10

I'm trying to code in the simplest way a program to count word occurrences in file in Scala Language. So far I have these piece of code:

import scala.io.Codec.string2codec
import scala.io.Source
import scala.reflect.io.File

object WordCounter {
    val SrcDestination: String = ".." + File.separator + "file.txt"
    val Word = "\\b([A-Za-z\\-])+\\b".r

    def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {

        val counter = Source.fromFile(SrcDestination)("UTF-8")
                .getLines
                .map(l => Word.findAllIn(l.toLowerCase()).toSeq)
                .toStream
                .groupBy(identity)
                .mapValues(_.length)

        println(counter)
    }
}

Don't bother of regexp expression. I would like to know how to extract single words from sequence retrieved in this line:

map(l => Word.findAllIn(l.toLowerCase()).toSeq)

in order to get each word occurency counted. Currently I'm getting map with counted words sequences.

32

You can turn the file lines into words by splitting them with the regex "\\W+" (flatmap is lazy so it doesn't need to load the entire file into memory). To count occurrences you can fold over a Map[String, Int] updating it with each word (much more memory and time efficient than using groupBy)

scala.io.Source.fromFile("file.txt")
  .getLines
  .flatMap(_.split("\\W+"))
  .foldLeft(Map.empty[String, Int]){
     (count, word) => count + (word -> (count.getOrElse(word, 0) + 1))
  }
  • 2
    I'm really new to scala, so I have a bit of trouble understanding the anonymous function you pass to foldLeft. How does it know to reverse the order of the tuple you pass in to (count, word)? – Allen Wang Nov 2 '15 at 15:07
  • 3
    The count is actually a Map[String, Int] and the word is a String. – Garrett Hall Nov 5 '15 at 17:01
  • 3
    Yes I understand now, the first element of the tuple is the accumulator, and the second element is the element foldLeft is iterating over. – Allen Wang Nov 5 '15 at 21:45
  • 1
    It took me a long time to understand this. I used the understanding to answer another question on SO and explained what is happening in more detail.. Perhaps it will help someone. stackoverflow.com/questions/41006847/… – Nick Brady Dec 7 '16 at 17:17
  • The foldLeft function, has an empty Map[String, Int], as I understand for every new word it finds, it creates a new map(since it is immutable!), does it have performance issues ? – jdk2588 Jun 14 '17 at 16:42
14

I think the following is slightly easier to understand:

Source.fromFile("file.txt").
  getLines().
  flatMap(_.split("\\W+")).
  toList.
  groupBy((word: String) => word).
  mapValues(_.length)
  • 5
    FWIW, I think you could replace (word: String) => word with identity. – metasim Feb 9 '14 at 15:46
  • 5
    This would hold the whole file content in memory, while the accepted answers would not. – benroth May 5 '14 at 17:41
1

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking, but I think I see the problem. Try using flatMap instead of map:

flatMap(l => Word.findAllIn(l.toLowerCase()).toSeq)

This will concatenate all of your sequences together so that groupBy is done on individual words instead of at the line level.


A note about your Regex

I know you said not to worry about your Regex, but here are a couple changes you can make to make it a little more readable. Here's what you have right now:

val Word = "\\b([A-Za-z\\-])+\\b".r

First, you can use Scala's triple-quoted strings so you don't have to escape your backslashes:

val Word = """\b([A-Za-z\-])+\b""".r

Second, if you put the - at the beginning of your character class then you don't need to escape it:

val Word = """\b([-A-Za-z])+\b""".r
1

Here is what I did. This will chop a file. Hashmap is a good bet for high performance and will outperform any sort of sort. There is a more terse sort and slice function in there too you can look at.

import java.io.FileNotFoundException

/**.
 * Cohesive static method object for file handling.
 */
object WordCountFileHandler {

  val FILE_FORMAT = "utf-8"

  /**
   * Take input from file. Split on spaces.
   * @param fileLocationAndName string location of file
   * @return option of string iterator
   */
  def apply (fileLocationAndName: String) : Option[Iterator[String]] = {
    apply (fileLocationAndName, " ")
  }

  /**
   * Split on separator parameter.
   * Speculative generality :P
   * @param fileLocationAndName string location of file
   * @param wordSeperator split on this string
   * @return
   */
  def apply (fileLocationAndName: String, wordSeperator: String): Option[Iterator[String]] = {
    try{
      val words = scala.io.Source.fromFile(fileLocationAndName).getLines() //scala io.Source is a bit hackey. No need to close file.

      //Get rid of anything funky... need the double space removal for files like the README.md...
      val wordList = words.reduceLeft(_ + wordSeperator + _).replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z\\s]", "").replaceAll("  ", "").split(wordSeperator)
      //wordList.foreach(println(_))
      wordList.length match {
        case 0 => return None
        case _ => return Some(wordList.toIterator)
      }
    } catch {
      case _:FileNotFoundException => println("file not found: " + fileLocationAndName); return None
      case e:Exception => println("Unknown exception occurred during file handling: \n\n" + e.getStackTrace); return None
    }
  }
}

import collection.mutable

/**
 * Static method object.
 * Takes a processed map and spits out the needed info
 * While a small performance hit is made in not doing this during the word list analysis,
 * this does demonstrate cohesion and open/closed much better.
 * author: jason goodwin
 */
object WordMapAnalyzer {

  /**
   * get input size
   * @param input
   * @return
   */
  def getNumberOfWords(input: mutable.Map[String, Int]): Int = {
    input.size
  }

  /**
   * Should be fairly logarithmic given merge sort performance is generally about O(6nlog2n + 6n).
   * See below for more performant method.
   * @param input
   * @return
   */

  def getTopCWordsDeclarative(input: mutable.HashMap[String, Int], c: Int): Map[String, Int] = {
    val sortedInput = input.toList.sortWith(_._2 > _._2)
    sortedInput.take(c).toMap
  }

  /**
   * Imperative style is used here for much better performance relative to the above.
   * Growth can be reasoned at linear growth on random input.
   * Probably upper bounded around O(3n + nc) in worst case (ie a sorted input from small to high).
   * @param input
   * @param c
   * @return
   */
  def getTopCWordsImperative(input: mutable.Map[String, Int], c: Int): mutable.Map[String, Int] = {
    var bottomElement: (String, Int) = ("", 0)
    val topList = mutable.HashMap[String, Int]()

    for (x <- input) {
      if (x._2 >= bottomElement._2 && topList.size == c ){
        topList -= (bottomElement._1)
        topList +=((x._1, x._2))
        bottomElement = topList.toList.minBy(_._2)
      } else if (topList.size < c ){
        topList +=((x._1, x._2))
        bottomElement = topList.toList.minBy(_._2)
      }
    }
    //println("Size: " + topList.size)

    topList.asInstanceOf[mutable.Map[String, Int]]
  }
}

object WordMapCountCalculator {

  /**
   * Take a list and return a map keyed by words with a count as the value.
   * @param wordList List[String] to be analysed
   * @return HashMap[String, Int] with word as key and count as pair.
   * */

   def apply (wordList: Iterator[String]): mutable.Map[String, Int] = {
    wordList.foldLeft(new mutable.HashMap[String, Int])((word, count) => {
      word get(count) match{
        case Some(x) => word += (count -> (x+1))   //if in map already, increment count
        case None => word += (count -> 1)          //otherwise, set to 1
      }
    }).asInstanceOf[mutable.Map[String, Int]] 
}
0

Starting Scala 2.13, in addition to retrieving words with Source, we can use the groupMapReduce method which is (as its name suggests) an equivalent of a groupBy followed by mapValues and a reduce step:

import scala.io.Source

Source.fromFile("file.txt")
  .getLines.to(LazyList)
  .flatMap(_.split("\\W+"))
  .groupMapReduce(identity)(_ => 1)(_ + _)

The groupMapReduce stage, similarly to Hadoop's map/reduce logic,

  • groups words by themselves (identity) (group part of groupMapReduce)

  • maps each grouped word occurrence to 1 (map part of groupMapReduce)

  • reduces values within a group of words (_ + _) by summing them (reduce part of groupMapReduce).

This is a one-pass version of what can be translated by:

seq.groupBy(identity).mapValues(_.map(_ => 1).reduce(_ + _))

Also note the cast from Iterator to LazyList in order to use a collection which provides groupMapReduce (we don't use a Stream, since starting Scala 2.13, LazyList is the recommended replacement of Streams).


On the same principle, one could also use a for-comprehension version:

(for {
  line <- Source.fromFile("file.txt").getLines.to(LazyList)
  word <- line.split("\\W+")
} yield word)
.groupMapReduce(identity)(_ => 1)(_ + _)

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