4

When I implement a class in C++/CLI DLL:

public ref class DummyClass
{
protected:
    !DummyClass() 
    {
        // some dummy code:
        std::cout << "hello" << std::endl;
    }
}

and when I load that DLL to C# project and use the class just by repeatedly creating an object:

static void Main()
{
    while (true)
    {
        var obj = new DummyClass();
    }
}

then, while running the program, memory is slowly digested to OutOfMemoryException.

It seems, that this memory leak (or bad work of garbage collection) happens everytime I implement finalizer in C++/CLI.

Why happens this memory leak? How could I avoid it and be still able to use finalizer for some other (more complicated) use?


UPDATE: The cause surely is not in writing to Console / stdout or other non-standard code in finalizer, the following class has the same memory leaking behaviour:

public ref class DummyClass
{
private:
    double * ptr;
public:
    DummyClass()
    {
         ptr = new double[5];
    }
protected:
    !DummyClass() 
    {
         delete [] ptr;
    }
}
  • 3
    Writing to the Console/stdout will cause it. See xacc.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/gc-suppressfinalize for my observations and some comments. The general rule in .NET classes, do not do anything in the finalizer (except for implementing IDisposable correctly). – leppie Mar 20 '13 at 11:10
  • I updated the question, so you can see, that even when you do what you should do in the finalizer (e.g. deleting unmanaged resources), you still get the same memory leaking results. – frakon Mar 20 '13 at 11:49
  • Not sure about that, but I think I recall C++/CLI has both a finalizer and a destructor (indeed so ~DummyClass for destructor). Try that instead. – leppie Mar 20 '13 at 12:06
  • Here is relevant question: stackoverflow.com/questions/15339608/… – leppie Mar 20 '13 at 12:06
  • Some more info from MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177197(v=vs.100).aspx (All too confusing for me ;p) – leppie Mar 20 '13 at 12:08
3

When you allocate faster than you can garbage collect you will run into OOM. If you do heavy allocations the CLR will insert a Sleep(xx) to throttle allocation but this is not enough in your extreme case.

When you implement a finalizer your object is added to the finalization queue and when it was finalized it is removed from the queue. This does impose additional overhead and you will make your object life longer than necessary. Even if your object could be freed during a cheap Gen 0 GC it is still referenced by the finalization queue. When a full GC is happening the CLR does trigger the finalizaion thread to start cleaning up. This does not help since you do allocate faster than you can finalize (writing to stdout is very slow) and your finalization queue will become bigger and bigger leading to slower and slower finalization times.

I have not measured it but I think even an empty finalizer will cause this issue since the increased object lifetime and two finalization queue handling (finalizer queue and f-reachable queue) do impose enough overhead to make finalization slower than allocation.

You need to remember that finalization is an inherent asynchronous operation with no execution guarantees at a specific point of time. The CLR will never wait to clean all pending finalizers before allowing additional allocations. If you allocate on 10 threads there will still be one finalizer thread cleaning up after you. If you want to rely on deterministic finalization you will need to wait by calling GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() but this will bring your performance to a grinding halt.

Your OOM is therefore expected.

  • THANK YOU! When I inserted Thread.Sleep(1000); after each 1000000th DummyObject creation (so GC has its time), memory stopped leaking! – frakon Mar 20 '13 at 12:27
  • Suggested GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() once per Xth iteration solves the problem too. Thanks. – frakon Mar 20 '13 at 12:42
  • It is not the GC taking its time it is the exeuction time of the finalizer thread that is the limiting you. If you can make the finalizer run faster you do need less frequently to stop. – Alois Kraus Mar 20 '13 at 13:33
  • FYI: when GC tries to collect an object with finalizer, it not only puts it into finalization queue, but also that object gets promoted to a generation+1 - because its 'ghost' survived a sweep. I've read about that no longer than year ago in some article at either the MSDN or RedGate's white papers. Sorry, but I don't have a link right now:/ – quetzalcoatl Mar 28 '13 at 0:12
0

You should use the AddMemoryPressure function, otherwise the garbage collector underestimates the need for cleaning up these objects in a timely manner.

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