45

I'm interested in finding the nth row of pascal triangle (not a specific element but the whole row itself). What would be the most efficient way to do it?

I thought about the conventional way to construct the triangle by summing up the corresponding elements in the row above which would take:

1 + 2 + .. + n = O(n^2)

Another way could be using the combination formula of a specific element:

c(n, k) = n! / (k!(n-k)!)

for each element in the row which I guess would take more time the the former method depending on the way to calculate the combination. Any ideas?

10
  • 2
    THe first method you propose is mathematical nonsense, so definitely the second. – Pieter Geerkens Mar 22 '13 at 21:42
  • @PieterGeerkens Actually I was hoping to get below these two methods – none Mar 22 '13 at 21:43
  • 7
    uh, a series of additions is O(n). Unless you're REALLY bad at addition, I suppose... – Marc B Mar 22 '13 at 21:43
  • The second algorithm is O(n), and since there are n elements, probably you cannot get any faster than this. – zw324 Mar 22 '13 at 21:44
  • @MarcB what do you mean? are you talking about the first method? – none Mar 22 '13 at 21:44

14 Answers 14

103
>>> def pascal(n):
...   line = [1]
...   for k in range(n):
...     line.append(line[k] * (n-k) / (k+1))
...   return line
... 
>>> pascal(9)
[1, 9, 36, 84, 126, 126, 84, 36, 9, 1]

This uses the following identity:

C(n,k+1) = C(n,k) * (n-k) / (k+1)

So you can start with C(n,0) = 1 and then calculate the rest of the line using this identity, each time multiplying the previous element by (n-k) / (k+1).

7
  • 1
    can you eloborate on the answer a little bit? results seem correct and complexity is I guess O(n) but how does this work? – none Mar 22 '13 at 21:52
  • 70
    @H2CO3: That's the most efficient way for me to write the answer ;-) – Omri Barel Mar 22 '13 at 22:01
  • 1
    here is a slightly wordier explanation en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – jm0 Dec 23 '13 at 20:36
  • Translating this to JS doesn't work... ``` const pascal = n => { let line = [1]; for (k in _.range(n)) { line.push(line[k] * (n-k) / (k+1)); } return line; }; ``` Anyone realize why? – Nima Mehanian Feb 2 '18 at 10:05
  • @NimaMehanian JS for-in loops iterate property names, which are strings; they do not iterate indices, and thus definitely not values. Use the for-of loop instead: const pascal = n => { const line = [1]; for (const k of L.range(n)) { line.push(line[k] * (n-k) / (k+1)); } return line; }; – Joseph Sikorski Jul 7 '18 at 21:32
13

A single row can be calculated as follows:

First compute 1.               -> N choose 0
Then N/1                       -> N choose 1
Then N*(N-1)/1*2               -> N choose 2
Then N*(N-1)*(N-2)/1*2*3       -> N choose 3
.....

Notice that you can compute the next value from the previous value, by just multipyling by a single number and then dividing by another number.

This can be done in a single loop. Sample python.

def comb_row(n):
   r = 0
   num = n
   cur = 1
   yield cur
   while r <= n:
      r += 1  
      cur = (cur* num)/r
      yield cur
      num -= 1
4
  • you're talking about the second method I mention in the question. I don't see anything related to efficiency in your answer. – none Mar 22 '13 at 21:50
  • @gokcehan: No. Did you check out the code? It is essentially the same as the answer you selected! – Knoothe Mar 22 '13 at 22:00
  • now that I understand the algorithm, I see this is also the correct answer. sorry for that, you got my +1 – none Mar 22 '13 at 22:01
  • @gokcehan: No worries. I could have been clearer (and have edited the post to make it so). – Knoothe Mar 22 '13 at 22:08
9

The most efficient approach would be:

std::vector<int> pascal_row(int n){
    std::vector<int> row(n+1);
    row[0] = 1; //First element is always 1
    for(int i=1; i<n/2+1; i++){ //Progress up, until reaching the middle value
        row[i] = row[i-1] * (n-i+1)/i;
    }
    for(int i=n/2+1; i<=n; i++){ //Copy the inverse of the first part
        row[i] = row[n-i];
    }
    return row;
}
6
  • 1
    The row must have n+1 elements, so the last for should have the i<=n condition. – Bianca Daniciuc Oct 12 '14 at 22:04
  • I don't really remember the algorithm. But I guess you are right, since row.resize(n+1). – DarkZeros Oct 14 '14 at 10:33
  • Why have you multiplied row[i-1] with (n-i+1)/i? – user248884 Mar 31 '18 at 21:32
  • Each value is the previous one multiplied by (n-i) and divided by i. This comes from the factorial expansion, each term is very similar to the previous one, with 1 extra/1 less term in the lower part of the factorial. So for line 10 (9 if you count line 0) first is 10/1, then 9/2, then 8/3... and so on. Which produces 1,10,45,120,210,252 – DarkZeros Apr 3 '18 at 9:45
  • This fails when n is 30, basically large numbers. – Adam Mendoza Nov 19 '18 at 1:47
3

here is a fast example implemented in go-lang that calculates from the outer edges of a row and works it's way to the middle assigning two values with a single calculation...

package main

import "fmt"

func calcRow(n int) []int {
    // row always has n + 1 elements
    row := make( []int, n + 1, n + 1 )

    // set the edges
    row[0], row[n] = 1, 1

    // calculate values for the next n-1 columns
    for i := 0; i < int(n / 2) ; i++ {
        x := row[ i ] * (n - i) / (i + 1)

        row[ i + 1 ], row[ n - 1 - i ] = x, x
    }

    return row
}

func main() {
    for n := 0; n < 20; n++ {
        fmt.Printf("n = %d, row = %v\n", n, calcRow( n ))
    }
}

the output for 20 iterations takes about 1/4 millisecond to run...

n = 0, row = [1]
n = 1, row = [1 1]
n = 2, row = [1 2 1]
n = 3, row = [1 3 3 1]
n = 4, row = [1 4 6 4 1]
n = 5, row = [1 5 10 10 5 1]
n = 6, row = [1 6 15 20 15 6 1]
n = 7, row = [1 7 21 35 35 21 7 1]
n = 8, row = [1 8 28 56 70 56 28 8 1]
n = 9, row = [1 9 36 84 126 126 84 36 9 1]
n = 10, row = [1 10 45 120 210 252 210 120 45 10 1]
n = 11, row = [1 11 55 165 330 462 462 330 165 55 11 1]
n = 12, row = [1 12 66 220 495 792 924 792 495 220 66 12 1]
n = 13, row = [1 13 78 286 715 1287 1716 1716 1287 715 286 78 13 1]
n = 14, row = [1 14 91 364 1001 2002 3003 3432 3003 2002 1001 364 91 14 1]
n = 15, row = [1 15 105 455 1365 3003 5005 6435 6435 5005 3003 1365 455 105 15 1]
n = 16, row = [1 16 120 560 1820 4368 8008 11440 12870 11440 8008 4368 1820 560 120 16 1]
n = 17, row = [1 17 136 680 2380 6188 12376 19448 24310 24310 19448 12376 6188 2380 680 136 17 1]
n = 18, row = [1 18 153 816 3060 8568 18564 31824 43758 48620 43758 31824 18564 8568 3060 816 153 18 1]
n = 19, row = [1 19 171 969 3876 11628 27132 50388 75582 92378 92378 75582 50388 27132 11628 3876 969 171 19 1]
1
  • Why is row[i] multiplied with (n - i) / (i + 1). Is this a binomial identity? – user248884 Apr 1 '18 at 11:37
2

An easy way to calculate it is by noticing that the element of the next row can be calculated as a sum of two consecutive elements in the previous row.

[1, 5, 10, 10, 5, 1]
[1, 6, 15, 20, 15, 6, 1]

For example 6 = 5 + 1, 15 = 5 + 10, 1 = 1 + 0 and 20 = 10 + 10. This gives a simple algorithm to calculate the next row from the previous one.

def pascal(n):
    row = [1]
    for x in xrange(n):
        row = [l + r for l, r in zip(row + [0], [0] + row)]
    # print row
    return row

print pascal(10)
2

In Scala Programming: i would have done it as simple as this:

def pascal(c: Int, r: Int): Int = c match {
    case 0 => 1
    case `c` if c >= r => 1
    case _ => pascal(c-1, r-1)+pascal(c, r-1)
}

I would call it inside this:

for (row <- 0 to 10) {
    for (col <- 0 to row)
        print(pascal(col, row) + " ")
    println()
}

resulting to:

. 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 6 4 1 1 5 10 10 5 1 1 6 15 20 15 6 1 1 7 21 35 35 21 7 1 1 8 28 56 70 56 28 8 1 1 9 36 84 126 126 84 36 9 1 1 10 45 120 210 252 210 120 45 10 1

To explain step by step:

Step 1: We make sure that if our column is the first one we always return figure 1.

Step 2: Since each X-th row there are X number of columns. So we say that; the last column X is greater than or equal to X-th row, then the return figure 1.

Step 3: Otherwise, we get the sum of the repeated pascal of the column just before the current one and the row just before the current one ; and the pascal of that column and the row just before the current one.

Good Luck.

1
  • Care to comment about the time and memory required to compute the row n? How does this compare to approaches presented before? Does anything change if multiplication took 31 times as long as addition? – greybeard Nov 12 '16 at 1:09
1

Let me build upon Shane's excellent work for an R solution. (Thank you, Shane!. His code for generating the triangle:

pascalTriangle <- function(h) {
  lapply(0:h, function(i) choose(i, 0:i)) 
}

This will allow one to store the triangle as a list. We can then index whatever row desired. But please add 1 when indexing! For example, I'll grab the bottom row:

pt_with_24_rows <- pascalTriangle(24)
row_24 <- pt_with_24_rows[25] # add one
row_24[[1]] # prints the row

output

So, finally, make-believe I have a Galton Board problem. I have the arbitrary challenge of finding out percentage of beans have clustered in the center: say, bins 10 to 15 (out of 25).

sum(row_24[[1]][10:15])/sum(row_24[[1]]) 

Which turns out to be 0.7704771. All good!

0

The most efficient way to calculate a row in pascal's triangle is through convolution. First we chose the second row (1,1) to be a kernel and then in order to get the next row we only need to convolve curent row with the kernel.

So convolution of the kernel with second row gives third row [1 1]*[1 1] = [1 2 1], convolution with the third row gives fourth [1 2 1]*[1 1] = [1 3 3 1] and so on

This is a function in julia-lang (very simular to matlab):

function binomRow(n::Int64)
baseVector = [1] #the first row is equal to 1. 
kernel = [1,1]   #This is the second row and a kernel. 
row = zeros(n)
for i = 1 : n
    row = baseVector 
    baseVector = conv(baseVector, kernel) #convoltion with kernel
end
return row::Array{Int64,1}
end
1
  • Haven't debugged it why, but above binoRow(59) it begins to yield negative numbers and throws ERROR: InexactError() above binomRow(66) – karatedog Dec 10 '16 at 22:28
0

In Ruby, the following code will print out the specific row of Pascals Triangle that you want:

def row(n)
  pascal = [1]
  if n < 1
    p pascal
    return pascal
  else
    n.times do |num|
      nextNum = ((n - num)/(num.to_f + 1)) * pascal[num]
      pascal << nextNum.to_i
    end
  end
  p pascal
end

Where calling row(0) returns [1] and row(5) returns [1, 5, 10, 10, 5, 1]

0

Here is the another best and simple way to design a Pascal Triangle dynamically using VBA.

`1
11
121
1331
14641`

`Sub pascal()
Dim book As Excel.Workbook
Dim sht As Worksheet
Set book = ThisWorkbook
Set sht = book.Worksheets("sheet1")
a = InputBox("Enter the Number", "Fill")
For i = 1 To a
    For k = 1 To i
        If i >= 2 And k >= 2 Then
            sht.Cells(i, k).Value = sht.Cells(i - 1, k - 1) + sht.Cell(i-  1, k)
        Else
            sht.Cells(i, k).Value = 1
        End If
    Next k
Next i
End Sub`
0

I used Ti-84 Plus CE

The use of –> in line 6 is the store value button

Forloop syntax is 
:For(variable, beginning, end [, increment])
:Commands
:End

nCr syntax is 
:valueA nCr valueB

List indexes start at 1 so that's why i set it to R+1

N= row
R= column

PROGRAM: PASCAL
:ClrHome
:ClrList L1
:Disp "ROW
:Input N
:For(R,0,N,1)
:N nCr R–>L1(R+1)
:End
:Disp L1

This is the fastest way I can think of to do this in programming (with a ti 84) but if you mean to be able to calculate the row using pen and paper then just draw out the triangle cause doing factorals are a pain!

1
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0

Here's an O(n) space-complexity solution in Python:

def generate_pascal_nth_row(n):
    result=[1]*n
    for i in range(n):
        previous_res = result.copy()
        for j in range(1,i):
            result[j] = previous_res[j-1] + previous_res[j]
    return result

print(generate_pascal_nth_row(6))
2
  • How is this O(n)? I count 2 for loops. If you are thinking that it is because your second loop doesn't go to n every time, I don't think that is correct. Observe: 1 + 2 + .. + n = n*(n + 1)/2 which is still n^2. – Joseph Wood Jan 12 '18 at 2:18
  • I mentioned O(n) "space". You're right time-complexity is O(n^2) – prafi Jan 12 '18 at 20:33
0

To find nth row -

int res[] = new int[n+1];
res[0] = 1;
for(int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
   for(int j = i; j > 0; j++)
      res[j] += res[j-1];
0
class Solution{
    public:
    
    int comb(int n,int r){
        long long c=1;
        for(int i=1;i<=r;i++) {   //calculates n!/(n-r)!
            c=((c*n))/i;  n--;
        }
        return c;
    }

    vector<int> getRow(int n) {  
        vector<int> v;
        for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            v.push_back(comb(n,i));
        return v;
    }
};

faster than 100% submissions on leet code https://leetcode.com/submissions/detail/406399031/

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