295
votes

After reading Hidden Features of C# I wondered, What are some of the hidden features of Java?

2
  • 17
    Note that it's not always a great idea to use these hidden features; often times they are surprising and confusing to others reading your code. Nov 5 '09 at 18:10
  • 1
    You (/someone) should probabbly sum up the answers neatly in the question body like the C# question.
    – ripper234
    Dec 10 '09 at 19:34

100 Answers 100

10
votes

"const" is a keyword, but you can't use it.

int const = 1;   // "not a statement"
const int i = 1; // "illegal start of expression"

I guess the compiler writers thought it might be used in the future and they'd better keep it reserved.

5
  • 1
    Not exactly a "feature", but definitely "hidden".
    – Michael Myers
    Oct 17 '08 at 20:13
  • Not just a non-feature, an anti-feature! (I also didn't mention that goto is the same--reserved but unimplemented).
    – Michael Myers
    Jul 21 '09 at 14:22
  • It is reserved for the compiler to create better error messages. Mar 14 '11 at 22:19
  • goto is also a keyword, you cannot use. ;) May 6 '11 at 7:24
  • 1
    @Peter Lawrey: I know, but it had already been posted.
    – Michael Myers
    May 6 '11 at 13:07
10
votes

An optimization trick that makes your code easier to maintain and less susceptible to a concurrency bug.

public class Slow {
  /** Loop counter; initialized to 0. */
  private long i;

  public static void main( String args[] ) {
    Slow slow = new Slow();

    slow.run();
  }

  private void run() {
    while( i++ < 10000000000L )
      ;
  }
}

$ time java Slow
real 0m15.397s
$ time java Slow
real 0m20.012s
$ time java Slow
real 0m18.645s

Average: 18.018s

public class Fast {
  /** Loop counter; initialized to 0. */
  private long i;

  public static void main( String args[] ) {
    Fast fast = new Fast();

    fast.run();
  }

  private void run() {
    long i = getI();

    while( i++ < 10000000000L )
      ;

    setI( i );
  }

  private long setI( long i ) {
    this.i = i;
  }

  private long getI() {
    return this.i;
  }
}

$ time java Fast
real 0m12.003s
$ time java Fast
real 0m9.840s
$ time java Fast
real 0m9.686s

Average: 10.509s

It requires more bytecodes to reference a class-scope variable than a method-scope variable. The addition of a method call prior to the critical loop adds little overhead (and the call might be inlined by the compiler anyway).

Another advantage to this technique (always using accessors) is that it eliminates a potential bug in the Slow class. If a second thread were to continually reset the value of i to 0 (by calling slow.setI( 0 ), for example), the Slow class could never end its loop. Calling the accessor and using a local variable eliminates that possibility.

Tested using J2SE 1.6.0_13 on Linux 2.6.27-14.

6
  • 1
    but Fast is not the same as Slow: the value of member "Fast.i" is NOT changed by/after the loop. If you call the run() method a second time, Slow will be much faster (increments "i" only once) and Fast will be as slows before since "Fast.i" is still zero.
    – user85421
    Jun 22 '09 at 17:19
  • You are correct, Carlos. To make Fast and Slow have the same behaviour (in a single-threaded environment), the instance variable "i" would have to be updated at the end of the "run" method, which would not significantly impact performance. Jun 22 '09 at 20:56
  • also got a "strange" result using System.currentTimeMillis() around the call to calculate the runtime: slow is faster than fast (slow=40.6s, fast=42.9s) for 1.6.0_13-b03 on WindowsXP
    – user85421
    Jun 22 '09 at 23:22
  • Carlos: Try four runs for both classes without any potentially CPU-intensive programs running (e.g., virus checker, system update, browser). Also, throw out the first run in both test volleys. That Fast is slower than Slow by ~2 seconds leads me to believe something interfered with the runs. (That is, it should not take 2 seconds to get and set a variable via its accessor.) Jun 22 '09 at 23:50
  • 2
    "Premature optimization" is a phrase used to describe a situation where a programmer lets performance considerations affect the design of a piece of code. This can result in a design that is not as clean as it could have been or code that is incorrect, because the code is complicated by the optimization and the programmer is distracted by optimizing. [ref: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optimization_%28computer_science%29]
    – jdigital
    Aug 13 '09 at 0:26
10
votes

Use StringBuilder instead of StringBuffer when you don't need synchronized management included in StringBuilder. It will increase the performance of your application.

Improvements for Java 7 would be even better than any hidden Java features:

  • Diamond syntax: Link

Don't use those infinite <> syntax at instanciation:

Map<String, List<String>> anagrams = new HashMap<String, List<String>>();

// Can now be replaced with this:

Map<String, List<String>> anagrams = new HashMap<>();
  • Strings in switch: Link

Use String in switch, instead of old-C int:

String s = "something";
switch(s) {
 case "quux":
    processQuux(s);
    // fall-through

  case "foo":
  case "bar":
    processFooOrBar(s);
    break;

  case "baz":
     processBaz(s);
    // fall-through

  default:
    processDefault(s);
    break;
}
  • Automatic Resource Management Link

This old code:

static void copy(String src, String dest) throws IOException {
    InputStream in = new FileInputStream(src);
    try {
        OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(dest);
        try {
            byte[] buf = new byte[8 * 1024];
            int n;
            while ((n = in.read(buf)) >= 0)
                out.write(buf, 0, n);
        } finally {
            out.close();
        }
    } finally {
        in.close();
    }
}

can now be replaced by this much simpler code:

static void copy(String src, String dest) throws IOException {
    try (InputStream in = new FileInputStream(src);
            OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(dest)) {
        byte[] buf = new byte[8192];
        int n;
        while ((n = in.read(buf)) >= 0)
            out.write(buf, 0, n);
    }
}
2
  • 4
    Do you mean StringBuilder instead of StringWriter? The APIs for StringBuffer and StringBuilder are the same however using StringWriter would require some code changes.
    – pjp
    Dec 7 '09 at 12:15
  • 2
    He actually meant StringBuilder which is not thread-safe but faster. StringBuffer is thread safe, but slower. Should be used only if you need thread safety while building your string buffer.
    – Archer
    Jul 11 '11 at 6:51
9
votes

How about Properties files in your choice of encodings? Used to be, when you loaded your Properties, you provided an InputStream and the load() method decoded it as ISO-8859-1. You could actually store the file in some other encoding, but you had to use a disgusting hack like this after loading to properly decode the data:

String realProp = new String(prop.getBytes("ISO-8859-1"), "UTF-8");

But, as of JDK 1.6, there's a load() method that takes a Reader instead of an InputStream, which means you can use the correct encoding from the beginning (there's also a store() method that takes a Writer). This seems like a pretty big deal to me, but it appears to have been snuck into the JDK with no fanfare at all. I only stumbled upon it a few weeks ago, and a quick Google search turned up just one passing mention of it.

1
  • Don't do your hack, please - it messes up all \uXXXX escape sequences. Better use native2ascii to convert the file after editing and before deploying, or use the reader variant of the load() method. Mar 14 '11 at 22:21
9
votes

Something that really surprised me was the custom serialization mechanism.

While these methods are private!!, they are "mysteriously" called by the JVM during object serialization.

private void writeObject(ObjectOutputStream out) throws IOException;
private void readObject(ObjectInputStream in) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException;

This way you can create your own custom serialization to make it more "whatever" (safe, fast, rare, easy etc. )

This is something that really should be considering if a lot of information has to be passed through nodes. The serialization mechanism may be changed to send the half of data. There are many times when the bottlenecks are not in the platform, but in the amount of that sent trough the wire, may save you thousands of dlls in hardware.

Here is an article. http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Programming/serialization/

1
  • This is also useful for custom serialization for objects with non-Serializable members.
    – Jorn
    Nov 2 '08 at 21:36
9
votes

Identifiers can contain foreign language chars like umlauts:

instead of writing:

String title="";

someone could write:

String Überschrift="";
4
  • 1
    and you can access it like \u00dcberschrift = "OK";
    – user85421
    Jan 9 '10 at 23:11
  • 8
    Not good style in my opinion. You know what I mean if you ever had to work with some code with comments and identifiers in a language you do not understand. Code should not be localized. Mar 25 '10 at 0:35
  • The problem is not so much that in any real-size project there will be developers speaking different languages... The problem is that in any real size project there shall be a mix of Windows and Unx (including OS X) machines and a mix of different IDEs using different setups. Combine that with the fact that *.java text files have no metadata describing their file encodings nor good specs (the specs allow any character encoding) and you've got your recipe for disasters. Java programmers using non-ASCII chars inside String of in identifiers deserve to be shot to death. Dec 20 '10 at 23:30
  • 1
    non-ASCII Strings should be externalized and build scripts and/or pre-commit verifiers should be configured to fail immediately upon detecting such clueless non-sense. Our Ant build scripts here will fail and put any developer trying to do that on the wall of shame. Dec 20 '10 at 23:32
9
votes

I can add Scanner object. It is the best for parsing.

String input = "1 fish 2 fish red fish blue fish";
Scanner s = new Scanner(input).useDelimiter("\\s*fish\\s*");
System.out.println(s.nextInt());
System.out.println(s.nextInt());
System.out.println(s.next());
System.out.println(s.next());
s.close();
1
  • 4
    In my opinion, this is not a hidden feature. The Scanner is a library. Jun 9 '10 at 9:17
8
votes

Annotation Processing API from Java 6 looks very perspective for code generation and static code verification.

8
votes

People are sometimes a bit surprised when they realize that it's possible to call private methods and access/change private fields using reflection...

Consider the following class:

public class Foo {
    private int bar;

    public Foo() {
        setBar(17);
    }

    private void setBar(int bar) {
        this.bar=bar;
    }

    public int getBar() {
        return bar;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return "Foo[bar="+bar+"]";
    }
}

Executing this program...

import java.lang.reflect.*;

public class AccessibleExample {
    public static void main(String[] args)
        throws NoSuchMethodException,IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException, NoSuchFieldException {
        Foo foo=new Foo();
        System.out.println(foo);

        Method method=Foo.class.getDeclaredMethod("setBar", int.class);
        method.setAccessible(true);
        method.invoke(foo, 42);

        System.out.println(foo);
        Field field=Foo.class.getDeclaredField("bar");
        field.setAccessible(true);
        field.set(foo, 23);
        System.out.println(foo);
    }
}

...will yield the following output:

Foo[bar=17]
Foo[bar=42]
Foo[bar=23]
1
  • The setAccessible call can be forbidden by the Security manager, though. Mar 14 '11 at 22:29
8
votes

Most people does not know they can clone an array.

int[] arr = {1, 2, 3};
int[] arr2 = arr.clone();
3
  • You can call clone on any Object. You just need to be careful that the Object implements a deep clone.
    – Finbarr
    May 13 '10 at 11:12
  • 8
    @Finbarr: Quite the reverse. It does a shallow clone; the inner objects just get another reference to them. The “simplest” way to deep clone is to serialize and deserialize, or to actually understand what you're making a copy of. Jun 11 '10 at 8:56
  • @Finbar: one can't call clone on any Object, only on objects from classes which made this method public, or are from the current class. Mar 14 '11 at 22:27
7
votes

JVisualVM from the bin directory in the JDK distribution. Monitoring and even profiling any java application, even one you didn't launch with any special parameters. Only in recent versions of the Java 6SE JDK.

1
  • If you're using Spring to tool up your annotated JMX beans to work with jconsole and jvisualvm, you need to manually start the management interface rather than relying on the default VM-created one. If you don't, you'll run into problems with the presence of multiple clashing “singletons” and your JMX beans will neatly end up in the wrong one… Jun 11 '10 at 8:49
7
votes

The power you can have over the garbage collector and how it manages object collection is very powerful, especially for long-running and time-sensitive applications. It starts with weak, soft, and phantom references in the java.lang.ref package. Take a look at those, especially for building caches (there is a java.util.WeakHashMap already). Now dig a little deeper into the ReferenceQueue and you'll start having even more control. Finally grab the docs on the garbage collector itself and you'll be able to control how often it runs, sizes of different collection areas, and the types of algorithms used (for Java 5 see http://java.sun.com/docs/hotspot/gc5.0/gc_tuning_5.html).

1
  • WeakHashMap is not suitable for building caches.
    – Bombe
    Nov 27 '09 at 14:54
7
votes

You can access final local variables and parameters in initialization blocks and methods of local classes. Consider this:

    final String foo = "42";
    new Thread() {
        public void run() {
             dowhatever(foo);
        }
    }.start();

A bit like a closure, isn't it?

1
  • I knew that you can't acces non-finals, but I was surprised that you can access finals. Dec 17 '08 at 17:47
7
votes

You can build a string sprintf-style using String.format().

String w = "world";
String s = String.format("Hello %s %d", w, 3);

You can of course also use special specifiers to modify the output.

More here: http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/Formatter.html#syntax

0
7
votes

Actually, what I love about Java is how few hidden tricks there are. It's a very obvious language. So much so that after 15 years, almost every one I can think of is already listed on these few pages.

Perhaps most people know that Collections.synchronizedList() adds synchronization to a list. What you can't know unless you read the documentation is that you can safely iterate on the elements of that list by synchronizing on the list object itself.

CopyOnWriteArrayList might be unknown to some, and Future represents an interesting way to abstract multithreaded result access.

You can attach to VMs (local or remote), get information on GC activity, memory use, file descriptors and even object sizes through the various management, agent and attach APIs.

Although TimeUnit is perhaps better than long, I prefer Wicket's Duration class.

6
votes

Joshua Bloch's new Effective Java is a good resource.

1
  • Great book, but it doesn't really deal so much with hidden features. Oct 16 '08 at 12:35
6
votes

Some control-flow tricks, finally around a return statement:

int getCount() { 
  try { return 1; }
  finally { System.out.println("Bye!"); }
}

The rules for definite assignment will check that a final variable is always assigned through a simple control-flow analysis:

final int foo;
if(...)
  foo = 1;
else
  throw new Exception();
foo+1;
6
votes

Instances of the same class can access private members of other instances:

class Thing {
  private int x;

  public int addThings(Thing t2) {
    return this.x + t2.x;  // Can access t2's private value!
  }
}
5
  • It was only until very recently that I learned this, and someone had to point it out to me in a comment left on my blog.
    – moffdub
    Jan 8 '09 at 0:29
  • 1
    It's surprising if you have exposure to an OO language other than C++. Feb 4 '09 at 16:12
  • 3
    It's awful. Don't do it. It's not because I'm human that another human has the right to look into my bowels ;-)
    – cadrian
    Jun 30 '09 at 13:33
  • 6
    But how would you do a proper hash/equals implementation if you cant access its innards?
    – Chii
    Jul 21 '09 at 12:41
  • 1
    it is exactly the same logic that allows a method to access a private instance variable... private classes are part of the implementation, thus there should be no restrictions on the access between inner classes and the parent, the parent and inner classes, and inner classes to other inner classes.
    – TofuBeer
    Jul 5 '10 at 18:38
6
votes

Source code URLs. E.g. here is some legal java source code:

http://google.com

(Yes, it was in Java Puzzlers. I laughed...)

0
6
votes

Didn't read about this

Integer a = 1;
Integer b = 1;
Integer c = new Integer(1);
Integer d = new Integer(1);

Integer e = 128;
Integer f = 128;

assertTrue (a == b);   // again: this is true!
assertFalse(e == f); // again: this is false!
assertFalse(c == d);   // again: this is false!

read more about this by searching java's pool of integer (internal 'cache' from -128 to 127 for autoboxing) or look into Integer.valueOf

5
  • 3
    The exact limit is implementation dependent (has only some minimum size), so in some VMs the second test could be true, too. Mar 14 '11 at 22:51
  • Is it true to say that the third test will be false regardless of the VM ?
    – Pacerier
    Dec 7 '11 at 12:45
  • @Pacerier to be honest. not sure. but it worked at the time I was posting this ... just do not depend on the == operator ...
    – Karussell
    Dec 7 '11 at 21:40
  • So, they use the pointer to store small integer values, is that it?
    – Hejazzman
    Jan 8 '12 at 14:18
  • This is specified by the Java Language Specification for the range [-127,127]. As for the other integers, I'm not sure Jan 9 '12 at 14:45
5
votes

String Parameterised Class Factory.

Class.forName( className ).newInstance();

Load a resource (property file, xml, xslt, image etc) from deployment jar file.

this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream( ... ) ;
5
votes

The next-generation Java plugin found in Java 1.6 Update 10 and later has some very neat features:

  • Pass java_arguments parameter to pass arguments to the JVM that is created. This allows you to control the amount of memory given to the applet.
  • Create separate class loaders or even separate JVM's for each applet.
  • Specify the JVM version to use.
  • Install partial Java kernels in cases where you only need a subset of the full Java libraries' functionality.
  • Better Vista support.
  • Support (experimental) to drag an applet out of the browser and have it keep running when you navigate away.

Many other things that are documented here: http://jdk6.dev.java.net/plugin2/

More from this release here: http://jdk6.dev.java.net/6u10ea.html

5
votes

Intersection types allow you to (kinda sorta) do enums that have an inheritance hierarchy. You can't inherit implementation, but you can delegate it to a helper class.

enum Foo1 implements Bar {}
enum Foo2 implements Bar {}

class HelperClass {
   static <T extends Enum<T> & Bar> void fooBar(T the enum) {}
}

This is useful when you have a number of different enums that implement some sort of pattern. For instance, a number of pairs of enums that have a parent-child relationship.

enum PrimaryColor {Red, Green, Blue;}
enum PastelColor {Pink, HotPink, Rockmelon, SkyBlue, BabyBlue;}

enum TransportMedium {Land, Sea, Air;}
enum Vehicle {Car, Truck, BigBoat, LittleBoat, JetFighter, HotAirBaloon;}

You can write generic methods that say "Ok, given an enum value thats a parent of some other enum values, what percentage of all the possible child enums of the child type have this particular parent value as their parent?", and have it all typesafe and done without casting. (eg: that "Sea" is 33% of all possible vehicles, and "Green" 20% of all possible Pastels).

The code look like this. It's pretty nasty, but there are ways to make it better. Note in particuar that the "leaf" classes themselves are quite neat - the generic classes have declarations that are horribly ugly, but you only write them onece. Once the generic classes are there, then using them is easy.

import java.util.EnumSet;

import javax.swing.JComponent;

public class zz extends JComponent {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(PrimaryColor.Green + " " + ParentUtil.pctOf(PrimaryColor.Green) + "%");
        System.out.println(TransportMedium.Air + " " + ParentUtil.pctOf(TransportMedium.Air) + "%");
    }


}

class ParentUtil {
    private ParentUtil(){}
    static <P extends Enum<P> & Parent<P, C>, C extends Enum<C> & Child<P, C>> //
    float pctOf(P parent) {
        return (float) parent.getChildren().size() / //
                (float) EnumSet.allOf(parent.getChildClass()).size() //
                * 100f;
    }
    public static <P extends Enum<P> & Parent<P, C>, C extends Enum<C> & Child<P, C>> //
    EnumSet<C> loadChildrenOf(P p) {
        EnumSet<C> cc = EnumSet.noneOf(p.getChildClass());
        for(C c: EnumSet.allOf(p.getChildClass())) {
            if(c.getParent() == p) {
                cc.add(c);
            }
        }
        return cc;
    }
}

interface Parent<P extends Enum<P> & Parent<P, C>, C extends Enum<C> & Child<P, C>> {
    Class<C> getChildClass();

    EnumSet<C> getChildren();
}

interface Child<P extends Enum<P> & Parent<P, C>, C extends Enum<C> & Child<P, C>> {
    Class<P> getParentClass();

    P getParent();
}

enum PrimaryColor implements Parent<PrimaryColor, PastelColor> {
    Red, Green, Blue;

    private EnumSet<PastelColor>    children;

    public Class<PastelColor> getChildClass() {
        return PastelColor.class;
    }

    public EnumSet<PastelColor> getChildren() {
        if(children == null) children=ParentUtil.loadChildrenOf(this);
        return children;
    }
}

enum PastelColor implements Child<PrimaryColor, PastelColor> {
    Pink(PrimaryColor.Red), HotPink(PrimaryColor.Red), //
    Rockmelon(PrimaryColor.Green), //
    SkyBlue(PrimaryColor.Blue), BabyBlue(PrimaryColor.Blue);

    final PrimaryColor  parent;

    private PastelColor(PrimaryColor parent) {
        this.parent = parent;
    }

    public Class<PrimaryColor> getParentClass() {
        return PrimaryColor.class;
    }

    public PrimaryColor getParent() {
        return parent;
    }
}

enum TransportMedium implements Parent<TransportMedium, Vehicle> {
    Land, Sea, Air;

    private EnumSet<Vehicle>    children;

    public Class<Vehicle> getChildClass() {
        return Vehicle.class;
    }

    public EnumSet<Vehicle> getChildren() {
        if(children == null) children=ParentUtil.loadChildrenOf(this);
        return children;
    }
}

enum Vehicle implements Child<TransportMedium, Vehicle> {
    Car(TransportMedium.Land), Truck(TransportMedium.Land), //
    BigBoat(TransportMedium.Sea), LittleBoat(TransportMedium.Sea), //
    JetFighter(TransportMedium.Air), HotAirBaloon(TransportMedium.Air);

    private final TransportMedium   parent;

    private Vehicle(TransportMedium parent) {
        this.parent = parent;
    }

    public Class<TransportMedium> getParentClass() {
        return TransportMedium.class;
    }

    public TransportMedium getParent() {
        return parent;
    }
}
5
votes

Read "Java Puzzlers" by Joshua Bloch and you will be both enlightened and horrified.

5
votes

Comma & array. It is legal syntax: String s[] = {
"123" ,
"234" ,
};

1
  • I had the trailing comma break on a certain version of javac, 1.6.0_13 or 17 I think
    – gtrak
    Jan 13 '12 at 19:17
5
votes

Java 6 (from Sun) comes with an embedded JavaScrip interpreter.

http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/scripting/programmer_guide/index.html#jsengine

1
5
votes

It has already been mentioned that a final array can be used to pass a variable out of the anonymous inner classes.

Another, arguably better and less ugly approach though is to use AtomicReference (or AtomicBoolean/AtomicInteger/…) class from java.util.concurrent.atomic package.

One of the benefits in doing so is that these classes also provide such methods as compareAndSet, which may be useful if you're creating several threads which can modify the same variable.


Another useful related pattern:

final AtomicBoolean dataMsgReceived = new AtomicBoolean(false);
final AtomicReference<Message> message = new AtomicReference<Message>();
withMessageHandler(new MessageHandler() {
    public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
         if (msg.isData()) {
             synchronized (dataMsgReceived) {
                 message.set(msg);
                 dataMsgReceived.set(true);
                 dataMsgReceived.notifyAll();
             }
         }
    }
}, new Interruptible() {
    public void run() throws InterruptedException {
        synchronized (dataMsgReceived) {
            while (!dataMsgReceived.get()) {
                dataMsgReceived.wait();
            }
        }
    }
});

In this particular example we could have simply waited on message for it to become non-null, however null may often be a valid value and then you need to use a separate flag to finish the wait.

waitMessageHandler(…) above is yet another useful pattern: it sets up a handler somewhere, then starts executing the Interruptible which may throw an exception, and then removes the handler in the finally block, like so:

private final AtomicReference<MessageHandler> messageHandler = new AtomicReference<MessageHandler>();
public void withMessageHandler(MessageHandler handler, Interruptible logic) throws InterruptedException {
    synchronized (messageHandler) {
        try {
            messageHandler.set(handler);
            logic.run();
        } finally {
            messageHandler.set(null);
        }
    }
}

Here I assume that the messageHandler's (if it's not null) handleMessage(…) method is called by another thread when a message is received. messageHandler must not be simply of MessageHandler type: that way you will synchronize on a changing variable, which is clearly a bug.

Of course, it doesn't need to be InterruptedException, it could be something like IOException, or whatever makes sense in a particular piece of code.

4
votes

Functors are pretty cool. They are pretty close to a function pointer, which everyone is usually quick to say is impossible in Java.

Functors in Java

2
  • 7
    Not impossible, merely impossibly verbose. Feb 4 '09 at 16:11
  • Isnt this a feature of opps than java specific??
    – Ravisha
    Aug 24 '10 at 7:08
4
votes

SwingWorker for easily managing user interface callbacks from background threads.

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