40

Anybody has an alternate way of finding and copying files in bash than:

find . -ctime -15 | awk '{print "cp " $1 " ../otherfolder/"}' | sh

I like this way because it's flexible, as I'm building my command (can by any command) and executing it after.

Are there other ways of streamlining commands to a list of files?

Thanks

92

I would recommend using find's -exec option:

find . -ctime 15 -exec cp {} ../otherfolder \;

As always, consult the manpage for best results.

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  • The find man page suggests using single quotes around the braces since it may get misinterpreted without them. – Jonathan Sternberg May 15 '10 at 5:59
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    You should replace \; with + to avoid running a cp every time. – Reinstate Monica Please Jul 13 '14 at 23:05
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    @BroSlow Not sure why but this only works with \; and with + I get 'missing argument for -exec'. – user234932 Jan 7 '16 at 15:57
  • what if all the files have the same name (im.png)? Can I put them in the same directory while renaming, such as im_1.png, im_2.png, im_3.png... – MrMartin Jan 15 '19 at 13:33
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    @user234932 you need to use an alternate way to pass destination to cp: find … -exec cp -t <target_directory> {} + should work – Mr. Tao Nov 21 '19 at 13:34
8

I usually use this one:

find . -ctime -15 -exec cp {} ../otherfolder/ \;
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8

You can do it with xargs:

$ find . -ctime 15 -print0 | xargs -0 -I{} cp {} ../otherfolder

See also grep utility in shell script.

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    This has the advantage of being faster than find -exec because it doesn't create a new cp process for each file. However if you have GNU find you can do find -exec ... + instead of find -exec ... ';' for the same effect :) – hobbs Oct 14 '09 at 7:18
8

If your cp is GNU's:

find . -ctime 15 -print0 | xargs --no-run-if-empty -0 cp --target-directory=../otherfolder
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  • With this syntax I get cp: missing operand. If I use the syntax provided by @andrey-vlasovskikh (-I{} -cp {} otherfolder) I don't receive this error. – harperville Feb 16 at 17:14
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    Updated the answer to cover that case (when find produces no output). – Idelic Mar 6 at 11:29
1

Use this for copy and many other things:

for f in $(find /apps -type f -name 'foo'); do cp ${f} ${f}.bak; cmd2; cmd3; done;
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    Shouldn't there be a $ before (find /apps -type f -name 'foo')? Thanks. – Shaohua Li Aug 26 '18 at 3:53
-1

-exec is likely the way to go, unless you have far too many files. Then use xargs.

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  • This could be a comment to an accepted response or supply examples for each method you've mentioned. – harperville Feb 16 at 17:16

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