43

I'm trying to receive both a pattern & a string and return a map of group name -> matched result.

Example:

(?<user>.*)

I would like to return for a map containing "user" as a key and whatever it matches as its value.

the problem is that I can't seem to get the group name from the Java regex api. I can only get the matched values by name or by index. I don't have the list of group names and neither Pattern nor Matcher seem to expose this information. I have checked its source and it seems as if the information is there - it's just not exposed to the user.

I tried both Java's java.util.regex and jregex. (and don't really care if someone suggested any other library that is good, supported & high in terms performance that supports this feature).

2
  • Where does the pattern come from?
    – jlordo
    Mar 23, 2013 at 16:07
  • It comes from an loaded XML file, but I don't know in advance what it'll be.
    – Roy Reznik
    Mar 23, 2013 at 16:08

7 Answers 7

53

There is no API in Java to obtain the names of the named capturing groups. I think this is a missing feature.

The easy way out is to pick out candidate named capturing groups from the pattern, then try to access the named group from the match. In other words, you don't know the exact names of the named capturing groups, until you plug in a string that matches the whole pattern.

The Pattern to capture the names of the named capturing group is \(\?<([a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9]*)> (derived based on Pattern class documentation).

(The hard way is to implement a parser for regex and get the names of the capturing groups).

A sample implementation:

import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Set;
import java.util.TreeSet;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;
import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.MatchResult;

class RegexTester {

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

        String regex = scanner.nextLine();
        StringBuilder input = new StringBuilder();
        while (scanner.hasNextLine()) {
            input.append(scanner.nextLine()).append('\n');
        }

        Set<String> namedGroups = getNamedGroupCandidates(regex);

        Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regex);
        Matcher m = p.matcher(input);
        int groupCount = m.groupCount();

        int matchCount = 0;

        if (m.find()) {
            // Remove invalid groups
            Iterator<String> i = namedGroups.iterator();
            while (i.hasNext()) {
                try {
                    m.group(i.next());
                } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                    i.remove();
                }
            }

            matchCount += 1;
            System.out.println("Match " + matchCount + ":");
            System.out.println("=" + m.group() + "=");
            System.out.println();
            printMatches(m, namedGroups);

            while (m.find()) {
                matchCount += 1;
                System.out.println("Match " + matchCount + ":");
                System.out.println("=" + m.group() + "=");
                System.out.println();
                printMatches(m, namedGroups);
            }
        }
    }

    private static void printMatches(Matcher matcher, Set<String> namedGroups) {
        for (String name: namedGroups) {
            String matchedString = matcher.group(name);
            if (matchedString != null) {
                System.out.println(name + "=" + matchedString + "=");
            } else {
                System.out.println(name + "_");
            }
        }

        System.out.println();

        for (int i = 1; i < matcher.groupCount(); i++) {
            String matchedString = matcher.group(i);
            if (matchedString != null) {
                System.out.println(i + "=" + matchedString + "=");
            } else {
                System.out.println(i + "_");
            }
        }

        System.out.println();
    }

    private static Set<String> getNamedGroupCandidates(String regex) {
        Set<String> namedGroups = new TreeSet<String>();

        Matcher m = Pattern.compile("\\(\\?<([a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9]*)>").matcher(regex);

            while (m.find()) {
                namedGroups.add(m.group(1));
            }

            return namedGroups;
        }
    }
}

There is a caveat to this implementation, though. It currently doesn't work with regex in Pattern.COMMENTS mode.

11
  • 2
    +1, I would change + to * in your regex to also match groupnames with length 1.
    – jlordo
    Mar 23, 2013 at 16:17
  • 1
    @jlordo: The code was not tested thoroughly. I written it on a whim and never used it again. Thanks for the comments.
    – nhahtdh
    Mar 23, 2013 at 16:29
  • 1
    I wasn't criticizing you ;) I am the upvoter, because I saw the idea behind your code and liked it. All I did was post a comment on how to further improve it :)
    – jlordo
    Mar 23, 2013 at 16:49
  • 1
    @RoyReznik: obviously problematic As a serious advice, you are free to implement your own method of extraction with loop, it will be faster than picking the group out with regex.
    – nhahtdh
    Mar 24, 2013 at 5:17
  • 1
    @Lii: I'm not sure if you read the solution or not, but the solution consists of 2 phases: find named group candidates, then confirm the named groups when you found a match. The first phase will find at least as many named groups as there are in the regex string, and may include false positive (with caveat when Pattern.COMMENT mode is specified). The second phase checks which ones are actual named group.
    – nhahtdh
    May 23, 2016 at 2:15
23

This is the second easy approach to the problem: we will call the non-public method namedGroups() in Pattern class to obtain a Map<String, Integer> that maps group names to the group numbers via Java Reflection API. The advantage of this approach is that we don't need a string that contains a match to the regex to find the exact named groups.

Personally, I think it is not much of an advantage, since it is useless to know the named groups of a regex where a match to the regex does not exist among the input strings.

However, please take note of the drawbacks:

  • This approach may not apply if the code is run in a system with security restrictions to deny any attempts to gain access to non-public methods (no modifier, protected and private methods).
  • The code is only applicable to JRE from Oracle or OpenJDK.
  • The code may also break in future releases, since we are calling a non-public method.
  • There may also be performance hit from calling function via reflection. (In this case, the performance hit mainly comes from the reflection overhead, since there is not much going on in namedGroups() method). I do not know how the performance hit affects overall performance, so please do measurement on your system.

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;

class RegexTester {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

    String regex = scanner.nextLine();
    // String regex = "(?<group>[a-z]*)[trick(?<nothing>ha)]\\Q(?<quoted>Q+E+)\\E(.*)(?<Another6group>\\w+)";
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile(regex);

    Map<String, Integer> namedGroups = null;
    try {
      namedGroups = getNamedGroups(p);
    } catch (Exception e) {
      // Just an example here. You need to handle the Exception properly
      e.printStackTrace();
    }

    System.out.println(namedGroups);
  }


  @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
  private static Map<String, Integer> getNamedGroups(Pattern regex)
      throws NoSuchMethodException, SecurityException,
             IllegalAccessException, IllegalArgumentException,
             InvocationTargetException {

    Method namedGroupsMethod = Pattern.class.getDeclaredMethod("namedGroups");
    namedGroupsMethod.setAccessible(true);

    Map<String, Integer> namedGroups = null;
    namedGroups = (Map<String, Integer>) namedGroupsMethod.invoke(regex);

    if (namedGroups == null) {
      throw new InternalError();
    }

    return Collections.unmodifiableMap(namedGroups);
  }
}
6

You want to use the small name-regexp library. It is a thin wrapper around java.util.regex with named capture groups support for Java 5 or 6 users.

Sample usage:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(?<user>.*)");
Matcher m = p.matcher("JohnDoe");
System.out.println(m.namedGroups()); // {user=JohnDoe}

Maven:

<dependency>
  <groupId>com.github.tony19</groupId>
  <artifactId>named-regexp</artifactId>
  <version>0.2.3</version>
</dependency>

References:

5
  • 2
    You are saying that Java7+ offers this feature but I cannot find the method to get named groups in Java7. What should be used ? Apr 26, 2016 at 9:41
  • @OlivierM. See the two last references added with my update.
    – Stephan
    Apr 26, 2016 at 14:03
  • 2
    Matcher.group takes a group name as parameter. I don't see how this helps getting all the group names of a regex ;) Apr 27, 2016 at 8:01
  • I rolled back to previous version, since Java doesn't have support for getting the list of group names, which is the point of this question.
    – nhahtdh
    Jan 19, 2017 at 17:10
  • 2
    @nhahtdh I have updated the answer for removing invalid Java 7 references.
    – Stephan
    Jan 19, 2017 at 17:21
2

I used a pattern of groups of regex into the "real" pattern to get the names of the groups, like that:

        List<String> namedGroups = new ArrayList<String>();
    {
        String normalized = matcher.pattern().toString();
        Matcher mG = Pattern.compile("\\(\\?<(.+?)>.*?\\)").matcher(normalized);

        while (mG.find()) {
            for (int i = 1; i <= mG.groupCount(); i++) {
                namedGroups.add(mG.group(i));
            }
        }
    }

And then, I added the names with the values into a HashMap<String, String>:

        Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>(matcher.groupCount());
        
        namedGroups.stream().forEach(name -> {      
            if (matcher.start(name) > 0) {
                map.put(name, matcher.group(name));
            } else {
                map.put(name, "");
            }
        });
1
  • \(\?<(.+?)>.*?\) won't work for nested groups, e.g. (?<group1>(?<group2>foo)) — group2 won't be found. It looks like \(\?<(.+?)> should be enough, if we assume that the original regexp is valid itself.
    – Pavel Alay
    Aug 9, 2021 at 10:36
1

There is no way to do this with the standard API. You can use reflection to access these:

final Field namedGroups = pattern.getClass().getDeclaredField("namedGroups");
namedGroups.setAccessible(true);
final Map<String, Integer> nameToGroupIndex = (Map<String, Integer>) namedGroups.get(pattern);

Use the key set of the map if you don't care about indexes.

1

Versions of Java prior to version 20 had no way to achieve this through the standard API.

This was a long-recognized need, as evidenced by JDK Bug System issue JDK-7032377 "MatchResult and Pattern should provide a way to query names of named-capturing groups". This issue requested that the named capturing groups be exposed through the MatchResult and Pattern APIs. This issue was created in 2011, and the functionality was finally implemented in 2022 for Java 20.

0

As of Java 20, this can be achieved using the namedGroups method on MatchResult (which Matcher implements):

String name = "2023-06-05 johndoe123";
Pattern regex = Pattern.compile("(?<date>[0-9-]+) (?<user>\\w+)");
Matcher matcher = regex.matcher(name);
if (matcher.matches()) {
    MatchResult matchResult = matcher.toMatchResult();
    Map<String, String> groups = matcher.namedGroups().keySet().stream()
            .collect(Collectors.toUnmodifiableMap(
                    Function.identity(), matcher::group));

    System.out.println(groups); // {date=2023-06-05, user=johndoe123}
}

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