2

I've got 3 variables:

$left_side = "'Username'";
$equation = "==";
$right_side = "'Username'";

I want to test these variables as it was an if statement like so:

if($left_side $equation $right_side) {
    // do something
} else {
    // do something else
}

I know this works:

if(eval("return ".$left_side." ".$equation." ".$right_side.";")) {
    // do something
} else {
    // do something else
}

I always tought it's 'not good' to use eval. Especially when you try to run user input.

Is there an other way to do this? I tried to google it, but it's not my friend to day ;)

  • Use a switch case on the $equation? – Jared Farrish Mar 26 '13 at 8:02
  • I was hoping to avoid setting up a switch.. Probably the best way to go.. – Ferry Kobus Mar 26 '13 at 9:32
3
0

You may do something like this:

function testValues($val1, $equation, $val2) {
   $res = false;
   switch($equation) {
      case "==":
          $res = $val1 == $val2;
          break;
      case ">":
          $res = $val1 > $val2;
          break;
      //....
      default:
         throw new Exception("Unknown operator");
   }
   return $res;
}

and than use it like:

 if(testValues($left_side,$equation,$right_side)) {
     //do something
 } else {
    //do something
 }
| improve this answer | |
2
0

eval is evil. And no, there's no other (easy) solution, but maybe this one helps:

if ($equation == "==") {
    if ($left_side == $right_side) {
        // ... your code goes here.
    } else {
        // Do some other stuff.
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Or maybe a switch( $equation )? – hjpotter92 Mar 26 '13 at 8:03
  • Yes, switch() could be another possibility. But if statements are a bit faster ;) – sebastian Mar 26 '13 at 8:05
  • @sebastian maybe, but not so much that if you are checking all available operators that it becomes worth the extra code of writing so many nested if statements. – Jon Mar 26 '13 at 8:09
2
0

You could use switch:

$left_side = "'Username'";
$equation = "doublequal";
$right_side = "'Username'";

switch($equation){
    case 'doublequal':
        if ($left_side == $right_side) {
             // code
        }
    break;
    //......
}

You should never use eval() especially with user input.

| improve this answer | |
  • While I agree with the method, I don't agree with changing $equation to a string (ie doubleequal) and evaluating it in that manner. Keep it simple, and keep the operators that are expected within actual code for readability. – Jon Mar 26 '13 at 8:15
  • Thinking that the $equation may come from a form, I think is better to change it to string. Don't you think so? – Mihai Iorga Mar 26 '13 at 8:16
  • Not particularly, especially since you'll have to remember all the strings you come up with to represent the operator functionality, and then if anyone else goes through the code they'll have to interpret how you came up with all the string replacements, etc. If you keep it to the string of operators, ie ==, >=, etc, anyone else ever looking at the code will be able to look at the switch statement and know from a higher level how it is functioning rather than having to look down into each if statement, etc. I just think that in the long run, it helps with the readability. – Jon Mar 26 '13 at 8:21
  • I don't know why, but I prefer my input over user input. – Mihai Iorga Mar 26 '13 at 8:22
  • Well, even with a form, a user can send whatever they want to if it's not in a select box or something similar (and even if so, they can always modify it). But there is always the default: switch in case the operator you're checking for isn't available and then you can error out. Meh, it is a difference in style only I suppose. =] – Jon Mar 26 '13 at 8:29
0
0

eval() is evil, but call_user_func() is evil too and every framework uses this function in one place or another.

Tools aren't evil. They are just tools. Evil is the way that we use them.

As Uncle Ben said: Great power involves great responsibility :)

| improve this answer | |
  • I am curious, how do you suppose call_user_func() is evil? If it's because it can take user input, and the method doesn't exist, it will throw an error. eval, on the other hand, with user input can do some serious damage. – Jon Mar 28 '13 at 5:59
  • the problem isn't to call non existent funcitons. The real problem is that you can let the user to call internal functions (functions that don't want to be exposed). If you propertly filter the user input and all is perfect, no problem, but: what happens if you are using a big framework and you don't knwnow every line of code? The most security issues in frameworks are due to this problem (rails comunity knows about it). IMHO is something similar than eval and you can do serious damage too.. – gonzalo123 Jun 3 '13 at 15:04
  • If you don't want a class function to be called using 'call_user_func()', then you should declare the method as private or protected. – Jon Jun 3 '13 at 17:23
-2
0

I find this trick

http://gonzalo123.com/2012/03/12/how-to-use-eval-without-using-eval-in-php/

the idea is create a temporary file with the PHP source code, include this file with the standard PHP’s include functions and destroy the temporary file.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That's just "longhand eval". "Eval is evil" is about the core idea of executing arbitrary variable code, not about the eval function as such. – deceze Mar 26 '13 at 8:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.