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I'm building an app in ASP.NET MVC 4 using Entity Framework Code First, and for simplicity I'm inheriting all models that will be stored in the database from a BaseEntity that has a Guid, a DateCreated, a LastEditDate and a other useful properties like that. Now, I know that I can tell EF to map these inherited properties like so:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<User>().Map(m =>
    {
        m.MapInheritedProperties();
    });

    modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Map(m =>
    {
        m.MapInheritedProperties();
    });            
}

It seems silly to have to do this for every item, though. Is there a way I can apply this rule to all entities in one?

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    It will map all inherited properties (unless you specify [NotMapped]) automatically. You don't need to do anything extra.
    – Artless
    Mar 22, 2013 at 19:52
  • That's odd... I'm not seeing the BaseEntity properties in the database. Mar 22, 2013 at 22:26
  • Turn the PC off, turn it on again, and oh look, properties mapped. No idea what happened there, but thanks for the help, everyone. Mar 23, 2013 at 10:06

2 Answers 2

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Such a mapping - called Table-Per-Concrete-Type (TPC) inheritance mapping - only makes sense if you really want to leverage polymorphism, for example if you want to load a list of say 10 BaseEntity objects and expect that the actual type gets materialized so that the list contains 3 User entities and 7 Product entities.

Would such a query ever have any business relevance in your application? Looking at your BaseEntity I can only see that querying all objects that - for example - have been created at a specific date, no matter which type the object has (if it's derived from BaseEntity), could be useful. Do you need that? Also keep in mind how complex such a query would be. The SQL must query for almost all tables in your database and then union the result.

I would use inheritance mapping only if it has a real business meaning (for instance: Person which has meaningful properties like address, phone, email, etc. on its own and Employee that is derived from Person and adds a Salary and HiredDate property, etc.).

In your case I would use the BaseEntity only as a base type of your entity classes and don't specify any mapping at all for this class. EF will still map the inherited properties, but as part of the User and Product entity, etc., not as its own entity. I wouldn't even call it "Base Entity" but ... I don't know... maybe EntityBase (meaning: the base (class) of all entities, but not an entity itself).

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  • Totally agree with this. I would not even use a base type but an interface (even though it's lots more work), but that's just an opinion. Mar 22, 2013 at 21:18
  • Re BaseEntity vs EntityBase, I'm just in the habit of prefixing (like interface IFoo). There are places I'll be using the polymorphism - for example, I can retrieve Articles and Comments together to get all things written by a User, and I can merge AuditRecord and DebugRecord depending on whether the user has privileges to see each (one is for accountability, one is for troubleshooting). It lets me pass a Video, Image, or Sound to a page that takes a more abstract ContentElement... there are numerous scenarios. EntityBase saves me from endlessly re-implementing the same things on all objects. Mar 22, 2013 at 22:33
  • 2
    Also, using an EntityBase means I can specify my Repository methods as (for example) T Get<T>(int ID) where T : EntityBase because EntityBase has an int ID property, but if T : class I wouldn't be able to do that. This makes it much easier for me to use a nice generic repository - one for all objects, rather than having to re-implement near-identical CRUD methods for all objects. As you may have noticed, I really don't like writing the same code multiple times :P Mar 22, 2013 at 22:35
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It has been stated correctly that it's not necessary to do global mapping in this specific case, because EF will map the properties for each individual type as long as you don't make BaseEntity part of the model.

But your question title is stated more generally and yes, it is possible to specify global mapping rules if you configure the mappings by EntityTypeConfigurations. It could look like this:

// Base configuration.
public abstract class BaseMapping<T> : EntityTypeConfiguration<T>
  where T : BaseEntity
{
  protected BaseMapping()
  {
    this.Map(m => m.MapInheritedProperties()); // OK, not necessary, but
                                               // just an example
  }
}

// Specific configurations
public class UserMapping : BaseMapping<User>
{ }

public class ProductMapping : BaseMapping<Product>
{ }

public class TempModelsContext : DbContext
{
  // Add the configurations to the model builder.
  protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
  {
    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
    modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new UserMapping());
    modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new ProductMapping());
  }

  // DbSets
  ...
}

NOTE:

As of Entity Framework 6 some of these mappings can also be solved by custom code first conventions: http://romiller.com/2013/01/29/ef6-code-first-configuring-unmapped-base-types/

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  • Maybe Property(b => b.DateCreated).HasColumnType("datetime2") is an example to show a base type mapping without making the base type a real entity with all the EF inheritance stuff. I am not even sure, but I believe that MapInheritedProperties would make BaseEntity an entity, i.e. context.Set<BaseEntity>() is a valid set and adds complexity to the internal EF model, while it is invalid with a simple property mapping.
    – Slauma
    Mar 22, 2013 at 21:39

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