I am trying to call the method getFailureDialog() of the interface OnSelectedListener. The method is implemented in MainActivity.java. But when I call the method, I am getting the null pointer exception.

I know that its because OnSelectedListener is still not initialized and you are calling getFailureDialog() on uninitialized object. Obviously, interface methods are never initialized. But then how do I call the method getFailureDialog() from my class Common.java?

I am placing only the relevant source code below-

Source code:

SharedFragment.java

public class SharedFragment extends DialogFragment 
{       
    Bundle bundle = getArguments();
    final String email = bundle.getString("email");

    Thread t=new Thread(new Runnable() 
    {
        public void run() {
        common.myRecord(email);
    }
    });   t.start(); 
}

Common.java

public class Common
{
OnSelectedListener mCallback;


    public interface OnSelectedListener 
    {
        public void getFailureDialog();
    }

    public void myRecord(String email)
    {
        mCallback.getFailureDialog();  //null pointer exception here
    }
}

MainActivity.java

public class MainActivity implements Common.OnSelectedListener
{

@Override
    public void getFailureDialog()
    {

        RecordFailure fd = new RecordFailure(); 
        fd.show(getSupportFragmentManager(), "dialog");
    }
}

Error Log

03-22 15:50:39.032: W/dalvikvm(20796): threadid=16: thread exiting with uncaught exception (group=0x4204c450)
03-22 15:50:39.052: E/AndroidRuntime(20796): FATAL EXCEPTION: Thread-30126
03-22 15:50:39.052: E/AndroidRuntime(20796): java.lang.NullPointerException
03-22 15:50:39.052: E/AndroidRuntime(20796):    at com.cornmail.util.Common.myRecord(Common.java:2062)
up vote 7 down vote accepted
OnSelectedListener mCallback;

is never getting initialized, or is being initialized with a null value.

public class Common
{
    OnSelectedListener mCallback = new OnSelectedListener(){
        public void getFailureDialog(){
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "An Error Has Occurred.");
        }
    };


    public interface OnSelectedListener 
    {
        public void getFailureDialog();
    }

    public void myRecord(String email)
    {
        mCallback.getFailureDialog();  //now this works.
    }
}
  • yes that's true but can you give me idea that its a interface and how to initialize it? – My God Mar 22 '13 at 10:43
  • you cant initialize an interface, what a bad answer – Dion Dirza Mar 22 '13 at 10:47
  • @demongill sure you can. Just for example, you use new View.OnClickListener and ovveride the onClick() method. This is not the process of "initialization" in the common sense, but I think Kylar has just generalized that – Droidman Mar 22 '13 at 10:53
  • i never found interface with design like this as my experience. interface should be implemented 1st in other class before it being used by another class – Dion Dirza Mar 22 '13 at 10:56
  • 1
    Then you don't have enough experience. Initializing anonymous interface implementations is very very common in Swing. – Kylar Mar 22 '13 at 11:44

here is the source code for the OnSelectedListener. Since that is an interface, you have to initialize it using new and overriding the onSelected() method OR let your class implement this listener

add a method in

public class Common
{
    OnSelectedListener mCallback;

    public void setOnSelectedListener(OnSelectedListener listener){
        mCallback = listener;
    }

    public interface OnSelectedListener 
    {
        public void getFailureDialog();
    }

    public void myRecord(String email)
    {
        mCallback.getFailureDialog();  //null pointer exception here
    }
}

now use the setOnSelectedListener() to initialize your listener

but from you code you might need to implement another listener in your SharedFragment too.

You have to redesign your code man, make Common class implement OnSelectedListener interface. So separate OnSelectedListener as outer interface not as inner interface.

i will code it like this.

public interface OnSelectedListener 
{
    public void getFailureDialog();
}

then Common class should be like this

public class Common implements OnSelectedListener
{
    public void getFailureDialog()
    {
        RecordFailure fd = new RecordFailure(); 
        fd.show(getSupportFragmentManager(), "dialog");
    }

    public void myRecord(String email)
    {
        getFailureDialog();
        //do something more rather than just call existing method
    }
}

and this code will run smoothly. if you need to implement the getFailureDialog in MainActivity, make this Common class as abstract class.

Common class will be like this

public abstract class Common implements OnSelectedListener
{
    public abstract void getFailureDialog();

    public void myRecord(String email)
    {
        getFailureDialog();
        //do something more rather than just call existing method
    }
}

now your MainActivity class can extend from this class to implement the missing part.

  • I agree with you but there must be some way to call interface method which is implemented in some other class with the object name in our class so that when I do object.method() it will not give null pointer. – My God Mar 22 '13 at 11:14
  • Common class is the class that contains around 2000 lines of code with lots of implemented methods. It can't be abstract. – My God Mar 22 '13 at 11:23
  • lets wait for other answer then, cause i would design my code like this. Why do u have to design such a mechanism like this? Is there existing API Library that coded like this, give me some point. I'll love to do some research. Abstract class can have implemented method in it, but it can be instantiated. Have you ever use abstract class before? – Dion Dirza Mar 22 '13 at 11:24
  • the main idea to use such mechanism is that - there are lots of interfaces throughout the application with only few methods. So its awkward to create class for every interface having such a small code. Putting it inside a class is the better idea and was recommended. – My God Mar 22 '13 at 11:31
  • the other reason is - I have all the implemented methods of every interface in a single class which is MainActivity.java so that it is easy to know that the implemented methods belong to this class and you don't have to search every time that where is the implementation of any method of interface. – My God Mar 22 '13 at 11:39

You need to modify Common and MainActivity. In Common add a basic constructor. Then activate the callback as shown in startMyCallback.

Common.java

public class Common
{

 public Common() {}

 OnSelectedListener mCallback;


 public interface OnSelectedListener 
 {
    public void getFailureDialog();
 }

 public void myRecord(String email)
 {
    mCallback.getFailureDialog();  //null pointer exception here
 }
}

MainActivity.java

public class MainActivity implements Common.OnSelectedListener
{

    Common common = new Common();

    public MainActivity()
    {

    }

    public void startMyCallback()
    {
        common.mCallback = this;
    }

    @Override
    public void getFailureDialog()
    {
        RecordFailure fd = new RecordFailure(); 
        fd.show(getSupportFragmentManager(), "dialog");
    }
}

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