38

I have a HUGE collection and I am looking for a property by key someplace inside the collection. What is a reliable way to get a list of references or full paths to all objects containing that key/index? I use jQuery and lodash if it helps and you can forget about infinite pointer recursion, this is a pure JSON response.

fn({ 'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': {'d':{'e':7}}}, "d"); 
// [o.c]

fn({ 'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': {'d':{'e':7}}}, "e");
// [o.c.d]

fn({ 'aa': 1, 'bb': 2, 'cc': {'d':{'x':9}}, dd:{'d':{'y':9}}}, 'd');
// [o.cc,o.cc.dd]

fwiw lodash has a _.find function that will find nested objects that are two nests deep, but it seems to fail after that. (e.g. http://codepen.io/anon/pen/bnqyh)

46

This should do it:

function fn(obj, key) {
    if (_.has(obj, key)) // or just (key in obj)
        return [obj];
    // elegant:
    return _.flatten(_.map(obj, function(v) {
        return typeof v == "object" ? fn(v, key) : [];
    }), true);

    // or efficient:
    var res = [];
    _.forEach(obj, function(v) {
        if (typeof v == "object" && (v = fn(v, key)).length)
            res.push.apply(res, v);
    });
    return res;
}
  • 3
    this almost worked for me. I had to change line #3 to be return [obj[key]]; instead so that I would get an array of the key's values back instead of the wrapping object – Chris Montgomery Jul 31 '14 at 15:40
  • 2
    @ChrisMontgomery: Yeah, but OP wanted "all objects containing that key" (probably he's doing a pluck() on the result anyway) – Bergi Jul 31 '14 at 16:42
  • 1
    @Bergi makes sense. Your solution works for all my scenarios while the answer from Al Jey had problems with objects inside arrays inside objects. – Chris Montgomery Jul 31 '14 at 17:11
  • 1
    What is the difference here between res.push(v) and res.push.apply(res, v); ? – Michael Trouw May 31 '16 at 14:23
  • 1
    @MichaelTrouw: Actually v is always an array if the if condition is met, because fn always returns an array. We use push.apply here to append multiple items at once to the res array - like res = res.concat(v) would, but without creating a new array. – Bergi May 31 '16 at 17:06
23

a pure JavaScript solution would look like the following:

function findNested(obj, key, memo) {
  var i,
      proto = Object.prototype,
      ts = proto.toString,
      hasOwn = proto.hasOwnProperty.bind(obj);

  if ('[object Array]' !== ts.call(memo)) memo = [];

  for (i in obj) {
    if (hasOwn(i)) {
      if (i === key) {
        memo.push(obj[i]);
      } else if ('[object Array]' === ts.call(obj[i]) || '[object Object]' === ts.call(obj[i])) {
        findNested(obj[i], key, memo);
      }
    }
  }

  return memo;
}

here's how you'd use this function:

findNested({'aa': 1, 'bb': 2, 'cc': {'d':{'x':9}}, dd:{'d':{'y':9}}}, 'd');

and the result would be:

[{x: 9}, {y: 9}]
  • This solution does not work with nested arrays, e.g. findNested({ 'a': [ {'b': {'c': 7}} ]}, 'b') while @Bergi's does – Chris Montgomery Jul 31 '14 at 17:50
  • 2
    @ChrisMontgomery, that's because the original question only included objects and didn't have any arrays, I've updated the sample. – Eugene Kuzmenko Aug 7 '14 at 19:17
  • @AlJey, for your lodash example I used var o = {a: {really: 'long'}, obj: {that: {keeps: 'going'}}} and then findNested(o, 'that') which gives me RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded. First one works splended though! – Jon49 Feb 16 '15 at 20:45
  • Uncaught RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded – momomo Aug 16 '17 at 21:59
  • I was using it on window – momomo Aug 16 '17 at 21:59
5

this will deep search an array of objects (hay) for a value (needle) then return an array with the results...

search = function(hay, needle, accumulator) {
  var accumulator = accumulator || [];
  if (typeof hay == 'object') {
    for (var i in hay) {
      search(hay[i], needle, accumulator) == true ? accumulator.push(hay) : 1;
    }
  }
  return new RegExp(needle).test(hay) || accumulator;
}
  • It worked nice for me – robert Aug 26 '15 at 15:00
  • @ryanyuyu - it is readable, not close to minified. it's plain english, but does require quite of bit of IQ points to understand. This is a beautiful yet complex solution which stresses the brain to the limits :) – vsync Sep 29 '16 at 15:04
  • 1
    @vsync the code has since been edited. See the original revision – ryanyuyu Sep 29 '16 at 15:22
2

Something like this would work, converting it to an object and recursing down.

function find(jsonStr, searchkey) {
    var jsObj = JSON.parse(jsonStr);
    var set = [];
    function fn(obj, key, path) {
        for (var prop in obj) {
            if (prop === key) {
                set.push(path + "." + prop);
            }
            if (obj[prop]) {
                fn(obj[prop], key, path + "." + prop);
            }
        }
        return set;
    }
    fn(jsObj, searchkey, "o");
}

Fiddle: jsfiddle

2

If you can write a recursive function in plain JS (or with combination of lodash) that will be the best one (by performance), but if you want skip recursion from your side and want to go for a simple readable code (which may not be best as per performance) then you can use lodash#cloneDeepWith for any purposes where you have to traverse a object recursively.

let findValuesDeepByKey = (obj, key, res = []) => (
    _.cloneDeepWith(obj, (v,k) => {k==key && res.push(v)}) && res
)

So, the callback you passes as the 2nd argument of _.cloneDeepWith will recursively traverse all the key/value pairs recursively and all you have to do is the operation you want to do with each. the above code is just a example of your case. Here is a working example:

var object = {
    prop1: 'ABC1',
    prop2: 'ABC2',
    prop3: {
        prop4: 'ABC3',
        prop5Arr: [{
                prop5: 'XYZ'
            },
            {
                prop5: 'ABC4'
            },
            {
                prop6: {
                    prop6NestedArr: [{
                            prop1: 'XYZ Nested Arr'
                        },
                        {
                            propFurtherNested: {key100: '100 Value'}
                        }
                    ]
                }
            }
        ]
    }
}
let findValuesDeepByKey = (obj, key, res = []) => (
    _.cloneDeepWith(obj, (v,k) => {k==key && res.push(v)}) && res
)

console.log(findValuesDeepByKey(object, 'prop1'));
console.log(findValuesDeepByKey(object, 'prop5'));
console.log(findValuesDeepByKey(object, 'key100'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.10/lodash.min.js"></script>

2

With Deepdash you can pickDeep and then get paths from it, or indexate (build path->value object)

var obj = { 'aa': 1, 'bb': 2, 'cc': {'d':{'x':9}}, dd:{'d':{'y':9}}}

var cherry = _.pickDeep(obj,"d");

console.log(JSON.stringify(cherry));
// {"cc":{"d":{}},"dd":{"d":{}}}

var paths = _.paths(cherry);

console.log(paths);
// ["cc.d", "dd.d"]

paths = _.paths(cherry,{pathFormat:'array'});

console.log(JSON.stringify(paths));
// [["cc","d"],["dd","d"]]

var index = _.indexate(cherry);

console.log(JSON.stringify(index));
// {"cc.d":{},"dd.d":{}}

Here is a Codepen demo

  • I got a maximum call stack exceeded error using this trying to search for a property on the window object. – Helzgate Aug 6 at 20:14
  • Did you turn circular check option on? It's off by default. Share your code and I will help to fix it. – Yuri Gor Aug 6 at 21:02
  • when I try to use var cherry = _.pickDeep( window, 'Netscape', {checkCircular: true}); I get the error: TypeError: Right-hand side of 'instanceof' is not an object – Helzgate Aug 7 at 0:12
  • I have no Netscape browser for testing, but this works in the chrome: (function(){ var ld = window._; window._ = null; var cherry = ld.pickDeep( window, 'Netscape', {checkCircular: true}); console.log({cherry}); })(); Something weird happen when deepdash tries to iterate over global lodash object it depends on, so move it to some local scope. – Yuri Gor Aug 7 at 12:04
  • I get the exact same error. It also wipes out my local storage for my app every single time too which is weird. I ran this: (function(){ var ld = _; deepdash(ld); _ = null; var cherry = ld.pickDeep( window, 'Netscape', {checkCircular: true}); console.log({cherry}); })(); – Helzgate Aug 7 at 12:39
0
Array.prototype.findpath = function(item,path) {
  return this.find(function(f){return item==eval('f.'+path)});
}
  • 4
    You should avoid "code-only" answers. Please give a little context about your code. – croxy Nov 17 '16 at 16:05
0

Here's how I did it:

function _find( obj, field, results )
{
    var tokens = field.split( '.' );

    // if this is an array, recursively call for each row in the array
    if( obj instanceof Array )
    {
        obj.forEach( function( row )
        {
            _find( row, field, results );
        } );
    }
    else
    {
        // if obj contains the field
        if( obj[ tokens[ 0 ] ] !== undefined )
        {
            // if we're at the end of the dot path
            if( tokens.length === 1 )
            {
                results.push( obj[ tokens[ 0 ] ] );
            }
            else
            {
                // keep going down the dot path
                _find( obj[ tokens[ 0 ] ], field.substr( field.indexOf( '.' ) + 1 ), results );
            }
        }
    }
}

Testing it with:

var obj = {
    document: {
        payload: {
            items:[
                {field1: 123},
                {field1: 456}
                ]
        }
    }
};
var results = [];

_find(obj.document,'payload.items.field1', results);
console.log(results);

Outputs

[ 123, 456 ]

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