1

Is it normal that the output varies when using multiple ordering columns and the order of those columns are varied?

For instance:

create table test_table (
    id int8 not null,
    year int4 not null,
    province varchar(16) not null,
    dangerous bool,
    sector varchar(9) not null,
    unit varchar(3) not null,
    amount numeric not null
);



insert into test_table (id, year, province, dangerous, sector, unit, amount) values (1, 2012, 'W_FL', true, 'FOTOG', 'TNE', 55);
insert into test_table (id, year, province, dangerous, sector, unit, amount) values (2, 2012, 'E_FL', true, 'CHEM', 'TNE', 54);
insert into test_table (id, year, province, dangerous, sector, unit, amount) values (3, 2012, 'W_FL', true, 'CHEM', 'TNE', 74);
insert into test_table (id, year, province, dangerous, sector, unit, amount) values (4, 2012, 'E_FL', true, 'FOTOG', 'TNE', 4);
insert into test_table (id, year, province, dangerous, sector, unit, amount) values (5, 2012, 'LIM', true, 'FOTOG', 'TNE', 4);

First query:

select
    * 
from
    test_table test 
where
    test.year=2012
order by
    test.province asc,
    test.sector asc 
limit 2;

Which outputs:

ID      YEAR    PROVINCE    DANGEROUS   SECTOR      UNIT    AMOUNT  
2       2012    E_FL        TRUE        CHEM        TNE     54
4       2012    E_FL        TRUE        FOTOG       TNE     4

Second query:

select
    * 
from
    test_table test 
where
    test.year=2012
order by
test.sector asc,
    test.province asc
limit 2;

This query returns something else:

ID      YEAR    PROVINCE    DANGEROUS   SECTOR      UNIT    AMOUNT 
2       2012    E_FL        TRUE        CHEM        TNE     54
3       2012    W_FL        TRUE        CHEM        TNE     74

It is as if only the second order by clause is used by the limit... Could someone verify my assumption that both queries should result in the same output?

  • 1
    If someone can verify that, then that someone is mistaken. – Strawberry Mar 21 '13 at 14:48
  • 1
    I don't see any problem with your results, its being ordered by the first order by condition – mk_89 Mar 21 '13 at 14:49
  • Indeed my assumption was wrong. – flume Mar 21 '13 at 15:01
1

If you remove the LIMIT 2 from the queries, you'll see the order:

First query

 ---- ------ ---------- ----------- -------- ------ -------- 
| id | year | province | dangerous | sector | unit | amount |
 ---- ------ ---------- ----------- -------- ------ -------- 
|  2 | 2012 | E_FL     |         1 | CHEM   | TNE  |     54 |
|  4 | 2012 | E_FL     |         1 | FOTOG  | TNE  |      4 |
|  5 | 2012 | LIM      |         1 | FOTOG  | TNE  |      4 |
|  3 | 2012 | W_FL     |         1 | CHEM   | TNE  |     74 |
|  1 | 2012 | W_FL     |         1 | FOTOG  | TNE  |     55 |
 ---- ------ ---------- ----------- -------- ------ -------- 

Second query

 ---- ------ ---------- ----------- -------- ------ -------- 
| id | year | province | dangerous | sector | unit | amount |
 ---- ------ ---------- ----------- -------- ------ -------- 
|  2 | 2012 | E_FL     |         1 | CHEM   | TNE  |     54 |
|  3 | 2012 | W_FL     |         1 | CHEM   | TNE  |     74 |
|  4 | 2012 | E_FL     |         1 | FOTOG  | TNE  |      4 |
|  5 | 2012 | LIM      |         1 | FOTOG  | TNE  |      4 |
|  1 | 2012 | W_FL     |         1 | FOTOG  | TNE  |     55 |
 ---- ------ ---------- ----------- -------- ------ -------- 

The second order by will never change the order of the first order by. It will just be applied to groups of rows in which the first order by had duplicated entries.

So, you'll have these distinct results from these two queries.

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