I want a regular expression that prevents symbols and only allows letters and numbers. This regex works great but it doesn't allow for spaces between words.

^[a-zA-Z0-9_]*$

For example, when using this regular expression "HelloWorld" is fine but "Hello World" does not match.

How can I tweak it to allow spaces?

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    @nhahtdh I made it clear I am a beginner with regular expression. If you are not helping, why bother writing replying at all! If I could have solved the problem myself I wouldn't be bothered asking a question here. Sometimes, if you are new to something, it's hard for you even some people may find it so easy! I believe "No Question is stupid if you are learning". – lawphotog Mar 18 '13 at 9:10
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    @nhahtdh Down voting a question because you believe the OP should have found the information elsewhere is against the principles of this community. This community will answer any question in its aim to become the main repository of all programming knowledge. This repository will include the answers to beginners questions as well as those by advanced users. When you look at the answers given it is evident that there are a number of ways to solve this problem. This is a useful question. – Aran Mulholland Jul 15 '13 at 6:38

14 Answers 14

up vote 247 down vote accepted

tl;dr

Just add a space in your character class.

^[a-zA-Z0-9_ ]*$

 


Now, if you want to be strict...

The above isn't exactly correct. Due to the fact that * means zero or more, it would match all of the following cases that one would not usually mean to match:

  • An empty string, "".
  • A string comprised entirely of spaces, "      ".
  • A string that leads and / or trails with spaces, "   Hello World  ".
  • A string that contains multiple spaces in between words, "Hello   World".

Originally I didn't think such details were worth going into, as OP was asking such a basic question that it seemed strictness wasn't a concern. Now that the question's gained some popularity however, I want to say...

...use @stema's answer.

Which, in my flavor (without using \w) translates to:

^[a-zA-Z0-9_]+( [a-zA-Z0-9_]+)*$

(Please upvote @stema regardless.)

Some things to note about this (and @stema's) answer:

  • If you want to allow multiple spaces between words (say, if you'd like to allow accidental double-spaces, or if you're working with copy-pasted text from a PDF), then add a + after the space:

    ^\w+( +\w+)*$
    
  • If you want to allow tabs and newlines (whitespace characters), then replace the space with a \s+:

    ^\w+(\s+\w+)*$
    

    Here I suggest the + by default because, for example, Windows linebreaks consist of two whitespace characters in sequence, \r\n, so you'll need the + to catch both.

Still not working?

Check what dialect of regular expressions you're using.* In languages like Java you'll have to escape your backslashes, i.e. \\w and \\s. In older or more basic languages and utilities, like sed, \w and \s aren't defined, so write them out with character classes, e.g. [a-zA-Z0-9_] and [\f\n\p\r\t], respectively.

 


* I know this question is tagged , but based on 25,000+ views, I'm guessing it's not only those folks who are coming across this question. Currently it's the first hit on google for the search phrase, regular expression space word.

  • it just does the job . thanks – lawphotog Mar 18 '13 at 13:50
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    it allows empty string – Neha Choudhary Sep 12 '13 at 14:23
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    Wow, so simple! thanks. Isnt there a site or something one can use to generate regex expressions, for noobs I mean... – Pierre Apr 28 '14 at 6:33
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    @Pierre - It's fairly difficult to take human instructions and convert them to explicit rules. (The human language is fluid and full of ambiguities, and our brains do most of the work required to resolve things and fill in the gaps. Computers don't have such a brain, and clever attempts to mimic one are not yet powerful enough.) There do exist tools like debuggex.com that represent your regex visually, but as appealing as it is it may not be very helpful for complete beginners. I recommend an interactive tutorial to get the basics down, however. – Andrew Cheong Apr 28 '14 at 9:55
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    @Pierre Three years later -- I came across this question today, saw your comment; I use regex hero (regexhero.net) for testing regular expressions. I think the online version only works in Internet Explorer with Silverlight but it's better than nothing. – Michael Armes Jul 26 '17 at 14:33

One possibility would be to just add the space into you character class, like acheong87 suggested, this depends on how strict you are on your pattern, because this would also allow a string starting with 5 spaces, or strings consisting only of spaces.

The other possibility is to define a pattern:

I will use \w this is in most regex flavours the same than [a-zA-Z0-9_] (in some it is Unicode based)

^\w+( \w+)*$

This will allow a series of at least one word and the words are divided by spaces.

^ Match the start of the string

\w+ Match a series of at least one word character

( \w+)* is a group that is repeated 0 or more times. In the group it expects a space followed by a series of at least one word character

$ matches the end of the string

  • 1
    Hm. Looking at this question a year later, this is a way better answer. – Andrew Cheong Apr 30 '14 at 23:28
  • This : regex101.com/#javascript also provides as good an explanation for the regex pattern you want to analyse. – Dark Star1 Sep 9 '14 at 11:35
  • Nice Regex, much simpler then a lot of [0-9a-z] etc – George Jul 6 '16 at 1:16

This one worked for me

([\w ]+)

Try with:

^(\w+ ?)*$

Explanation:

\w             - alias for [a-zA-Z_0-9]
"whitespace"?  - allow whitespace after word, set is as optional
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    This is so going to induce backtracking hell. – nhahtdh Mar 18 '13 at 8:58
  • What do you mean ? – hsz Mar 18 '13 at 8:58
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    For example, given a non-matching string ggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggg;, your regex is going to take very long time to reach the result due to excessive backtracking. – nhahtdh Mar 18 '13 at 8:59
  • Ok, so what do you suggest ? – hsz Mar 18 '13 at 9:01
  • Worked For Me!! Thanks! – Jimit Rupani Oct 27 '17 at 13:11

I assume you don't want leading/trailing space. This means you have to split the regex into "first character", "stuff in the middle" and "last character":

^([a-zA-Z0-9_][a-zA-Z0-9_ ]*[a-zA-Z0-9_]$

or if you use a perl-like syntax:

^\w[\w ]*\w$

Also: If you intentionally worded your regex that it also allows empty Strings, you have to make the entire thing optional:

^(\w[\w ]*\w)?$

If you want to only allow single space chars, it looks a bit different:

^((\w+ )*\w+)?$

This matches 0..n words followed by a single space, plus one word without space. And makes the entire thing optional to allow empty strings.

  • Space and \s are not equivalent. \s matches more than just space. – nhahtdh Mar 18 '13 at 9:31
  • @nhahtdh: Thanks for the comment. I'm too used to matching whitespace in general I guess.. Answer is fixed. – creinig Mar 18 '13 at 9:43

This does not allow space in the beginning. But allowes spaces in between words. Also allows for special characters between words. A good regex for FirstName and LastName fields.

\w+.*$

For alphabets only:

^([a-zA-Z])+(\s)+[a-zA-Z]+$

For alphanumeric value and _:

^(\w)+(\s)+\w+$
  • it is not good example, because (something)+ is not the same as (something+) . In first example, only single character will be captured as $1 . – Znik Nov 13 at 13:56

This regular expression

^\w+(\s\w+)*$

will only allow a single space between words and no leading or trailing spaces.

Below is the explanation of the regular expression:

  1. ^ Assert position at start of the string
  2. \w+ Match any word character [a-zA-Z0-9_]
    1. Quantifier: + Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed [greedy]
  3. 1st Capturing group (\s\w+)*
    1. Quantifier: * Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed [greedy]
    2. \s Match any white space character [\r\n\t\f ]
    3. \w+ Match any word character [a-zA-Z0-9_]
      1. Quantifier: + Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed [greedy]
  4. $ Assert position at end of the string

Had a good look at many of these supposed answers...

...and bupkis after scouring Stack Overflow as well as other sites for a regex that matches any string with no starting or trailing white-space and only a single space between strictly alpha character words.

^[a-zA-Z]+[(?<=\d\s]([a-zA-Z]+\s)*[a-zA-Z]+$

Thus easily modified to alphanumeric:

^[a-zA-Z0-9]+[(?<=\d\s]([a-zA-Z0-9]+\s)*[a-zA-Z0-9]+$

(This does not match single words but just use a switch/if-else with a simple ^[a-zA-Z0-9]+$ if you need to catch single words in addition.)

enjoy :D

  • 1
    [(?<=\d\s] matches one character: (, ?, <, =, a digit, or a whitespace character, and that can't be what you meant. If it was supposed to be a lookbehind, it should be (?<=\d\s), but it makes no sense there; the regex would never match. – Alan Moore May 24 '16 at 0:50

Try this: (Python version)

"(A-Za-z0-9 ){2, 25}"

change the upper limit based on your data set

I find this one works well for a "FullName":

([a-z',.-]+( [a-z',.-]+)*){1,70}/

All of above codes do not work when user include keyboard character. So here is the regx when the user is allowed to add any character or word but they can put spaces between words.Try this one.

 ^[^ ]+( [^ ]+)*$

Just add a space to end of your regex pattern as follows:

[a-zA-Z0-9_ ]
  • thanks, this has already mentioned. – lawphotog Sep 21 at 14:34

try .*? to allow white spaces it worked for me

  • That's because . matches everything. This is very likely not to be the solution here. – rubik Sep 12 '14 at 14:35
  • it matches zero or any characters, depended on what is before and after this sequence. this will match as few as possible. single dot represents any single character. – Znik Nov 13 at 13:57

protected by Pankaj Parkar Oct 6 '15 at 18:05

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