42

How is it possible that I can have instance variables in a module even though I cannot create an instance of the module? What would be the purpose of @stack in module Stacklike below?

module Stacklike
  def stack
    @stack ||= []
  end
end
1
  • 1
    If you want to use/initialize instance variables, consider inheritance instead of mixin. – Weihang Jian Jul 20 '16 at 13:49
47

Think of the instance variable as something which will exist in any class that includes your module, and things make a bit more sense:

module Stacklike
  def stack
    @stack ||= []
  end

  def add_to_stack(obj)
    stack.push(obj)
  end

  def take_from_stack
    stack.pop
  end
end

class ClownStack
  include Stacklike

  def size
    @stack.length
  end
end

cs = ClownStack.new
cs.add_to_stack(1)
puts cs.size

will output "1"

2
  • 11
    Is this really a good design? I mean, if you include a module without knowing what is in it you might get problems where variables are getting overridden and all kinds of issues arise. Specially in the case where the module needs some variable to store state in. Is there maybe a way of having state in a module without exposing it? – Automatico Dec 9 '13 at 1:14
  • 6
    No, it's not good design. But all bets are off anyway when it comes to modules and / or monkeypatching. After all, the behaviour of a ruby program can change ased on the order in which gems are required, let alone what the individual modules in a gem / application are doing. – mcfinnigan Dec 9 '13 at 8:12
14

See the below:

p RUBY_VERSION
module Stacklike
  def stack
    @stack ||= []
  end

  def add_to_stack(obj)
    stack.push(obj)
  end

  def take_from_stack
    stack.pop
  end
end

class A
include Stacklike
end

a = A.new
p a.instance_variables #<~~ E
p a.instance_variable_defined?(:@stack) #<~~ A
a.add_to_stack(10) #<~~ B
p a.instance_variable_defined?(:@stack) #<~~ C
p a.instance_variables #<~~ D

Output:

"1.9.3"
[]
false
true
[:@stack]

Explanation: Yes, Module instance variables are present in the class when you would include them inside the class. But you can see that p a.instance_variable_defined?(:@stack) is showing false as @stack is still not defined till A. At point B I defined the instance variable @stack. Thus statement in point C, outputs as true. Means module instance variables are not being created by the module itself,but that can be done by the class instances if the class included that module. Statement in E outputs [] as still that point the instance variable was not defined, but if you see the output for the line D, it is proved the @stack is inside the object a of class A.

Why such design?

This is the design or sometimes come from the requirements. Say you have been asked to write a stack operation code which will be used by two ticket booking companies,Say A and B. Now A are stack policy for their customers to serve but also they have any more formalities with that. B company also using stack policy with their own formalities which is different from A. Thus in case of designing Stack operation inside class A and class B, better idea to write it in a common place,as Both A and B have this functionality common within them. In future if another company C comes to you you can also use that module into their class, without rewriting the same functionality for each A,B and C. There can be more thoughts but hope this will help you to answer your self for your last part of the questions.

That's all about the concept. Hope it helps.

Cheers!!

1
  • Not entirely surprising. Try a = A.new; a.add_to_stack(1); a.instance_variables – Chowlett Mar 18 '13 at 14:23
5

When you include a module in a class, all of its instance methods are effectively "pasted in" to the host class. So if you have:

class Lifo
  include Stacklike
end

l = Lifo.new
l.add_to_stack(:widget)

Then l now has an instance variable @stack, brought in from Stacklike.

2
  • 1
    What about collisions then? If in Lifo I have a @stack variable, what takes preference? – Hommer Smith Mar 18 '13 at 14:18
  • 2
    They collide. @stack refers both to the one natively in Lifo and to the one from Stacklike. Pickaxe suggests not giving your mixin any state; instead, mandate that anything which includes it must provide a stack method. In many ways, a mixin with state isn't a mixin. It's a class. – Chowlett Mar 18 '13 at 14:22
4

When you include the module Stacklike in some other class that instance variable will be available as if it was defined in that class. That give you the option to set and handle instance variables of the base class from the module itself.

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