9

I want to be able to do this:

SELECT dept.id, (invoices.col1 + invoices.col2 + invoices.col3) as sumTotal 
FROM dept 
     INNER JOIN invoices ON invoices.id_dept = dept.id 
WHERE sumTotal > 10000

But I am getting an unknown column on using "sumTotal".

Is this possible?

0

4 Answers 4

19

Use HAVING:

SELECT dept.id, (invoices.col1 + invoices.col2 + invoices.col3) as sumTotal 
FROM dept 
INNER JOIN invoices
    ON invoices.id_dept = dept.id 
HAVING sumTotal > 10000

The problem is that the WHERE clause is executed before the SELECT statement. Therefore the sumTotal column is not yet available.

The HAVING clause is executed after the SELECT statement. It kinds of filter the results out after you have selected everything. Bear in mind, though, because of that using HAVING is slower. It operates on the whole set of rows.

From the MySQL documentation:

The HAVING clause is applied nearly last, just before items are sent to the client, with no optimization. (LIMIT is applied after HAVING.)

The SQL standard requires that HAVING must reference only columns in the GROUP BY clause or columns used in aggregate functions. However, MySQL supports an extension to this behavior, and permits HAVING to refer to columns in the SELECT list and columns in outer subqueries as well.


The HAVING clause can refer to aggregate functions, which the WHERE clause cannot:

SELECT user, MAX(salary)
FROM users
GROUP BY user
HAVING MAX(salary) > 10;

Do not use HAVING for items that should be in the WHERE clause.

3
  • A named calculated field doesn't seem to work (in MS-SQL) with either HAVING or WHERE sqlfiddle.com/#!6/92119/1 ... but adding the calculation again in a WHERE clause seems to work! ( sqlfiddle.com/#!6/92119/3 )
    – AjV Jsy
    Commented Mar 25, 2013 at 15:50
  • @MrFuzzyButton MySQL and MS-SQL work in a different way here. My answer and the question are entirely about MySQL as I pointed above. Commented Mar 25, 2013 at 15:54
  • 2
    Yes, but I thought it was worth noting, nonetheless :)
    – AjV Jsy
    Commented Mar 25, 2013 at 15:55
5

Or use WHERE...

SELECT dept.id, (invoices.col1 + invoices.col2 + invoices.col3) as sumTotal 
  FROM dept 
  JOIN invoices ON invoices.id_dept = dept.id 
 WHERE invoices.col1 + invoices.col2 + invoices.col3 > 10000
4

You can also try this:

WITH temp AS
(
 SELECT
   dept.id,
   (invoices.col1 + invoices.col2 + invoices.col3) as sumTotal 
 FROM dept INNER JOIN invoices ON invoices.id_dept = dept.id
)
SELECT *
FROM temp
WHERE sumTotal > 10000
1
  • 1
    Thanks for editing the statement. I'm new to stackoverflow and need to learn how to use all the tools.
    – enapi
    Commented Mar 25, 2013 at 16:00
1

You have to use 'having' -

SELECT dept.id, (invoices.col1 + invoices.col2 + invoices.col3) as sumTotal 
FROM dept 
INNER JOIN invoices ON invoices.id_dept = dept.id 
HAVING sumTotal > 10000

I'm not sure whether you can use your aliased field or whether you have to write 'having (invoices.col1 + invoices.col2 + invoices.col3) > 10000.

The 'where' statement works in conjunction with the 'select': it filters which records are initially returned. 'Having' then filters that returned dataset, normally because the 'having' condition could not be known at the time of the 'select'.

To quote one documentation, 'The HAVING clause was added to SQL because the WHERE keyword could not be used with aggregate functions.' Somewhere else is written 'The SQL HAVING clause is used in combination with the SQL GROUP BY clause. It can be used in an SQL SELECT statement to filter the records that a SQL GROUP BY returns.'

1
  • None of which applies here.
    – Strawberry
    Commented Mar 25, 2013 at 15:48

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