295
votes

After reading Hidden Features of C# I wondered, What are some of the hidden features of Java?

locked by Bill the Lizard Jun 5 '12 at 18:13

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. See the help center for guidance on writing a good question.

Read more about locked posts here.

  • 17
    Note that it's not always a great idea to use these hidden features; often times they are surprising and confusing to others reading your code. – Kevin Bourrillion Nov 5 '09 at 18:10
  • 1
    You (/someone) should probabbly sum up the answers neatly in the question body like the C# question. – ripper234 Dec 10 '09 at 19:34

100 Answers 100

4
votes

Apparently with some debug builds there is an option which dumps the native (JIT) assembly code from HotSpot: http://weblogs.java.net/blog/kohsuke/archive/2008/03/deep_dive_into.html

Unfortunately I wasn't able to find the build via the link in that post, if anyone can find a more precise URL, I'd love to play with it.

4
votes

You can switch(this) inside method definitions of enum classes. Made me shout "whut!" loudly when I discovered that this actually works.

  • 6
    Wow, switch works with enum’s… big surprise. – Bombe Nov 30 '09 at 9:21
  • Yes, switch works with enum expressions generally, not only inside of enum classes. – Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 14 '11 at 22:49
4
votes

You can add runtime checks of generic types using a Class<T> object, this comes in handy when a class is being created in a configuration file somewhere and there is no way to add a compile time check for the generic type of the class. You dont want the class to blow up at runtime if the app happens to be configured wrong and you dont want all you classes riddled with instance of checks.

public interface SomeInterface {
  void doSomething(Object o);
}
public abstract class RuntimeCheckingTemplate<T> {
  private Class<T> clazz;
  protected RuntimeChecking(Class<T> clazz) {
    this.clazz = clazz;
  }

  public void doSomething(Object o) {
    if (clazz.isInstance(o)) {
      doSomethingWithGeneric(clazz.cast(o));
    } else {
      // log it, do something by default, throw an exception, etc.
    }
  }

  protected abstract void doSomethingWithGeneric(T t);
}

public class ClassThatWorksWithStrings extends RuntimeCheckingTemplate<String> {
  public ClassThatWorksWithStrings() {
     super(String.class);
  }

  protected abstract void doSomethingWithGeneric(T t) {
    // Do something with the generic and know that a runtime exception won't occur 
    // because of a wrong type
  }
}
3
votes

Since no one else has said it yet (I Think) my favorite feature is Auto boxing!

public class Example
{
    public static void main(String[] Args)
    {
         int a = 5;
         Integer b = a; // Box!
         System.out.println("A : " + a);
         System.out.println("B : " + b);
    }
}
  • 5
    I think the question is about hidden features, not favourite features. I'm guessing autoboxing is pretty well known to anyone who uses 1.5 or later. – Andrew Swan Sep 24 '08 at 23:08
  • 2
    Yes, but because of performance it's better to use valueOf. – Trick Nov 30 '09 at 13:08
  • @Trick Using valueOf explicitly makes no difference as autoboxing compiles to an invocation of valueOf. This is memory-efficient compared to invoking the Integer or Long constructor for small values, because valueOf uses a cache of small values. – Christian Semrau Dec 3 '10 at 23:25
  • 1
    autoboxing is one of the most abused features. Not that it is a major issue, in fact, you'll never notice it, but you will find thousands of cases like boolean b = Boolean.valueOf(someString) in all projects imaginable. – MeBigFatGuy Apr 2 '11 at 16:40
3
votes

Some years ago when I had to do Java (1.4.x) I wanted an eval() method and Suns javac is (was?) written in Java so it was just to link tools.jar and use that with some glue-code around it.

2
votes

You can override a method and have the superclass constructor call it (this may come as a surprise to C++ programmers.)

Example

  • 2
    This can lead to a lot of problems. Consider this: class B extends class A and overrides method doSomething(), which is called by A's constructor. Now constructors are called in base -> derived order, but A's constructor calls B's doSomething(). Is B initialized? – ivant Nov 15 '11 at 8:23
1
vote

I enjoyed

  1. javadoc's taglet and doclet that enable us to customize javadoc output.
  2. JDK tools: jstat, jstack etc.
0
votes

Java Bean property accessor methods do not have to start with "get" and "set".

Even Josh Bloch gets this wrong in Effective Java.

  • 6
    Well, of course they don't it's more of a code convention. Many frameworks/apis rely on reflection to access your properties, so not using get(is)/set is just asking for troubles. – serg Jul 12 '09 at 23:06
  • 5
    That's proving my point. The use of get/set prefixes is taken from the Java Beans API and is just the default naming convention, not mandatory. But authors of poorly designed frameworks/APIs seem not to know this. They hard-code a naming convention that classes must use to work with their framework (and then have the cheek to say that their framework supports POJOs; mandating a naming convention, by definition, makes their framework not support POJOs). – Nat Aug 13 '09 at 13:14
-3
votes

I was surprised when I first noticed the Ternary-Operator which equals a simple if-then-else statement:

minVal = (a < b) ? a : b;
  • 13
    IMHO it's neither hidden nor suprising, most languages i know have it (C, C++, C#, PHP, Perl, Javascript, ...) – Morfildur Apr 9 '10 at 12:18
  • I know that by now, but a few weeks ago I did not think of such an operator. It is probably because I am not too expierienced, but my mind was somewhat blown :D – user312723 Apr 9 '10 at 12:36
  • 1
    I agree with @dbermerlin. This is NOT a hidden feature. It very common. – Shervin Asgari Apr 10 '10 at 16:24
-8
votes

Surprises me that an interface can extend multiple interfaces but class can extend only one class.

  • 1
    Not really. There's never any issues as to "which superclass implementation should be called", since there are no implementations. – WhyNotHugo Jan 3 '10 at 2:56
  • How you would extend 2 classes that has same named method? What method will be included into final implementation? – Archer Jul 11 '11 at 7:06
  • @archer multiple inheritance is actually possible. In that case you point out, we can simply reject it or employ one of the name conflict resolution techniques. – Pacerier Dec 7 '11 at 12:53

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.