64

I have the following plot:

library(reshape)
library(ggplot2)
library(gridExtra)
require(ggplot2)



data2<-structure(list(IR = structure(c(4L, 3L, 2L, 1L, 4L, 3L, 2L, 1L
), .Label = c("0.13-0.16", "0.17-0.23", "0.24-0.27", "0.28-1"
), class = "factor"), variable = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("Real queens", "Simulated individuals"
), class = "factor"), value = c(15L, 11L, 29L, 42L, 0L, 5L, 21L, 
22L), Legend = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("Real queens", 
"Simulated individuals"), class = "factor")), .Names = c("IR", 
"variable", "value", "Legend"), row.names = c(NA, -8L), class = "data.frame")
p <- ggplot(data2, aes(x =factor(IR), y = value, fill = Legend, width=.15))


data3<-structure(list(IR = structure(c(4L, 3L, 2L, 1L, 4L, 3L, 2L, 1L
), .Label = c("0.13-0.16", "0.17-0.23", "0.24-0.27", "0.28-1"
), class = "factor"), variable = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("Real queens", "Simulated individuals"
), class = "factor"), value = c(2L, 2L, 6L, 10L, 0L, 1L, 4L, 
4L), Legend = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("Real queens", 
"Simulated individuals"), class = "factor")), .Names = c("IR", 
"variable", "value", "Legend"), row.names = c(NA, -8L), class = "data.frame")
q<- ggplot(data3, aes(x =factor(IR), y = value, fill = Legend, width=.15))


##the plot##
q + geom_bar(position='dodge', colour='black') + ylab('Frequency') + xlab('IR')+scale_fill_grey() +theme(axis.text.x=element_text(colour="black"), axis.text.y=element_text(colour="Black"))+ opts(title='', panel.grid.major = theme_blank(),panel.grid.minor = theme_blank(),panel.border = theme_blank(),panel.background = theme_blank(), axis.ticks.x = theme_blank())

I want the y-axis to display only integers. Whether this is accomplished through rounding or through a more elegant method isn't really important to me.

  • 2
    Have you looked at any of the scale functions at all? scale_y_continuous maybe? – joran Mar 25 '13 at 18:26
  • I read some answers to similar questions and was under the impression that scale_y_continuous converted from other numerical formats (e.g., scientific notation), but didn't accommodate the real number to integer conversion I was looking for. I might be mistaken... – Atticus29 Mar 25 '13 at 18:36
31

With scale_y_continuous() and argument breaks= you can set the breaking points for y axis to integers you want to display.

ggplot(data2, aes(x =factor(IR), y = value, fill = Legend, width=.15)) +
    geom_bar(position='dodge', colour='black')+
    scale_y_continuous(breaks=c(1,3,7,10))
  • 10
    This solution is only good for situations where you know which values are on the axes. Not a good general solution. – swolf Jun 8 '18 at 10:15
  • @Atticus29 Please accept as corrects answer the one made by Sealander – Didzis Elferts Feb 28 at 11:12
58

If you have the scales package, you can use pretty_breaks() without having to manually specify the breaks.

q + geom_bar(position='dodge', colour='black') + 
scale_y_continuous(breaks= pretty_breaks())
  • 11
    This seemed to do nearly what the default method does and I still had decimal points in the breaks. – kory Nov 21 '17 at 16:05
  • 1
    worked great for me. – Nova Sep 5 '18 at 18:37
  • Where does pretty_breaks() come from? – Marian Dec 5 '18 at 7:57
  • 1
    pretty_breaks() are pretty, but not always integers. Obviously there is beauty in decimals... – PatrickT Feb 28 at 6:57
33

This is what I use:

ggplot(data3, aes(x = factor(IR), y = value, fill = Legend, width = .15)) +
  geom_col(position = 'dodge', colour = 'black') + 
  scale_y_continuous(breaks = function(x) unique(floor(pretty(seq(0, (max(x) + 1) * 1.1)))))
  • Thanks, this seems to produce the results as expected. – kory Nov 21 '17 at 16:08
  • 3
    It does! And it's a general solution - so this answer should be rated much higher! – swolf Jun 8 '18 at 10:18
10

You can use a custom labeller. For example, this function guarantees to only produce integer breaks:

int_breaks <- function(x, n = 5) pretty(x, n)[pretty(x, n) %% 1 == 0] 

Use as

+ scale_y_continuous(breaks = int_breaks)
  • This one causes you to lose the integer 1 if you have data only from 0 - 1.25 or what have you. I only see 0 on the x-axis. – kory Nov 21 '17 at 16:11
  • 1
    I like this for simplicity sake. Note that n could use some tweaking depending on your value range. it seems to determine how many breaks there will be (roughly). – Marian Dec 5 '18 at 8:00
1

These solutions did not work for me and did not explain the solutions.

The breaks argument to the scale_*_continuous functions can be used with a custom function that takes the limits as input and returns breaks as output. By default, the axis limits will be expanded by 5% on each side for continuous data (relative to the range of data). The axis limits will likely not be integer values due to this expansion.

The solution I was looking for was to simply round the lower limit up to the nearest integer, round the upper limit down to the nearest integer, and then have breaks at integer values between these endpoints. Therefore, I used the breaks function:

brk <- function(x) seq(ceiling(x[1]), floor(x[2]), by = 1)

The required code snippet is:

scale_y_continuous(breaks = function(x) seq(ceiling(x[1]), floor(x[2]), by = 1))

The reproducible example from original question is:

data3 <-
  structure(
    list(
      IR = structure(
        c(4L, 3L, 2L, 1L, 4L, 3L, 2L, 1L),
        .Label = c("0.13-0.16", "0.17-0.23", "0.24-0.27", "0.28-1"),
        class = "factor"
      ),
      variable = structure(
        c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L,
          2L, 2L, 2L, 2L),
        .Label = c("Real queens", "Simulated individuals"),
        class = "factor"
      ),
      value = c(2L, 2L, 6L, 10L, 0L, 1L, 4L,
                4L),
      Legend = structure(
        c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L),
        .Label = c("Real queens",
                   "Simulated individuals"),
        class = "factor"
      )
    ),
    row.names = c(NA,-8L),
    class = "data.frame"
  )

ggplot(data3, aes(
  x = factor(IR),
  y = value,
  fill = Legend,
  width = .15
)) +
  geom_col(position = 'dodge', colour = 'black') + ylab('Frequency') + xlab('IR') +
  scale_fill_grey() +
  scale_y_continuous(
    breaks = function(x) seq(ceiling(x[1]), floor(x[2]), by = 1),
    expand = expand_scale(mult = c(0, 0.05))
    ) +
  theme(axis.text.x=element_text(colour="black", angle = 45, hjust = 1), 
        axis.text.y=element_text(colour="Black"),
        panel.grid.major = element_blank(),
        panel.grid.minor = element_blank(),
        panel.border = element_blank(),
        panel.background = element_blank(), 
        axis.ticks.x = element_blank())
0

This answer builds on @Axeman's answer to address the comment by kory that if the data only goes from 0 to 1, no break is shown at 1. This seems to be because of inaccuracy in pretty with outputs which appear to be 1 not being identical to 1 (see example at the end).

Therefore if you use

int_breaks_rounded <- function(x, n = 5)  pretty(x, n)[round(pretty(x, n),1) %% 1 == 0]

with

+ scale_y_continuous(breaks = int_breaks_rounded)

both 0 and 1 are shown as breaks.

Example to illustrate difference from Axeman's

testdata <- data.frame(x = 1:5, y = c(0,1,0,1,1))

p1 <- ggplot(testdata, aes(x = x, y = y))+
  geom_point()


p1 + scale_y_continuous(breaks = int_breaks)
p1 + scale_y_continuous(breaks =  int_breaks_rounded)

Both will work with the data provided in the initial question.

Illustration of why rounding is required

pretty(c(0,1.05),5)
#> [1] 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2
identical(pretty(c(0,1.05),5)[6],1)
#> [1] FALSE

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