80

I have an anchor with both HREF and ONCLICK attributes set. If clicked and Javascript is enabled, I want it to only execute ONCLICK and ignore HREF. Likewise, if Javascript is disabled or unsupported, I want it to follow the HREF URL and ignore ONCLICK. Below is an example of what I'm doing, which would execute the JS and follow the link concurrently (usually the JS is executed and then the page changes):

<A HREF="http://example.com/no-js-login" ONCLICK="yes_js_login()">Log in</A>

what's the best way to do this?

I'm hoping for a Javascript answer, but I'll accept any method as long as it works, especially if this can be done with PHP. I've read "a href link executes and redirects page before javascript onclick function is able to finish" already, but it only delays HREF, but doesn't completely disable it. I'm also looking for something much simpler.

  • 4
    I would use to anchors one with an href and one without. On page load check if javascript is enabled, if it is show the correct anchor else show the other. – ewein Mar 25 '13 at 18:33
  • 1
    @ewein Why? That sounds like an awful lot of markup for a simple feature. – Supuhstar Sep 23 '15 at 13:53

10 Answers 10

42

You can use the first un-edited solution, if you put return first in the onclick attribute:

<a href="https://example.com/no-js-login" onclick="return yes_js_login();">Log in</a>

yes_js_login = function() {
     // Your code here
     return false;
}

Example: https://jsfiddle.net/FXkgV/289/

  • 1
    I like how clean this is! However, the accepted solution gives me more control as to whether the HREF is ignored – Supuhstar Mar 29 '14 at 2:11
  • Over the past couple years I've changed my mind; this is a better solution – Supuhstar Oct 12 '17 at 0:42
  • How wholesome ! – DrunkDevKek May 16 '18 at 8:11
  • But this is not working with JSX react. Will this work? – Coder Oct 10 at 9:41
56
    yes_js_login = function() {
         // Your code here
         return false;
    }

If you return false it should prevent the default action (going to the href).

Edit: Sorry that doesn't seem to work, you can do the following instead:

<a href="http://example.com/no-js-login" onclick="yes_js_login(); return false;">Link</a>
  • 8
    it doesn't work , jsfiddle.net/FXkgV/1 – Rachid Oussanaa Mar 25 '13 at 19:07
  • 1
    The edited answer does not answer the question, as it removes the actual link. – Itai Bar-Haim Jan 7 '14 at 13:34
  • 11
    alternatively use onclick="return yes_js_login();" with yes_js_login returning false – Uwe Kleine-König Jun 19 '14 at 8:26
  • 4
    None of the variants proposed here work in Chrome. – cgogolin Apr 30 '17 at 17:50
  • 1
    @cgogolin see my answer. – Gabe Rogan May 3 '17 at 16:15
31

Simply disable default browser behaviour using preventDefault and pass the event within your HTML.

<a href=/foo onclick= yes_js_login(event)>Lorem ipsum</a>

yes_js_login = function(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
}
  • 1
    return false did not work in polymer... above solution did work... Thanks – Paras Sachapara Mar 7 '18 at 17:38
14
<a href="http://www.google.com" class="ignore-click">Test</a>

with jQuery:

<script>
    $(".ignore-click").click(function(){
        return false;
    })
</script>

with JavaScript

<script>
        for (var i = 0; i < document.getElementsByClassName("ignore-click").length; i++) {
            document.getElementsByClassName("ignore-click")[i].addEventListener('click', function (event) {
                event.preventDefault();
                return false;
            });
        }
</script>

You assign class .ignore-click to as many elements you like and clicks on those elements will be ignored

  • This is a great solution! I used it for buttons that I have that when clicked a pseudo class .btn-loading is added to the clicked link, then if successful a checkmark(on error an X) replaces the loading animation. I don't want the button to be able to be clicked again in some instances(for both success and error), using this I can simply $(elemnent).addClass('disabled') and easily achieve the functionality I was looking in an elegant way! – Matthew Mathieson Feb 21 '18 at 5:05
13

You can use this simple code:

<a href="" onclick="return false;">add new action</a><br>
5

It's simpler if you pass an event parameter like this:

<a href="#" onclick="yes_js_login(event);">link</a>
function yes_js_login(e) {
    e.stopImmediatePropagation();
}
  • 1
    That doesn't work for me. I have to use e.preventDefault() – Milan Simek Dec 6 '15 at 20:02
1

I solved a situation where I needed a template for the element that would handle alternatively a regular URL or a javascript call, where the js function needs a reference to the calling element. In javascript, "this" works as a self reference only in the context of a form element, e.g., a button. I didn't want a button, just the apperance of a regular link.

Examples:

<a onclick="http://blahblah" href="http://blahblah" target="_blank">A regular link</a>
<a onclick="javascript:myFunc($(this));return false" href="javascript:myFunc($(this));"  target="_blank">javascript with self reference</a>

The href and onClick attributes have the same values, exept I append "return false" on onClick when it's a javascript call. Having "return false" in the called function did not work.

  • why are there two? Why are you putting JS in the HREF? – Supuhstar Aug 19 '14 at 18:43
  • Supuhstar, The actual code is dynamic, javascript, and will generate an <a> element for several hundred items that are defined externally. Each item will either specify a static link address, and thats where the generated <a> element should use the regular "href behaviour". Or, a javascript function call is specified for the item, in which case the <a> element's behaviour is calculated, based on the element's context. And in the code for the <a> generator, I just wanted to copy whatever is specified for each element, no testing whether it's a link address or a javascript funtion call. – Bo Johanson Oct 8 '14 at 11:49
  • I don't understand how this answers my question. Who said I wanted several hundred links? I really don't understand the point of all this, or even half of what you just said. – Supuhstar Oct 8 '14 at 13:23
1

This might help. No JQuery needed

<a href="../some-relative-link/file" 
onclick="this.href = 'https://docs.google.com/viewer?url='+this.href; this.onclick = '';" 
target="_blank">

This code does the following: Pass the relative link to Google Docs Viewer

  1. Get the full link version of the anchor by this.href
  2. open the link the the new window.

So in your case this might work:

<a href="../some-relative-link/file" 
onclick="this.href = 'javascript:'+console.log('something has stopped the link'); " 
target="_blank">
0

This worked for me:

<a href="" onclick="return false;">Action</a>
  • Thank you for your answer and welcome to Stack Exchange! Unfortunately, this doesn't seem to add any new knowledge, since it seems previous answers already suggest this. If you agree, then it's better to upvote those. If you disagree, please edit your answer so your new knowledge comes to light! – Supuhstar Aug 8 '17 at 16:16
0

In my case, I had a condition when the user click the "a" element. The condition was:

If other section had more than ten items, then the user should be not redirected to other page.

If other section had less than ten items, then the user should be redirected to other page.

The functionality of the "a" elements depends of the other component. The code within click event is the follow:

var elementsOtherSection = document.querySelectorAll("#vehicle-item").length;
if (elementsOtherSection> 10){
     return true;
}else{
     event.preventDefault();
     return false;
}

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