Mr. Ree
    Jul 7, 2015 at 1:48
  • @Mr.Ree Yes, my array was truly tiny wasn't it. Thanks. Would be interested to see if Block copy does even better...
    – amalgamate
    Jul 7, 2015 at 15:13
11

More efficient (faster) to use Buffer.BlockCopy over Array.CopyTo,

int[] x = new int [] { 1, 2, 3};
int[] y = new int [] { 4, 5 };

int[] z = new int[x.Length + y.Length];
var byteIndex = x.Length * sizeof(int);
Buffer.BlockCopy(x, 0, z, 0, byteIndex);
Buffer.BlockCopy(y, 0, z, byteIndex, y.Length * sizeof(int));

I wrote a simple test program that "warms up the Jitter", compiled in release mode and ran it without a debugger attached, on my machine.

For 10,000,000 iterations of the example in the question

Concat took 3088ms

CopyTo took 1079ms

BlockCopy took 603ms

If I alter the test arrays to two sequences from 0 to 99 then I get results similar to this,

Concat took 45945ms

CopyTo took 2230ms

BlockCopy took 1689ms

From these results I can assert that the CopyTo and BlockCopy methods are significantly more efficient than Concat and furthermore, if performance is a goal, BlockCopy has value over CopyTo.

To caveat this answer, if performance doesn't matter, or there will be few iterations choose the method you find easiest. Buffer.BlockCopy does offer some utility for type conversion beyond the scope of this question.

2
  • I tried converting this to vb code but it didn't work. Apparently vb.net doesn't have the sizeOf function Jan 1 at 6:59
  • 1
    @TylerWayne that is true, sucks right. You could replace sizeOf(int) with the literal 4. Perhaps declaring a constant.
    – Jodrell
    Jan 6 at 15:30
10

Be careful with the Concat method. The post Array Concatenation in C# explains that:

var z = x.Concat(y).ToArray();

Will be inefficient for large arrays. That means the Concat method is only for meduim-sized arrays (up to 10000 elements).

1
  • 3
    What should be done with arrays containing more than 10,000 elements?
    – alex
    Jul 13, 2016 at 18:09
9

You can take the ToArray() call off the end. Is there a reason you need it to be an array after the call to Concat?

Calling Concat creates an iterator over both arrays. It does not create a new array so you have not used more memory for a new array. When you call ToArray you actually do create a new array and take up the memory for the new array.

So if you just need to easily iterate over both then just call Concat.

1
  • Although useful advice, this is not an answer. It should be a comment. May 6, 2021 at 0:12
8

Late Answer :-).

public static class ArrayExtention
    {

        public static T[] Concatenate<T>(this T[] array1, T[] array2)
        {
            T[] result = new T[array1.Length + array2.Length];
            array1.CopyTo(result, 0);
            array2.CopyTo(result, array1.Length);
            return result;
        }

    }
8

Here's my answer:

int[] z = new List<string>()
    .Concat(a)
    .Concat(b)
    .Concat(c)
    .ToArray();

This method can be used at initialization level, for example to define a static concatenation of static arrays:

public static int[] a = new int [] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
public static int[] b = new int [] { 6, 7, 8 };
public static int[] c = new int [] { 9, 10 };

public static int[] z = new List<string>()
    .Concat(a)
    .Concat(b)
    .Concat(c)
    .ToArray();

However, it comes with two caveats that you need to consider:

  • The Concat method creates an iterator over both arrays: it does not create a new array, thus being efficient in terms of memory used: however, the subsequent ToArray  will negate such advantage, since it will actually create a new array and take up the memory for the new array.
  • As @Jodrell said, Concat would be rather inefficient for large arrays: it should only be used for medium-sized arrays.

If aiming for performance is a must, the following method can be used instead:

/// <summary>
/// Concatenates two or more arrays into a single one.
/// </summary>
public static T[] Concat<T>(params T[][] arrays)
{
    // return (from array in arrays from arr in array select arr).ToArray();

    var result = new T[arrays.Sum(a => a.Length)];
    int offset = 0;
    for (int x = 0; x < arrays.Length; x++)
    {
        arrays[x].CopyTo(result, offset);
        offset += arrays[x].Length;
    }
    return result;
}

Or (for one-liners fans):

int[] z = (from arrays in new[] { a, b, c } from arr in arrays select arr).ToArray();

Although the latter method is much more elegant, the former one is definitely better for performance.

For additional info, please refer to this post on my blog.

0
6
public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] first, params T[][] arrays)
{
    int length = first.Length;
    foreach (T[] array in arrays)
    {
        length += array.Length;
    }
    T[] result = new T[length];
    length = first.Length;
    Array.Copy(first, 0, result, 0, first.Length);
    foreach (T[] array in arrays)
    {
        Array.Copy(array, 0, result, length, array.Length);
        length += array.Length;
    }
    return result;
}
3
  • 2
    At StackOverflow please don't just paste code, but also explain your approach. In this specific case you may also have to explain what your late answer adds to the answers already given (and accepted) Aug 6, 2012 at 21:53
  • 1
    Not sure what that "this" is doing before the first param, but for the rest, this is an excellent function. Generic, and with an infinite amount of parameters.
    – Nyerguds
    Sep 24, 2012 at 10:40
  • 2
    Hi Nyerguds. To answer your question, the "this" keyword is used to make the function an extension method. For more information on extension methods check out this MSDN article
    – JFish222
    Jan 31, 2013 at 2:29
3

The most efficient structure in terms of RAM (and CPU) to hold the combined array would be a special class that implements IEnumerable (or if you wish even derives from Array) and links internally to the original arrays to read the values. AFAIK Concat does just that.

In your sample code you could omit the .ToArray() though, which would make it more efficient.

3

Sorry to revive an old thread, but how about this:

static IEnumerable<T> Merge<T>(params T[][] arrays)
{
    var merged = arrays.SelectMany(arr => arr);

    foreach (var t in merged)
        yield return t;
}

Then in your code:

int[] x={1, 2, 3};
int[] y={4, 5, 6};

var z=Merge(x, y);  // 'z' is IEnumerable<T>

var za=z.ToArray(); // 'za' is int[]

Until you call .ToArray(), .ToList(), or .ToDictionary(...), the memory is not allocated, you are free to "build your query" and either call one of those three to execute it or simply go through them all by using foreach (var i in z){...} clause which returns an item at a time from the yield return t; above...

The above function can be made into an extension as follows:

static IEnumerable<T> Merge<T>(this T[] array1, T[] array2)
{
    var merged = array1.Concat(array2);

    foreach (var t in merged)
        yield return t;
}

So in the code, you can do something like:

int[] x1={1, 2, 3};
int[] x2={4, 5, 6};
int[] x3={7, 8};

var z=x1.Merge(x2).Merge(x3);   // 'z' is IEnumerable<T>

var za=z.ToArray(); // 'za' is int[]

The rest is the same as before.

One other improvement to this would be changing T[] into IEnumerable<T> (so the params T[][] would become params IEnumerable<T>[]) to make these functions accept more than just arrays.

Hope this helps.

4
  • Thre foreach / yield return is redundant. You could return directly the merged variable. So basicaly your merge is the same as Concat, isn't it? var z = x1.Concat(x2).Contact(x3); za=z.ToArray();
    – Liero
    Aug 30, 2021 at 7:51
  • @Liero, you're not wrong, but the foreach/yield return is required in this case (you probably know this, but the comment is for a future reader). When merging large sets of data, you don't always want the whole thing at once (i.e. the .ToArray() method, which could take a large amount of time). I have var za=x.ToArray() as an example, in general, the merged result (of type IEnumerable<T>) needs to be iterated in a loop to go through each result, one per iteration.
    – nurchi
    Sep 28, 2021 at 22:25
  • Sure, you don't need ToArray, but you can (should) still return the 'merged` variable in the first example, which is IEnumerable
    – Liero
    Sep 29, 2021 at 0:48
  • That is what yield return does (unless I misunderstood your comment).
    – nurchi
    Oct 13, 2021 at 15:56
2

I've found an elegant one line solution using LINQ or Lambda expression, both work the same (LINQ is converted to Lambda when program is compiled). The solution works for any array type and for any number of arrays.

Using LINQ:

public static T[] ConcatArraysLinq<T>(params T[][] arrays)
{
    return (from array in arrays
            from arr in array
            select arr).ToArray();
}

Using Lambda:

public static T[] ConcatArraysLambda<T>(params T[][] arrays)
{
    return arrays.SelectMany(array => array.Select(arr => arr)).ToArray();
}

I've provided both for one's preference. Performance wise @Sergey Shteyn's or @deepee1's solutions are a bit faster, Lambda expression being the slowest. Time taken is dependant on type(s) of array elements, but unless there are millions of calls, there is no significant difference between the methods.

2

You can do it the way you have referred to, or if you want to get really manual about it, you can roll your own loop:

string[] one = new string[] { "a", "b" };
string[] two = new string[] { "c", "d" };
string[] three;

three = new string[one.Length + two.Length];

int idx = 0;

for (int i = 0; i < one.Length; i++)
    three[idx++] = one[i];
for (int j = 0; j < two.Length; j++)
    three[idx++] = two[j];
0
1

What you need to remember is that when using LINQ you are utilizing delayed execution. The other methods described here all work perfectly, but they are executed immediately. Furthermore the Concat() function is probably optimized in ways you can't do yourself (calls to internal API's, OS calls etc.). Anyway, unless you really need to try and optimize, you're currently on your path to "the root of all evil" ;)

1

Try the following:

T[] r1 = new T[size1];
T[] r2 = new T[size2];

List<T> targetList = new List<T>(r1);
targetList.Concat(r2);
T[] targetArray = targetList.ToArray();
0

For int[] what you've done looks good to me. astander's answer would also work well for List<int>.

1
  • 2
    Concat would also work for List<int>. That's what is great about Concat, it works on any IEnumerable<>
    – Mike Two
    Oct 10, 2009 at 7:12
0

For smaller arrays <10000 elements:

using System.Linq;

int firstArray = {5,4,2};
int secondArray = {3,2,1};

int[] result = firstArray.ToList().Concat(secondArray.ToList()).toArray();
1
  • why use Linq when you don't have to?!
    – ina
    Jan 6, 2017 at 19:43
0
static class Extensions
{
    public static T[] Concat<T>(this T[] array1, params T[] array2) => ConcatArray(array1, array2);

    public static T[] ConcatArray<T>(params T[][] arrays)
    {
        int l, i;

        for (l = i = 0; i < arrays.Length; l += arrays[i].Length, i++);

        var a = new T[l];

        for (l = i = 0; i < arrays.Length; l += arrays[i].Length, i++)
            arrays[i].CopyTo(a, l);

        return a;
    }
}

I think the above solution is more general & lighter than the others I saw here. It is more general because it doesn't limit concatenation for only two arrays and is lighter because it doesn't use LINQ nor List.

Note the solution is concise and the added generality doesn't add significant runtime overhead.

2
  • I'd recommend trying to find newer questions or ones hat don't already have numerous answers - including one pretty much just like yours. May 10, 2014 at 1:19
  • I proposed this solution because I think it summarizes what is good from the other ones. It was crafted.
    – drowa
    May 10, 2014 at 5:50
-2

I think a list would be apt for this purpose.

You can create a list like this.

List<int> Items = new List<int>();  

Then you can pretty easily just use a for each loop to iterate over any number of arrays and add them to the list.

foreach (int i in nameOfArray)
{
    Items.Add(i); 
}

If you use a list it would remove the problem of an out of bounds exception. A list can be used for all the same functionality as an array. The only meaningful difference is the lack of a hard limit in the number of items.

-3
int[] scores = { 100, 90, 90, 80, 75, 60 };
int[] alice = { 50, 65, 77, 90, 102 };
int[] scoreBoard = new int[scores.Length + alice.Length];

int j = 0;
for (int i=0;i<(scores.Length+alice.Length);i++)  // to combine two arrays
{
    if(i<scores.Length)
    {
        scoreBoard[i] = scores[i];
    }
    else
    {
        scoreBoard[i] = alice[j];
        j = j + 1;

    }
}


for (int l = 0; l < (scores.Length + alice.Length); l++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(scoreBoard[l]);
}
-5

var z = x.Concat(y).ToArray();

1
  • 4
    Union is not a very good way to do this as it implicitly calls Distinct and removes any duplicates from the joined collection. Concat is much better, but it's already in the original question.
    – nurchi
    Jan 17, 2017 at 0:07

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