I need to have a class constructor in PHP call its parent's parent's (grandparent?) constructor without calling the parent constructor.

// main class that everything inherits
class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {

    }

}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // call Grandpa's constructor
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // THIS IS WHERE I NEED TO CALL GRANDPA'S
        // CONSTRUCTOR AND NOT PAPA'S
    }
}

I know this is a bizarre thing to do and I'm attempting to find a means that doesn't smell bad but nonetheless, I'm curious if it's possible.

EDIT

I thought I should post the rationale for the chosen answer. The reason being; it most elegant solutionto the problem of wanting to call the "grandparent's" constructor while retaining all the values. It's certainly not the best approach nor is it OOP friendly, but that's not what the question was asking.

For anyone coming across this question at a later date - Please find another solution. I was able to find a much better approach that didn't wreak havoc on the class structure. So should you.

  • Is there a reason you can't just instantiate Grandpa inside of Kiddo's construct? – Mark Oct 13 '09 at 0:16
  • The Grampa constructor sets properties for itself that are inherited by its children. Papa does some stuff in it's constructor that will mess up Kiddo. So I need the call to Grandpa constructor to set properties for Kiddo during construction. – Paulo Oct 13 '09 at 0:20
  • 3
    Then shouldn't Kiddo extend from Grandpa and not Papa. – MitMaro Oct 13 '09 at 0:26
  • 4
    @MitMaro. I agree and I actually solved my actual problem by creating an intermediate class that extended Grandpa. Then both Papa and Kiddo extended that class. Kiddo required some intermediate functionality of Papa but didn't like it's constructor so the class has that additional functionality and both extend it. – Paulo Oct 13 '09 at 0:36
  • 2
    A perfect solution. You should post it as an answer. – MitMaro Oct 13 '09 at 0:39

15 Answers 15

up vote 122 down vote accepted

The ugly workaround would be to pass a boolean param to Papa indicating that you do not wish to parse the code contained in it's constructor. i.e:

// main class that everything inherits
class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {

    }

}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct($bypass = false)
    {
        // only perform actions inside if not bypassing
        if (!$bypass) {

        }
        // call Grandpa's constructor
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $bypassPapa = true;
        parent::__construct($bypassPapa);
    }
}
  • 13
    good workaround, but it is not acceptable if the parent class comes from some external library wish you with to extend. I like the too much php answer below. – Kostanos Jul 11 '13 at 15:26

You must use Grandpa::__construct(), there's no other shortcut for it. Also, this ruins the encapsulation of the Papa class - when reading or working on Papa, it should be safe to assume that the __construct() method will be called during construction, but the Kiddo class does not do this.

  • 2
    No, it works as expected. – too much php Oct 13 '09 at 0:54
  • Can't understand how. Declaring __construct as static results in the following error for me "Fatal error: Constructor Grandpa::__construct() cannot be static" under PHP5.3 – Mark Oct 13 '09 at 4:08
  • When I tried it, I didn't declare it as static. I created the class structure normally but instead of calling parent::__construct(), I called Grandpa::__construct() and it worked. I doesn't seem right to me either but this whole question got kinda weird. – Paulo Oct 13 '09 at 4:25
  • 11
    Agreed. I use this all the time - you can call a class by it's name, not just via the magic names of parent or self. I have been known to go three or four classes deep. In fact, I've started referring to my base class by it's name rather than using parent, that way I'm sure I'm getting the right object, always. – EvilChookie Nov 9 '11 at 0:20
  • EvilChookie`s solusion is the best. Should be the approved answer. Than you Chookie! – nicksona Sep 28 '16 at 13:21
class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {}
}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        //call Grandpa's constructor
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        //this is not a bug, it works that way in php
        Grandpa::__construct();
    }
}
  • Personally I wouldn't choose to do this as it means Papa's contractor won't get called at all. I'd go with something like cballou's approach (i.e. of passing an argument to Papa's constructor and having it invoke it's parents constructor or not based on that). – Iain Collins Apr 6 '12 at 23:42
  • The situation we are in here is in such a way that we need to skip the parent's logic and in most of the cases we can't change the grandparent or the parent classes. I believe this is the best way to do it as there are changes made only in the child. The only issue is that it might throw an E_STRICT notice link, it didn't for me though when I tested it. – mimarcel Jul 15 '13 at 10:06
  • This is an interesting solution, however, if you really don't need the logic of the parent's constructor, are you sure that you are really making a subsclass of a parent? – v010dya Dec 26 '17 at 14:22
  • This is the correct answer. While it may seem silly to inherit Papa but you want to call the GrandPa constructor without Papa, I've found it useful to be do. I want to keep the hierarchy, but I need to do a clean Kiddo constructor that doesn't have anything to do with Papa, but still want the benefits of using what's going on in GrandPa's constructor. Maybe Papa is doing a bunch of junk in the constructor that isn't needed or wanted by Kiddo, but it still has useful components. – Halfstop Mar 13 at 18:24

I ended up coming up with an alternative solution that solved the problem.

  • I created an intermediate class that extended Grandpa.
  • Then both Papa and Kiddo extended that class.
  • Kiddo required some intermediate functionality of Papa but didn't like it's constructor so the class has that additional functionality and both extend it.

I've upvoted the other two answers that provided valid yet ugly solutions for an uglier question:)

  • 3
    I think the better idea here is to break the functionality you are trying to use out of the constructed and into a protected method. Then you can call that method from a constructor selectively – xximjasonxx Jun 14 '10 at 2:56
  • This does not answer the exact question you've phrased. This happens if the real world muddies up something which should be clear and confined. It's a pity for this question. – nalply Aug 20 '12 at 8:17

Another option that doesn't use a flag and might work in your situation:

<?php
// main class that everything inherits
class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct(){
        $this->GrandpaSetup();
    }

    public function GrandpaSetup(){
        $this->prop1 = 'foo';
        $this->prop2 = 'bar';
    }
}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // call Grandpa's constructor
        parent::__construct();
        $this->prop1 = 'foobar';
    }

}
class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->GrandpaSetup();
    }
}

$kid = new Kiddo();
echo "{$kid->prop1}\n{$kid->prop2}\n";

Beautiful solution using Reflection.

<?php
class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo "Grandpa's constructor called\n";
    }

}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo "Papa's constructor called\n";

        // call Grandpa's constructor
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo "Kiddo's constructor called\n";

        $reflectionMethod = new ReflectionMethod(get_parent_class(get_parent_class($this)), '__construct');
        $reflectionMethod->invoke($this);
    }
}

$kiddo = new Kiddo();
$papa = new Papa();

I agree with "too much php", try this:

class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo 'Grandpa<br/>';
    }

}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo 'Papa<br/>';
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // THIS IS WHERE I NEED TO CALL GRANDPA'S
        // CONSTRUCTOR AND NOT PAPA'S
        echo 'Kiddo<br/>';
        Grandpa::__construct();
    }
}

$instance = new Kiddo;

I got the result as expected:

Kiddo

Grandpa

This is a feature not a bug, check this for your reference:

https://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=42016

It is just the way it works. If it sees it is coming from the right context this call version does not enforce a static call.

Instead it will simply keep $this and be happy with it.

parent::method() works in the same way, you don't have to define the method as static but it can be called in the same context. Try this out for more interesting:

class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo 'Grandpa<br/>';
        Kiddo::hello();
    }

}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo 'Papa<br/>';
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // THIS IS WHERE I NEED TO CALL GRANDPA'S
        // CONSTRUCTOR AND NOT PAPA'S
        echo 'Kiddo<br/>';
        Grandpa::__construct();
    }

    public function hello()
    {
        echo 'Hello<br/>';
    }
}

$instance = new Kiddo;

It also works as expected:

Kiddo

Grandpa

Hello

But if you try to initialize a new Papa, you will get an E_STRICT error:

$papa = new Papa;

Strict standards: Non-static method Kiddo::hello() should not be called statically, assuming $this from incompatible context

You can use instanceof to determine if you can call a Children::method() in a parent method:

if ($this instanceof Kiddo) Kiddo::hello();
  • 1
    Just remember that parent is only a shortcut to whatever first parent that implemented the method… Thus from a descendant calling AscendantName::method works and from an ascendant calling static::method will always call the latest generation that implemented the method. And you may check not to call yourself using (get_class($this)==__CLASS__?'Healthy people dont\'t call themself…':'Calling latest') if you'd like parents to call kid methods (seems strange but might be usefull combined with private function and __call magic function )… – llange Oct 30 '15 at 21:44

There's an easier solution for this, but it requires that you know exactly how much inheritance your current class has gone through. Fortunately, get_parent_class()'s arguments allow your class array member to be the class name as a string as well as an instance itself.

Bear in mind that this also inherently relies on calling a class' __construct() method statically, though within the instanced scope of an inheriting object the difference in this particular case is negligible (ah, PHP).

Consider the following:

class Foo {
    var $f = 'bad (Foo)';

    function __construct() {
        $this->f = 'Good!';
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    var $f = 'bad (Bar)';
}

class FooBar extends Bar {
    var $f = 'bad (FooBar)';

    function __construct() {
        # FooBar constructor logic here
        call_user_func(array(get_parent_class(get_parent_class($this)), '__construct'));
    }
}

$foo = new FooBar();
echo $foo->f; #=> 'Good!'

Again, this isn't a viable solution for a situation where you have no idea how much inheritance has taken place, due to the limitations of debug_backtrace(), but in controlled circumstances, it works as intended.

You can call Grandpa::__construct from where you want and the $this keyword will refer to your current class instance. But be carefull with this method you cannot access to protected properties and methods of current instance from this other context, only to public elements. => All work and officialy supported.

Example

// main class that everything inherits
class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo $this->one; // will print 1
        echo $this->two; // error cannot access protected property
    }

}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // call Grandpa's constructor
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public $one = 1;
    protected $two = 2;
    public function __construct()
    {
        Grandpa::__construct();
    }
}

new Kiddo();

Funny detail about php: extended classes can use non-static functions of a parent class in a static matter. Outside you will get a strict error.

error_reporting(E_ALL);

class GrandPa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        print("construct grandpa<br/>");
        $this->grandPaFkt();
    }

    protected function grandPaFkt(){
        print(">>do Grandpa<br/>");
    }
}

class Pa extends GrandPa
{
    public function __construct()
    {   parent::__construct();
        print("construct Pa <br/>");
    }

    public function paFkt(){
        print(">>do Pa <br>");
    }
}

class Child extends Pa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        GrandPa::__construct();
        Pa::paFkt();//allright
        //parent::__construct();//whatever you want
        print("construct Child<br/>");
    }

}

$test=new Child();
$test::paFkt();//strict error 

So inside a extended class (Child) you can use

parent::paFkt(); 

or

Pa::paFkt();

to access a parent (or grandPa's) (not private) function.

Outside class def

$test::paFkt();

will trow strict error (non static function).

Ok, Yet another ugly solution:

Create a function in Papa like:

protected function call2Granpa() {
     return parent::__construct();
}

Then in Kiddo you use:

parent::call2Granpa(); //instead of calling constructor in Papa.

I think it could work... I haven't test it, so I'm not sure if the objects are created correctly.

I used this approach but with non-constructor functions.

<?php

class grand_pa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo "Hey I am Grand Pa <br>";
    }
}

class pa_pa extends grand_pa
{
    // no need for construct here unless you want to do something specifically within this class as init stuff
    // the construct for this class will be inherited from the parent.
}

class kiddo extends pa_pa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        parent::__construct();
        echo "Hey I am a child <br>";
    }
}

new kiddo();
?>

Of course this expects you do not need to do anything within the construct of the pa_pa. Running this will output :

Hey I am Grand Pa Hey I am a child

// main class that everything inherits
class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->___construct();
    }

    protected function ___construct()
    {
        // grandpa's logic
    }

}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        // call Grandpa's constructor
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        parent::___construct();
    }
}

note that "___construct" is not some magic name, you can call it "doGrandpaStuff".

    class Grandpa 
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        echo"Hello Kiddo";
    }    
}

class Papa extends Grandpa
{
    public function __construct()
    {            
    }
    public function CallGranddad()
    {
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

class Kiddo extends Papa
{
    public function __construct()
    {

    }
    public function needSomethingFromGrandDad
    {
       parent::CallGranddad();
    }
}

from php 7 u can use

parent::parent::__construct();

  • I can't seem to reproduce this: 3v4l.org/22YAQ#output – Wouter0100 Jan 5 at 13:22
  • @Wouter0100 lala977 did say "From PHP 7" which your link is using 5.6 – Travis Weston Jan 12 at 17:56
  • @TravisWeston please recheck my link. it tests that peace of code against all versions. 5.6 up to 7.2 reproduce the same error, while other runtimes return some different errors. – Wouter0100 Jan 12 at 21:47

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