27

I have a data file with columns like

BBP1   0.000000  -0.150000    2.033000  0.00 -0.150   1.77

and the individual columns are separated by a varying number of whitespaces.

My goal is to read in those lines, do some math on several rows, for example multiplying column 4 by .95, and write them out to a new file. The new file should look like the original one, except for the values that I modified.

My approach would be reading in the lines as items of a list. And then I would use split() on those rows I am interested in, which will give me a sublist with the individual column values. Then I do the modification, join() the columns together and write the lines from the list to a new text file.

The problem is that I have those varying amount of whitespaces. I don't know how to introduce them back in the same way I read them in. The only way I could think of is to count characters in the line before I split them, which would be very tedious. Does someone have a better idea to tackle this problem?

  • if the file is in a fixed format then using the same number of spaces can change column widths. You could use string formatting to preserve the file format e.g., "{:4s} {:10.6f} {:10.6f} {:11.6f} {:5.2f} {:6.3f} {:6.2f}".format(*row), where row = ["BBP1", 0.0, -0.15, 0.95*2.033, 0.0, -0.15, 1.77]. – jfs Mar 22 '13 at 21:55
34

You want to use re.split() in that case, with a group:

re.split(r'(\s+)', line)

would return both the columns and the whitespace so you can rejoin the line later with the same amount of whitespace included.

Example:

>>> re.split(r'(\s+)', line)
['BBP1', '   ', '0.000000', '  ', '-0.150000', '    ', '2.033000', '  ', '0.00', ' ', '-0.150', '   ', '1.77']

You probably do want to remove the newline from the end.

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  • To consistently handle whitespace at the beginning and/or end, a better pattern is (\S+) – Mike T Nov 20 '18 at 2:02
  • @MikeT: the downside of that is that if there is no whitespace at the start or end you get an empty '' string for those. – Martijn Pieters Nov 20 '18 at 7:55
  • splitting (\S+) always has non-word strings at start and end, which is a predictable upside from my perspective. – Mike T Nov 20 '18 at 21:58
4

Other way to do this is:

s = 'BBP1   0.000000  -0.150000    2.033000  0.00 -0.150   1.77'
s.split(' ')
>>> ['BBP1', '', '', '0.000000', '', '-0.150000', '', '', '', '2.033000', '', '0.00', '-0.150', '', '', '1.77']

If we specify space character argument in split function, it creates list without eating successive space characters. So, original numbers of space characters are restored after 'join' function.

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  • well, this is awesome. Didnt know about passing space character expicitly gives the required result. Thank you @Gaurav – Sumanth Lingappa 2 days ago
3

For lines that have whitespace at the beginning and/or end, a more robust pattern is (\S+) to split at non-whitespace characters:

import re

line1 = ' 4   426.2   orange\n'
line2 = '12    82.1   apple\n'

re_S = re.compile(r'(\S+)')
items1 = re_S.split(line1)
items2 = re_S.split(line2)
print(items1)  # [' ', '4', '   ', '426.2', '   ', 'orange', '\n']
print(items2)  # ['', '12', '    ', '82.1', '   ', 'apple', '\n']

These two lines have the same number of items after splitting, which is handy. The first and last items are always whitespace strings. These lines can be reconstituted using a join with a zero-length string:

print(repr(''.join(items1)))  # ' 4   426.2   orange\n'
print(repr(''.join(items2)))  # '12    82.1   apple\n'

To contrast the example with a similar pattern (\s+) (lower-case) used in the other answer here, each line splits with different result lengths and positions of the items:

re_s = re.compile(r'(\s+)')
print(re_s.split(line1))  # ['', ' ', '4', '    ', '20.0', '   ', 'orange', '\n', '']
print(re_s.split(line2))  # ['12', '    ', '82.1', '   ', 'apple', '\n', '']

As you can see, this would be a bit more difficult to process in a consistent manner.

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