188

I read many threads about getting only the first row of a left join, but, for some reason, this does not work for me.

Here is my structure (simplified of course)

Feeds

id |  title | content
----------------------
1  | Feed 1 | ...

Artists

artist_id | artist_name
-----------------------
1         | Artist 1
2         | Artist 2

feeds_artists

rel_id | artist_id | feed_id
----------------------------
1      |     1     |    1 
2      |     2     |    1 
...

Now i want to get the articles and join only the first Artist and I thought of something like this:

SELECT *
    FROM feeds 
    LEFT JOIN feeds_artists ON wp_feeds.id = (
        SELECT feeds_artists.feed_id FROM feeds_artists
        WHERE feeds_artists.feed_id = feeds.id 
    LIMIT 1
    )
WHERE feeds.id = '13815'

just to get only the first row of the feeds_artists, but already this does not work.

I can not use TOP because of my database and I can't group the results by feeds_artists.artist_id as i need to sort them by date (I got results by grouping them this way, but the results where not the newest)

Tried something with OUTER APPLY as well - no success as well. To be honest i can not really imagine whats going on in those rows - probably the biggest reason why i cant get this to work.

SOLUTION:

SELECT *
FROM feeds f
LEFT JOIN artists a ON a.artist_id = (
    SELECT artist_id
    FROM feeds_artists fa 
    WHERE fa.feed_id = f.id
    LIMIT 1
)
WHERE f.id = '13815'
3

9 Answers 9

127

If you can assume that artist IDs increment over time, then the MIN(artist_id) will be the earliest.

So try something like this (untested...)

SELECT *
  FROM feeds f
  LEFT JOIN artists a ON a.artist_id = (
    SELECT
      MIN(fa.artist_id) a_id
    FROM feeds_artists fa 
    WHERE fa.feed_id = f.feed_id
  ) a
9
  • 1
    Thanks for your fast response. This was not the exact answer, but totally got me on the right way. I always tried to join both on the same level instead of making the one depended from the other. Thank you very much for leading me on the right track. Edited the first post
    – KddC
    Mar 25, 2013 at 23:39
  • 5
    Wouldn't at this point a simple sub-query be better? Cause now you have a join, and a sub-query. Just asking cause I am looking for solution to same problem :)
    – galdikas
    Feb 11, 2016 at 10:36
  • 4
    subquery is too slow.
    – Sinux
    Apr 18, 2017 at 3:07
  • 2
    @Sinux define "too slow". It depends on number of records and on given requirements.
    – observer
    Mar 6, 2018 at 0:06
  • 2
    This won't work ! Sub-query does NOT allow passing on field from parent query !!!
    – Thư Sinh
    Mar 10, 2020 at 7:48
59

Version without subselect:

   SELECT f.title,
          f.content,
          MIN(a.artist_name) artist_name
     FROM feeds f
LEFT JOIN feeds_artists fa ON fa.feed_id = f.id
LEFT JOIN artists a ON fa.artist_id = a.artist_id
 GROUP BY f.id
8
  • 2
    i don't think this will be the first row(first id or first of something else), it's just randomly choose one among the left join rows.
    – Sinux
    Jun 21, 2016 at 3:04
  • 34
    This query is wrong. It will select "lowest" artist name not name of first artists in set.
    – Glapa
    Aug 12, 2016 at 16:54
  • 7
    Wrong for the question…but exactly what I want. In my case, I just want the first ID from the table I'm joining in. Feb 8, 2017 at 20:42
  • 2
    The problem here is that if you decide to do a COUNT or SUM you will have screwed up data. The problem with Subselect is that it's heavier for getting the data as it created a temporary table... I wish MySql could have a LIMIT on the LEFT JOIN level.
    – Shadoweb
    Feb 20, 2017 at 11:25
  • 1
    This solution has performance issue. Use Min/Max solution instead.
    – Sadegh PM
    Sep 2, 2018 at 11:33
54

@Matt Dodges answer put me on the right track. Thanks again for all the answers, which helped a lot of guys in the mean time. Got it working like this:

SELECT *
FROM feeds f
LEFT JOIN artists a ON a.artist_id = (
    SELECT artist_id
    FROM feeds_artists fa 
    WHERE fa.feed_id = f.id
    LIMIT 1
)
WHERE f.id = '13815'
4
  • 5
    This is answer working only for first row. Breaks when there is no f.id condition.
    – Jsowa
    Jun 8, 2020 at 0:34
  • @Jsowa I don't understand what you mean. Jul 31, 2022 at 18:53
  • @Jsowa The first row is what the original question asked for.
    – strager
    Oct 10, 2022 at 20:24
  • 1
    @strager, this question pop ups when you want to do it for many records, not only one. I refer to the generic solution that it doesn't cover it. Unfortunately that's how SO works.
    – Jsowa
    Oct 10, 2022 at 21:22
17

based on several answers here, i found something that worked for me and i wanted to generalize and explain what's going on.

convert:

LEFT JOIN table2 t2 ON (t2.thing = t1.thing)

to:

LEFT JOIN table2 t2 ON (t2.p_key = (SELECT MIN(t2_.p_key) 
    FROM table2 t2_ WHERE (t2_.thing = t1.thing) LIMIT 1))

the condition that connects t1 and t2 is moved from the ON and into the inner query WHERE. the MIN(primary key) or LIMIT 1 makes sure that only 1 row is returned by the inner query.

after selecting one specific row we need to tell the ON which row it is. that's why the ON is comparing the primary key of the joined tabled.

you can play with the inner query (i.e. order+limit) but it must return one primary key of the desired row that will tell the ON the exact row to join.

Update - for MySQL 5.7+

another option relevant to MySQL 5.7+ is to use ANY_VALUE+GROUP BY. it will select an artist name that is not necessarily the first one.

SELECT feeds.*,ANY_VALUE(feeds_artists.name) artist_name
    FROM feeds 
    LEFT JOIN feeds_artists ON feeds.id = feeds_artists.feed_id 
GROUP BY feeds.id

more info about ANY_VALUE: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/group-by-handling.html

2
  • notes: it will also work with only LIMIT or only MIN. the ON condition must be on the joined table primary key to avoid performance impact.
    – oriadam
    May 13, 2020 at 13:34
  • Yes, this solution for MySQL up to 5.6 is what I'm seeking for 10 years and haven't been fearless enough to get it. Great, thank you!
    – Milda
    Jun 22, 2022 at 17:47
2

I've used something else (I think better...) and want to share it:

I created a VIEW that has a "group" clause

CREATE VIEW vCountries AS SELECT * PROVINCES GROUP BY country_code

SELECT * FROM client INNER JOIN vCountries on client_province = province_id

I want to say yet, that I think that we need to do this solution BECAUSE WE DID SOMETHING WRONG IN THE ANALYSIS... at least in my case... but sometimes it's cheaper to do this that to redesign everything...

I hope it helps!

4
  • Assuming there are multiple rows (provinces?) for each country_code, that GROUP BY is improper. See ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY.
    – Rick James
    Jul 17, 2019 at 14:53
  • 1
    You don't have to create a view to be used solely for the LEFT/INNER JOIN?! Can use a subquery or a WITH x AS ( clause?
    – kiradotee
    Jan 20, 2020 at 14:23
  • For performance reasons please avoid SELECT *. Instead, select the exact fields that you need and nothing more. It will allow the optimizer to work better and you will most probably see a performance boost. You can see the difference with EXPLAIN.
    – oriadam
    Jun 30, 2022 at 6:24
  • @oriadam I agree, but here it was just for the example, it didnt make sense to write the fields... Jul 1, 2022 at 15:04
2

Here is my answer using the group by clause.

SELECT *
FROM feeds f
LEFT JOIN 
(
    SELECT artist_id, feed_id
    FROM feeds_artists
    GROUP BY artist_id, feed_id 
) fa ON fa.feed_id = f.id
LEFT JOIN artists a ON a.artist_id = fa.artist_id
1

I want to give a more generalized answer. One that will handle any case when you want to select only the first item in a LEFT JOIN.

You can use a subquery that GROUP_CONCATS what you want (sorted, too!), then just split the GROUP_CONCAT'd result and take only its first item, like so...

LEFT JOIN Person ON Person.id = (
    SELECT SUBSTRING_INDEX(
        GROUP_CONCAT(FirstName ORDER BY FirstName DESC SEPARATOR "_" ), '_', 1)
    ) FROM Person
);

Since we have DESC as our ORDER BY option, this will return a Person id for someone like "Zack". If we wanted someone with the name like "Andy", we would change ORDER BY FirstName DESC to ORDER BY FirstName ASC.

This is nimble, as this places the power of ordering totally within your hands. But, after much testing, it will not scale well in a situation with lots of users and lots of data.

It is, however, useful in running data-intensive reports for admin.

2
  • 3
    The GROUP_CONCAT trick is good as long as the number of values is limited. The default limit is 1024 characters.
    – Rick James
    Jul 17, 2019 at 14:54
  • 1
    Nice hack, but the performance would be lousy in many cases. it takes ALL possible values, concatenate them, then split the first one. also it will break of the name has "_" in it so I recommend using some unprintable char as separator.
    – oriadam
    Feb 25, 2021 at 9:03
0

For some database like DB2 and PostgreSQL, you have to use the key word LATERAL for specifying a sub query in the LEFT JOIN : (here, it's for DB2)

SELECT f.*, a.*
FROM feeds f
LEFT JOIN LATERAL  
(
    SELECT artist_id, feed_id
    FROM feeds_artists sfa
    WHERE sfa.feed_id = f.id
    fetch first 1 rows only
) fa ON fa.feed_id = f.id
LEFT JOIN artists a ON a.artist_id = fa.artist_id
0

I know this is not a direct solution but as I've faced this and it's always a huge problem for me, and also using left join select etc. sometimes lead to a heavy process cost in database and server, I prefer doing this kind of left joins using array in php like this:

First get the data in range from second table and while you need just one row from second table, just save them with left join in-common column as key in result array.

SQL1:

$sql = SELECT artist_id FROM feeds_artists fa WHERE fa.feed_id {...RANGE...}
    $res = $mysqli->query($sql);
if ($res->num_rows > 0) {
    while ($row = $res->fetch_assoc()) {
        $join_data[...$KEY...] = $row['artist_id'];
}

Then, get the base data and add detail of left join table from previous array while fetch them like this:

SQL2:

$sql = SELECT * FROM feeds f WHERE f.id {...RANGE...};
$res = $mysqli->query($sql);
if ($res->num_rows > 0) {
    while ($row = $res->fetch_assoc()) {
        $key = $row[in_common_col_value];
        $row['EXTRA_DATA'] = $join_data[$key];
        $final_data[] = $row;
}

Now, you'll have a $final_data array with desire extra data from $join_data array. this usually works good for date range data and like this.

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