41

I need a HashSet that preserves insertion ordering, are there any implementations of this in the framework?

  • 2
    I imagine you mean like Java's LinkedHashSet – thejoshwolfe Dec 10 '11 at 18:31
  • 3
    yeah the simplest thing to do is to wrap a linked list and hashset together ... its what I ended up doing in the past. useful for an LRU implementation – Sam Saffron Dec 11 '11 at 2:10
  • 1
    By definition of Set should not preserve any order. – Damian Leszczyński - Vash Jul 25 '13 at 10:50
  • 1
    @vash In lieu of that remark, the question should then really be "I need a data structure that preserved insertion order and that has access characteristics of a hashset, ie. O(1) etc." – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Jul 25 '13 at 15:05
25

Standard .NET HashSet do not preserve the insertion order. For simple tests the insertion order may be preserved due to an accident, but it's not guaranteed and would not always work that way. To prove that it is enough to do some removals in between.

See this question for more information on that: Does HashSet preserve insertion order?

I have briefly implemented a HashSet which guarantees insertion order. It uses the Dictionary to look up items and the LinkedList to preserve order. All three insertion, removal and lookup work still in O(1).

public class OrderedSet<T> : ICollection<T>
{
    private readonly IDictionary<T, LinkedListNode<T>> m_Dictionary;
    private readonly LinkedList<T> m_LinkedList;

    public OrderedSet()
        : this(EqualityComparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    public OrderedSet(IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        m_Dictionary = new Dictionary<T, LinkedListNode<T>>(comparer);
        m_LinkedList = new LinkedList<T>();
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return m_Dictionary.Count; }
    }

    public virtual bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return m_Dictionary.IsReadOnly; }
    }

    void ICollection<T>.Add(T item)
    {
        Add(item);
    }

    public bool Add(T item)
    {
        if (m_Dictionary.ContainsKey(item)) return false;
        LinkedListNode<T> node = m_LinkedList.AddLast(item);
        m_Dictionary.Add(item, node);
        return true;
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        m_LinkedList.Clear();
        m_Dictionary.Clear();
    }

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        LinkedListNode<T> node;
        bool found = m_Dictionary.TryGetValue(item, out node);
        if (!found) return false;
        m_Dictionary.Remove(item);
        m_LinkedList.Remove(node);
        return true;
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return m_LinkedList.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        return m_Dictionary.ContainsKey(item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        m_LinkedList.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }
}
  • 3
    You should really provide an overload taking an IEqualityComparer<T> to pass to the same overload of IDictionary<T>. Out of the box, your example check equality through object references (for classes, at least) and offers no options to change that behaviour. I understand however that this is a simple example. – Simon Belanger Jul 25 '13 at 16:57
  • 1
    @SimonBelanger Agree. I have just posted a version which implements all variants of common constructors and methods here: gmamaladze.wordpress.com/2013/07/25/… – George Mamaladze Jul 25 '13 at 22:29
18

You can get this functionality easily using KeyedCollection<TKey,TItem> specifying the same type argument for TKey and TItem:

public class OrderedHashSet<T> : KeyedCollection<T, T>
{
    protected override T GetKeyForItem(T item)
    {
        return item;
    }
}
  • 3
    When you call Remove will it call Remove(T) or Remove(TKey)? The first is O(n) and the second is O(1). – Scott Chamberlain Feb 26 '14 at 22:11
  • 2
    It calls Remove(TKey) because it is the one on the most derived class. However, calling Remove() when the collection is cast as a Collection<T> or ICollection<T> will call the Remove(T) overload. – kcnygaard Feb 26 '14 at 22:53
  • 4
    Another clarification: Both Remove(T) and Remove(TKey) are O(n) because KeyedCollection<T, T> uses a list to store the items. – kcnygaard Feb 27 '14 at 14:51
  • 3
    Note that unlike a regular System.Collections.Generic.HashSet<T>, this will throw a System.ArgumentException on duplicate key instead of returning false. – MrLore Oct 5 '15 at 14:29
  • 1
    @kcnygaard - why do you believe that KeyedCollection maintains insertion ordering? Internally it is simply a Dictionary, which is known to not maintain order under all conditions. – ToolmakerSteve Nov 20 '18 at 21:34
5

If you need constant complexity of Add, Remove, Contains and order preservation, then there's no such collection in .NET Framework 4.5.

If you're okay with 3rd party code, take a look at my repository (permissive MIT license): https://github.com/OndrejPetrzilka/Rock.Collections

There's OrderedHashSet<T> collection:

  • based on classic HashSet<T> source code (from .NET Core)
  • preserves order of insertions and allows manual reordering
  • features reversed enumeration
  • has same operation complexities as HashSet<T>
  • Add and Remove operations are 20% slower compared to HashSet<T>
  • consumes 8 more bytes of memory per item

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