Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Does a map implementation exists where one can add alias(es) on existing keys

SuperMap map = .....;
map.put("key1" , object1);
map.addAlias("key1" , "aliaskey"); // <== create alias
Object o = map.get("aliaskey"); // equals object1

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
If the value refered to by key key1 were to later change, would you also want aliaskey to reflect the new value? – matts Mar 18 '13 at 21:08
    
Yes the value should have changed too. – taharqa Mar 18 '13 at 21:11
    
No :) Just 'cause i'm curious, what language supports this? – JHollanti Mar 18 '13 at 21:13
    
Hum, I meant "object1" is a reference to an object in memory. References can not be the same, right. But the referenced object can be the same. This is not working with primitives, String etc ^^ hope clearer ^^ – taharqa Mar 18 '13 at 21:25
    
In most of the examples here, aliaskey won't reflect the changed value -- see my answer below. Probably not the most elegant implementation, but it should work. – David Moles Mar 18 '13 at 21:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not sure what you want to use this for, or whether it's worth the trouble, but the implementations I've seen in this thread so far all have the problem that the alias becomes disconnected from the key it's aliasing. For instance, if you say:

SuperMap<String, String> sm = new SuperMap<String, String>();
sm.put("Elvis", "Presley");

sm.addAlias("Priscilla", "Elvis");
System.out.println(sm.get("Elvis"));
System.out.println(sm.get("Priscilla"));

sm.put("Elvis", "Costello");
System.out.println(sm.get("Elvis"));
System.out.println(sm.get("Priscilla"));

you're going to get:

Presley
Presley
Costello
Presley

(Note: that's with the original implementation of SuperMap, not the edited version.)

If you want a true alias -- if you want to get Presley, Presley, Costello, Costello -- you're going to need something a little more complicated.

The code below is untested (and the whole enterprise seems a little bit insane), but something like it should work:

public class AliasMap<K, V> extends AbstractMap<K, V>
{
    private final Map<K, V> backingMap;
    private final Map<K, K> aliasToRealKey;

    public AliasMap ()
    {
        this( new HashMap<K, V>() );
    }

    public AliasMap ( Map<K, V> backingMap )
    {
        this.backingMap = backingMap;
        aliasToRealKey = new HashMap<K, K>();
    }

    @Override
    public Set<Entry<K, V>> entrySet ()
    {
        return new AliasAwareEntrySet<K, V>( aliasToRealKey, backingMap );
    }

    @Override
    public V put ( K k, V v )
    {
        if ( aliasToRealKey.containsKey( k ) )
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException( "An alias '" + k + "' already exists in the map" );
        }
        return backingMap.put( k, v );
    }

    @Override
    public V get ( Object o )
    {
        V v = backingMap.get( o );
        if ( v == null )
        {
            K realKey = aliasToRealKey.get( o );
            if ( realKey == null )
            {
                return null;
            }
            return backingMap.get( realKey );
        }
        return v;
    }

    public void alias ( K realKey, K alias )
    {
        if ( backingMap.containsKey( alias ) )
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException( "The key '" + alias + "' already exists in the map" );
        }
        aliasToRealKey.put( alias, realKey );
    }

    private static class AliasAwareEntrySet<K, V> extends AbstractSet<Entry<K, V>>
    {
        private Map<K, K> aliasToRealKey;
        private Map<K, V> backingMap;

        public AliasAwareEntrySet ( Map<K, K> aliasToRealKey, final Map<K, V> backingMap )
        {
            this.aliasToRealKey = aliasToRealKey;
            this.backingMap = backingMap;
        }

        @Override
        public Iterator<Entry<K, V>> iterator ()
        {
            return new AliasAwareEntryIterator<K, V>( backingMap, aliasToRealKey );
        }

        @Override
        public int size ()
        {
            return backingMap.size() + aliasToRealKey.size();
        }

    }

    private static class AliasAwareEntryIterator<K, V> implements Iterator<Entry<K, V>>
    {
        Set<Entry<K, V>> realEntries;
        Set<K> aliasKeys;
        Iterator<Entry<K, V>> realIterator;
        Iterator<K> aliasIterator;

        boolean isRealEntry = true;
        private Map<K, V> backingMap;
        private Map<K, K> aliasToRealKey;

        public AliasAwareEntryIterator ( final Map<K, V> backingMap, Map<K, K> aliasToRealKey )
        {
            this.realEntries = backingMap.entrySet();
            this.aliasKeys = aliasToRealKey.keySet();

            realIterator = realEntries.iterator();
            aliasIterator = aliasKeys.iterator();
            this.backingMap = backingMap;
            this.aliasToRealKey = aliasToRealKey;
        }

        public boolean hasNext ()
        {
            return realIterator.hasNext() || aliasIterator.hasNext();
        }

        public Entry<K, V> next ()
        {
            if ( realIterator.hasNext() )
            {
                return realIterator.next();
            }
            isRealEntry = false;

            final K alias = aliasIterator.next();
            final K realKey = aliasToRealKey.get( alias );
            return new AliasAwareEntry( alias, realKey );
        }

        public void remove ()
        {
            if ( isRealEntry )
            {
                realIterator.remove();
            }
            else
            {
                aliasIterator.remove();
            }
        }

        private class AliasAwareEntry implements Entry<K, V>
        {

            private final K alias;
            private final K realKey;

            public AliasAwareEntry ( K alias, K realKey )
            {
                this.alias = alias;
                this.realKey = realKey;
            }

            public K getKey ()
            {
                return alias;
            }

            public V getValue ()
            {
                return backingMap.get( realKey );
            }

            public V setValue ( V v )
            {
                return backingMap.put( realKey, v );
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main ( String[] args )
    {
        AliasMap<String, String> sm = new AliasMap<String, String>();
        sm.put( "Elvis", "Presley" );

        sm.alias( "Elvis", "Priscilla" );
        System.out.println( sm.get( "Elvis" ) );
        System.out.println( sm.get( "Priscilla" ) );

        sm.put( "Elvis", "Costello" );
        System.out.println( sm.get( "Elvis" ) );
        System.out.println( sm.get( "Priscilla" ) );

        for ( String s : sm.keySet() )
        {
            System.out.println(s);
        }

        for ( Iterator<Entry<String, String>> iterator = sm.entrySet().iterator(); iterator.hasNext(); )
        {
            Entry<String, String> entry = iterator.next();
            System.out.println( entry.getKey() + " : " + entry.getValue() );
            if ( "Priscilla".equals( entry.getKey() ) )
            {
                iterator.remove();
            }
        }

        for ( String s : sm.keySet() )
        {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can make the alias just another key entry that points to the same value.

map.put("key1", object1);
map.put("aliaskey", map.get("key1")); // <== create alias

Object o = map.get("aliaskey"); // equals object1
share|improve this answer
    
You are right, this works. – taharqa Mar 18 '13 at 21:13

@DavidMoles is the only one who's given you an answer that does true aliasing so far. All of the others just make copies, meaning if you update an entry with an "alias" key the "original" key is not updated.

However, this all seems like a bad design to me. Having multiple keys in your map point to the same key is not the expected semantics of a map. Instead, I'd recommend you do the alias mapping outside of your map, and create a new type to enforce that you always properly unalias before doing a lookup:

// AliasTest.java

import java.util.*;

public class AliasTest {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<Aliaser<String>.Key, Integer> map = new HashMap<Aliaser<String>.Key, Integer>();
    Aliaser<String> aliaser = new Aliaser<String>();
    map.put(aliaser.addKey("A"), 1);
    map.put(aliaser.addKey("B"), 2);
    map.put(aliaser.addKey("C"), 3);
    aliaser.addAlias("A", "X");
    map.put(aliaser.lookup("X"), 5);
    System.out.println(map.get(aliaser.lookup("A")));
  }

}

// Aliaser.java

import java.util.*;

public class Aliaser<T> {

  public class Key { }

  private Map<T, Key> aliases = new HashMap<T, Key>();

  public Key addKey(T alias) {
    Key key = new Key();
    aliases.put(alias, key);
    return key;
  }

  public void addAlias(T orig, T alias) {
    aliases.put(alias, aliases.get(orig));
  }

  public Key lookup(T alias) {
    return aliases.get(alias);
  }

}

Note how the map has type Map<Aliaser<String>.Key, Integer> instead of Map<String, Integer>. This helps us by making the Java compiler assert (through type checks) that we always properly unalias all of our String keys before doing a map lookup.

If you were using Scala you could do all of the String->Aliaser<String>.Key conversions automatically with implicit conversions, but in Java you're stuck doing the conversions manually. You could always declare some local methods to make it less verbose though—or just use shorter variable/method names than the ones I used in my example.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "bad design". :) – David Moles Mar 18 '13 at 21:46

I'm not sure such an implementation already exists, but feel free to develop your own:

public class SuperMap<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {

    private final HashMap<K, K> aliases = new HashMap<K, K>();

    public void addAlias(final K alias, final K key) {
        aliases.put(alias, key);
    }

    @Override
    public V get(final Object key) {
        if (keySet().contains(key)) {
            return super.get(key);
        } else if (aliases.keySet().contains(key)) {
            return super.get(aliases.get(key));
        }
        return null;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
this works as well and is closer to the question. – taharqa Mar 18 '13 at 21:13
    
but ... don't you think the right implementation need to be lazy ? I mean we store aliases, we do not put value, but we actually "return" the value only when asked. For this we would override the get method. Will update my question. I think this is the right way. – taharqa Mar 18 '13 at 21:22
    
@taharqa Here you are ;) – sp00m Mar 18 '13 at 21:44

Simply put the value into the map with different keys:

Map<String, Integer> map = new HashMap<>();
Integer value = 42;
map.put("firstKey", value);
map.put("secondKey", value);
System.out.println(map.get("firstKey") == map.get("secondKey"));

> true
share|improve this answer
    
This works because you used a primitive type. When using any other object, don't forget to add the same instance of the object by using map.put("secondKey", map.get("firstKey")). – sp00m Mar 18 '13 at 21:15
    
Technically it isn't a primitive type, but a primitive wrapper (Integer). But yes, the values for the two keys need to be either the same or equal. I'll update the answer. – Natix Mar 18 '13 at 21:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.