11

Is there a way to turn a Seq[Future[X]] into an Enumerator[X] ? The use case is that I want to get resources by crawling the web. This is going to return a Sequence of Futures, and I'd like to return an Enumerator that will push the futures in the order in which they are first finished on to the Iteratee.

It looks like Victor Klang's Future select gist could be used to do this - though it looks pretty inefficient.

Note: The Iteratees and Enumerator's in question are those given by the play framework version 2.x, ie with the following imports: import play.api.libs.iteratee._

0
3

Using Victor Klang's select method:

  /**
   * "Select" off the first future to be satisfied.  Return this as a
   * result, with the remainder of the Futures as a sequence.
   *
   * @param fs a scala.collection.Seq
   */
  def select[A](fs: Seq[Future[A]])(implicit ec: ExecutionContext): 
      Future[(Try[A], Seq[Future[A]])] = {
    @scala.annotation.tailrec
    def stripe(p: Promise[(Try[A], Seq[Future[A]])],
               heads: Seq[Future[A]],
               elem: Future[A],
               tail: Seq[Future[A]]): Future[(Try[A], Seq[Future[A]])] = {
      elem onComplete { res => if (!p.isCompleted) p.trySuccess((res, heads ++ tail)) }
      if (tail.isEmpty) p.future
      else stripe(p, heads :+ elem, tail.head, tail.tail)
    }
    if (fs.isEmpty) Future.failed(new IllegalArgumentException("empty future list!"))
    else stripe(Promise(), fs.genericBuilder[Future[A]].result, fs.head, fs.tail)
   }
}

I can then get what I need with

    Enumerator.unfoldM(initialSeqOfFutureAs){ seqOfFutureAs =>
        if (seqOfFutureAs.isEmpty) {
          Future(None)
        } else {
          FutureUtil.select(seqOfFutureAs).map {
            case (t, seqFuture) => t.toOption.map {
              a => (seqFuture, a)
            }
          }
        }
    }

1
  • I am a bit concerned that using Victor Klang's select implementation is not efficient enough. In this algorithm we need to traverse the whole sequence, which requires each Future to be registered with a new Promise on each pass. It should be possible to create an algorithm where one only needs to do this once... Perhaps it is just a matter of subclassing Enumerator, and registering each future in the sequence with the enumerator. Mar 22 '13 at 8:53
2

A better, shorter and I think more efficient answer is:

   def toEnumerator(seqFutureX: Seq[Future[X]]) = new Enumerator[X] { 
      def apply[A](i: Iteratee[X, A]): Future[Iteratee[X, A]] = {
        Future.sequence(seqFutureX).flatMap { seqX: Seq[X] => 
            seqX.foldLeft(Future.successful(i)) {
              case (i, x) => i.flatMap(_.feed(Input.El(x)))
            }
        }
      }
    }

2
  • 2
    Careful, Future.sequence returns a Failed Future if any of the seqFutureX futures fail. Mar 30 '13 at 16:13
  • and this solutions awaits all futures be completed before feeding Iteratee, while another one from @bblfish put it as early as possible (without preserved order!).
    – viktortnk
    May 15 '14 at 15:50
1

I do realise that the question is a bit old already, but based on Santhosh's answer and the built-in Enumterator.enumerate() implementation I came up with the following:

def enumerateM[E](traversable: TraversableOnce[Future[E]])(implicit ec: ExecutionContext): Enumerator[E] = {
  val it = traversable.toIterator
  Enumerator.generateM {
    if (it.hasNext) {
      val next: Future[E] = it.next()
      next map {
        e => Some(e)
      }
    } else {
      Future.successful[Option[E]] {
        None
      }
    }
  }
}

Note that unlike the first Viktor-select-based-solution this one preserves the order, but you can still start off all computations asynchronously before. So, for example, you can do the following:

// For lack of a better name
def mapEachM[E, NE](eventuallyList: Future[List[E]])(f: E => Future[NE])(implicit ec: ExecutionContext): Enumerator[NE] =
  Enumerator.flatten(
    eventuallyList map { list =>
      enumerateM(list map f)
    }
  )

This latter method was in fact what I was looking for when I stumbled on this thread. Hope it helps someone! :)

0

You could construct one using the Java Executor Completeion Service (JavaDoc). The idea is to use create a sequence of new futures, each using ExecutorCompletionService.take() to wait for the next result. Each future will start, when the previous future has its result.

But please b e aware, that this might be not that efficient, because a lot of synchronisation is happening behind the scenes. It might be more efficient, to use some parallel map reduce for calculation (e.g. using Scala's ParSeq) and let the Enumerator wait for the complete result.

1
  • "each future will start when the previous future has a result": that seems like it is blocking. In the code provided in my answer above all futures in the seqOfFuturesA is executed in parallel. Mar 21 '13 at 14:00
0

WARNING: Not compiled before answering

What about something like this:

def toEnumerator(seqFutureX: Seq[Future[X]]) = new Enumerator[X] { 
  def apply[A](i: Iteratee[X, A]): Future[Iteratee[X, A]] = 
    Future.fold(seqFutureX)(i){ case (i, x) => i.flatMap(_.feed(Input.El(x)))) }
}
3
  • The signature of fold is def fold[T, R](futures: scala.TraversableOnce[Future[T]])(zero: R)(foldFun: (R, T) => R)(implicit executor: ExecutionContext): Future[R] but your code has the signature fold[T, R](futures: Seq[Future[T]])(zero: Iteratee[T,R])(foldFun: (R, T) => Future[R])(implicit executor: ExecutionContext): Future[R] there is problem with foldfun, because i.flatMap(_.feed(Input.El(x)) returns a Future[R] not an R Mar 29 '13 at 17:57
  • but i is of type "Iteratee[X, A]", and flatMap should return a "Iteratee[X, A]", no? (given that feed returns Iteratee[X, A]) Mar 29 '13 at 18:32
  • Play's Iteratee[E,A] defines flatMap as: def flatMap[B](f: A => Iteratee[E, B]): Iteratee[E, B] so that your case should really be written as case (i,x) => i.flatMap(a=> ...). And then a is no longer an Iteratee, and so it does not have a feed method. If on the other hand one then tries to do case (i,x) => i feed(Input.El(x)) then one ends up with a Future[Iteratee[...]] which is not what fold wants. The great thing is that without Scala's type system I don't think I would have ever found the answer... :-) Mar 30 '13 at 14:49
0

Here is something I found handy,

def unfold[A,B](xs:Seq[A])(proc:A => Future[B])(implicit errorHandler:Throwable => B):Enumerator[B] = {
    Enumerator.unfoldM (xs) { xs =>
        if (xs.isEmpty) Future(None)
        else proc(xs.head) map (b => Some(xs.tail,b)) recover {
            case e => Some((xs.tail,errorHandler(e)))
        }
    }
}

def unfold[A,B](fxs:Future[Seq[A]])(proc:A => Future[B]) (implicit errorHandler1:Throwable => Seq[A], errorHandler:Throwable => B) :Enumerator[B] = {

    (unfold(Seq(fxs))(fxs => fxs)(errorHandler1)).flatMap(unfold(_)(proc)(errorHandler))
}

def unfoldFutures[A,B](xsfxs:Seq[Future[Seq[A]]])(proc:A => Future[B]) (implicit errorHandler1:Throwable => Seq[A], errorHandler:Throwable => B) :Enumerator[B] = {

    xsfxs.map(unfold(_)(proc)).reduceLeft((a,b) => a.andThen(b))
}
0

I would like to propose the use of a Broadcast

def seqToEnumerator[A](futuresA: Seq[Future[A]])(defaultValue: A, errorHandler: Throwable => A): Enumerator[A] ={
    val (enumerator, channel) = Concurrent.broadcast[A]
    futuresA.foreach(f => f.onComplete({
      case Success(Some(a: A)) => channel.push(a)
      case Success(None) => channel.push(defaultValue)
      case Failure(exception) => channel.push(errorHandler(exception))
    }))
    enumerator
  }

I added errorHandling and defaultValues but you can skip those by using onSuccess or onFailure, instead of onComplete

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.