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I am trying to compare means of the two groups 'single mothers with one child' and 'single mothers with more than one child' before and after the reform of the EITC system in 1993.

Through the procedure T-test in SPSS, I can get the difference between groups before and after the reform. But how do I get the difference of the difference (I still want standard errors)?

I found these methods for STATA and R (http://thetarzan.wordpress.com/2011/06/20/differences-in-differences-estimation-in-r-and-stata/), but I can't seem to figure it out in SPSS.

Hope someone will be able to help.

All the best, Anne

  • 1
    I'm confused how your confused! You just take the t-test of the differences. Or, as the author on the blog post notes, you fit a regression model with the post-mean as the outcome, and the pre-mean, the treatment dummy, and the pre-mean*treatment dummy interaction on the right hand side. – Andy W Mar 26 '13 at 19:17
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This can be done with the GENLIN procedure. Here's some random data I generated to show how:

data list list /after oneChild value.
begin data.
0   1   12
0   1   12
0   1   11
0   1   13
0   1   11
1   1   10
1   1   9
1   1   8
1   1   9
1   1   7
0   0   16
0   0   16
0   0   18
0   0   15
0   0   17
1   0   6
1   0   6
1   0   5
1   0   5
1   0   4
end data.
dataset name exampleData WINDOW=front.
EXECUTE.

value labels after 0 'before' 1 'after'.
value labels oneChild 0 '>1 child' 1 '1 child'.

The mean for the groups (in order, before I truncated to integers) are 17, 6, 12, and 9 respectively. So our GENLIN procedure should generate values of -11 (the after-before difference in the >1 child group), -5 (the difference of 1 child - >1 child), and 8 (the child difference of the after-before differences).

To graph the data, just so you can see what we're expecting:

* Chart Builder.
GGRAPH
  /GRAPHDATASET NAME="graphdataset" VARIABLES=after value oneChild MISSING=LISTWISE REPORTMISSING=NO    
  /GRAPHSPEC SOURCE=INLINE.
BEGIN GPL
  SOURCE: s=userSource(id("graphdataset"))
  DATA: after=col(source(s), name("after"), unit.category())
  DATA: value=col(source(s), name("value"))
  DATA: oneChild=col(source(s), name("oneChild"), unit.category())
  GUIDE: axis(dim(2), label("value"))
  GUIDE: legend(aesthetic(aesthetic.color.interior), label(""))
  SCALE: linear(dim(2), include(0))
  ELEMENT: line(position(smooth.linear(after*value)), color.interior(oneChild))
  ELEMENT: point.dodge.symmetric(position(after*value), color.interior(oneChild))
END GPL.

Now, for the GENLIN:

* Generalized Linear Models.
GENLIN value BY after oneChild (ORDER=DESCENDING)
  /MODEL after oneChild after*oneChild INTERCEPT=YES
 DISTRIBUTION=NORMAL LINK=IDENTITY
  /CRITERIA SCALE=MLE COVB=MODEL PCONVERGE=1E-006(ABSOLUTE) SINGULAR=1E-012 ANALYSISTYPE=3(WALD) 
    CILEVEL=95 CITYPE=WALD LIKELIHOOD=FULL
  /MISSING CLASSMISSING=EXCLUDE
  /PRINT CPS DESCRIPTIVES MODELINFO FIT SUMMARY SOLUTION.

The results table shows just what we expect.

  • The >1 child group is 12.3 - 10.1 lower after vs. before. This 95% CI contains the "real" value of 11

  • The before difference between >1 children and 1 child is 5.7 - 3.5, containing the real value of 5

  • The difference-of-differences is 9.6 - 6.4, containing the real value of (17-6) - (12-9) = 8

Std. errors, p values, and the other hypothesis testing values are all reported as well. Hope that helps.

EDIT: this can be done with less "complicated" syntax by computing the interaction term yourself and doing simple linear regression:

compute interaction = after*onechild.
execute.

REGRESSION
  /MISSING LISTWISE
  /STATISTICS COEFF OUTS CI(95) R ANOVA
  /CRITERIA=PIN(.05) POUT(.10)
  /NOORIGIN 
  /DEPENDENT value
  /METHOD=ENTER after oneChild interaction.

Note that the resulting standard errors and confidence intervals are actually different from the previous method. I don't know enough about SPSS's GENLIN and REGRESSION procedures to tell you why that's the case. In this contrived example, the conclusion you'd draw from your data would be approximately the same. In real life, the data aren't likely to be this clean, so I don't know which method is "better".

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General Linear model, i take it as a 'ANOVA' model.

So use the related module in SPSS's Analyze menu.

After T-test, you need to check the sigma equality of each group .

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Regarding the first answer above:

* Note that GENLIN uses maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) whereas REGRESSION
* uses ordinary least squares (OLS).  Therefore, GENLIN reports z- and Chi-square tests
* where REGRESSION reports t- and F-tests.  Rather than using GENLIN, use UNIANOVA
* to get the same results as REGRESSION, but without the need to compute your own
* product term.

UNIANOVA value BY after oneChild
  /PLOT=PROFILE(after*oneChild) 
  /PLOT=PROFILE(oneChild*after) 
  /PRINT PARAMETER
  /EMMEANS=TABLES(after*oneChild) COMPARE(after)
  /EMMEANS=TABLES(after*oneChild) COMPARE(oneChild)
  /DESIGN=after oneChild after*oneChild.

HTH.

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