10

So in this (simplified) bit of code, when someone hits my node server I make a GET request to another website and print the HTML page title to the console. Works fine:

var http = require("http");
var cheerio = require('cheerio');

var port = 8081;
s = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
var opts = {
    method: 'GET',
    port: 80,
    hostname: "pwoing.com",
    path: "/"
};
http.request(opts, function(response) {
    console.log("Content-length: ", response.headers['content-length']);
    var str = '';
    response.on('data', function (chunk) {
        str += chunk;
    });
    response.on('end', function() {
        dom = cheerio.load(str);
        var title = dom('title');
        console.log("PAGE TITLE: ",title.html());
    });
}).end();
res.end("Done.");
}).listen(port, '127.0.0.1');

However, in the actual app, users can specify a URL to hit. That means my node server could be downloading 20GB movie files or whatever. Not good. The content-length header is no use for stopping this either as it isn't transmitted by all servers. The question then:

How can I tell it to stop the GET request after, say, the first 10KB are received?

Cheers!

3
  • How about checking the content-type/mime-type?
    – Amberlamps
    Commented Mar 26, 2013 at 11:46
  • Could do I suppose, but like content-length, it's not a reliable indicator - the server I'm making a request to could still send any length of data technically. ...as I understand it anyway! Surely there must be a way of just "hanging up" after the first 10K of body. Commented Mar 26, 2013 at 11:52
  • Another approach that you might want to consider is to use streams and pipe them back to the client as they come so that you don't buffer the entire response. docs.nodejitsu.com/articles/advanced/streams/… Commented Mar 26, 2013 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

17

You could abort the request once you have read enough data:

  http.request(opts, function(response) {
    var request = this;
    console.log("Content-length: ", response.headers['content-length']);
    var str = '';
    response.on('data', function (chunk) {
      str += chunk;
      if (str.length > 10000)
      {
        request.abort();
      }
    });
    response.on('end', function() {
      console.log('done', str.length);
      ...
    });
  }).end();

This will abort the request at around 10.000 bytes, since the data arrives in chunks of various sizes.

3
  • Aha! That's what I needed. Much appreciated :) Commented Mar 26, 2013 at 13:26
  • Can you please clear me one thing? I have checked by adding a console.log('something) just before "str += chunk", it's logging only once, but I am sure that I am receiving multiple chunk of data so in that case it should log multiple times...
    – Devasish
    Commented Apr 26, 2017 at 11:25
  • @Devasish yes, you would expect so, unless you're using the same code as my answer and the request gets aborted?
    – robertklep
    Commented Apr 26, 2017 at 11:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.