2

I want to decrease my code execution time. Looking at some testing results, I found out that GetHashCode() took 21,62% of my execution time.

I also got a warning:

Warning 1 DA0010: .*.GetHashCode() = 7,63; GetHashCode functions should be cheap and not allocate any memory. Reduce complexity of hash code function if possible.

Code Snippets:

My GetHashCode() in Field Class:

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int hash = 7;
        hash = (hash * 13) + this.Coordinate.GetHashCode();
        return hash;
    }

My GetHashCode() in Coordinate Class:

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int hash = 17;

        hash = (hash * 23) + this.Row.GetHashCode();
        hash = (hash * 23) + this.Column.GetHashCode();

        return hash;
    }

Edit: Row and Column are just byte variables. I just call their property which returns a byte in the get accessor

My GetHashCode() in Sudoku Class:

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        int hash = 7;

        hash = (hash * 5) + this.Grid.GetHashCode();

        return hash;
    }

Edit: Grid is just a multidimensional array of type: Field[,], I just call it's Property here which returns a Field[,] grid through it's get accessor.

Questions: How can I greatly decrease the complexity of my GetHashCode() and increase it's performance? Why is the performance of GetHashCode() method so low?

  • 2
    What do the GetHashCode methods look like in Row and Column? – siride Mar 19 '13 at 13:31
  • Show the GetHashCode for Row and Column. – Mohammad Dehghan Mar 19 '13 at 13:35
  • 1
    and the GetHashCode of the Grid class? – Jehof Mar 19 '13 at 13:35
  • 1
    Why are using using custom hashcodes here? I suspect they are not really needed on such a high level as the Sudoko or Grid classes. – leppie Mar 19 '13 at 13:40
  • Did your application actually computed something significant, except for hashcodes when you profiled it? What was the absoulte execution time of GetHashCode, in seconds? And execution count is also intresting to look at. – alex Mar 19 '13 at 13:42
2

I suspect you'll find that GetHashCode isn't your problem. If you're spending > 20% of your time in GetHashCode, you must be doing a whole lot of dictionary lookups. Or you're using the hash code for something you probably shouldn't be using it for.

GetHashCode might be the manifestation of the performance problem, but it's almost certainly not the cause.

  • Yes, I do a lot of dictionary lookups. Shouldn't I override GetHashCode in this case? – dylanmensaert Mar 19 '13 at 13:45
  • Oh, yes, you need to override GetHashCode if you're using those objects as dictionary keys. What I suspect, though, is that your higher level algorithm is inefficient, resulting in too many dictionary lookups. I can't say for sure, of course, not having seen your code, but that's been my experience in the past. I've never found GetHashCode to be a performance bottleneck. – Jim Mischel Mar 19 '13 at 13:52
  • Thank you, I will look into my algorithm and try to find a way to decrease the number of lookups. – dylanmensaert Mar 19 '13 at 13:54
  • 1
    It's also possible that you shouldn't be using a higher level object like this as a key; perhaps there is a simpler object representative of it that can be used as the key. – Servy Mar 19 '13 at 14:11
2

Your calculation is just adding a conts to your hashcode. Only the combination of your hashcodes needs to have a better hashcode then just adding the two values:

//Field 
public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return this.Coordinate.GetHashCode();
}

//Coordinate 
public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return  this.Column.GetHashCode() * 17 + this.Row.GetHashCode();
}    

//Sudoku, I doubt if this is ever called...
public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return this.Grid.GetHashCode();
}

For performance it realy depends on how often you call GetHashCode (if you do any calculation). Or if you store them in some kind of dictionay, the problem can be multiple values with the same hash, which will decrese your access time to the objects in the dictionary/hashtable. So your hashfunction has to be a good distrubution for the set you are storing.

  • +1 for actually noting easy optimizations to the OP's code. – Adrian Mar 19 '13 at 13:49
1

If your classes don't have too many mutators, you can cache the hash code and just return the cached value from GetHashCode(). (Even if you have a lot of mutators you can do this, but it is likely to be much less effective if objects are frequently mutated.)

You should lazily evaluate it. You will need to know when it is dirty and needs to be recalculated. You can do this easily by adding a bool isHashCodeDirty field, which is initialised to true when the class is constructed and also by every mutator method.

Then in your implementation of GetHashCode() if isHashCodeDirty is true, set it to false and recalculate and return the hash code. If it's false, just return the cached value.

You have to be careful with multithreading here, of course. I think that adding a lock to GetHashCode() would impact performance quite a lot though!

The ideal of course is to have immutable classes; then you just calculate the hash code once in the constructor and it'll never change thereafter.

  • A hash code can never be dirty (they should stay the same over the objects lifespan), you will get problems when you have objects in hashtables when the hashcode changes. – Peter Mar 19 '13 at 14:04
  • @peer Well, it needs to be constant over the entire time it's a key of the Dictionary, not the entire lifetime of the object (although they will often by the same, or close to it). It's still unlikely that the hash code should be mutated once it's computed the first time. Be very sure you know what's happening if that's the case. – Servy Mar 19 '13 at 14:13
  • @peer: Yes well, that's why I said the ideal is to have immutable classes! And a mutating hash code is a red flag! – Matthew Watson Mar 19 '13 at 14:15
0

Looks like the problem is not in integer addition, but in accessing properties like this.Coordinate, this.Grid, e.t.c.

Take a look at their get accessors, they may be doing some extra work.

  • The get accessory is really simple. Just returning the private datamember every time. – dylanmensaert Mar 19 '13 at 13:34

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