4

This question already has an answer here:

I have string that displays date and time in the following format:

Thu Jan 03 15:04:29 2013

How would I convert this to a DateTime? I have tried:

string strDateStarted = "Thu Jan 03 15:04:29 2013"
DateTime datDateStarted = Convert.ToDateTime(strDateStarted);

But this does not work. In my program this value is read in from a log file so I am not able to change the format of the text string.

marked as duplicate by J. Steen, Soner Gönül, Mike Perrenoud, joce, Anand Shah Mar 23 '13 at 5:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3

Use following code :

string strDateStarted = "Thu Jan 03 15:04:29 2013";           
DateTime datDateStarted;
DateTime.TryParseExact(strDateStarted, new string[] { "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy" }, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, System.Globalization.DateTimeStyles.None, out datDateStarted);
Console.WriteLine(datDateStarted);

and sure if time is in 24 HRS format , then use HH. More details

  • That worked perfectly! – TroggleDorf Mar 22 '13 at 13:24
8

Use one of the *Parse* methods defined on DateTime.

Either TryParseExact or ParseExact which will take a format string corresponding to the date string.

I suggest reading up on Custom Date and Time Format Strings.

In this case, the corresponding format string would be:

"ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy"

To be used:

DateTime.ParseExact("Thu Jan 03 15:04:29 2013", 
                    "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy", 
                    CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)
  • hh is a 12-hour format – Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 22 '13 at 12:58
  • @lazyberezovsky - Yep, thanks. – Oded Mar 22 '13 at 12:58
3

Try using DateTime.ParseExact.

in your case the format specified should be:

Thu Jan 03 15:04:29 2013

and the call should look like:

DateTime logDate = DateTime.ParseExact(logValue, "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy",
                                     CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("en-US"));

The third parameter is set to the US culture, so that the ddd and MMM parts, correspond to Thu and Jan respectively.


In this case I'm recommending ParseExact instead of TryParseExact, because of the source of the data. If you are parsing user input, always use TryParseExact, because you cannot trust that the user followed the requested format. However, in this case, the source is a file with a well defined format, so any invalid data should be treated as exception, because they are, well, exceptional.

Also note that *ParseExact methods are very unforgiving. If the data does not exactly conform to the format specified, it's treated as an error.

  • Thanks for the reply! Yours didn't quite work, but Arshad's suggestion of: DateTime.TryParseExact(strDateStarted, new string[] { "ddd MMM dd HH:mm:ss yyyy" }, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, System.Globalization.DateTimeStyles.None, out datDateStarted); worked. – TroggleDorf Mar 22 '13 at 13:23
0

Have a look at DateTime.TryParse()

0
string yourDateTimeRepresentation = "R"; //for example
DateTime dt = DateTime.ParseExact(strDateStarted , yourDateTimeRepresentation , System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.