316

I have very simple problem that I can't solve. I need to do something like this:

select distinct * from (1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6).

Anybody can help??

Edit

The data comes as a text file from one of our clients. It's totally unformatted (it's a single, very long line of text), but it may be possible to do so in Excel. But it's not practical for me, because I will need to use these values in my sql query. It's not convenient to do so every time I need to run a query.

4
  • do you want to select from multiple tables or select from a single table but having a specific values to select? some thing like specific id's alone Oct 14, 2009 at 8:22
  • Not what you ask, but you can do it in another language. For example in PowerShell, you can do $d = (1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6) | sort -Unique to get the distinct values in an array $d. Easy to extend to a file-to-file tool. Dec 11, 2017 at 10:42
  • Is the important thing here to get a distinct list of those values, or to get that list of values into SQL? As @JeppeStigNielsen says, there are other ways to get distinct values from a text list that doesn't involve SQL. I came here looking for how to get a list of values into an SQL script that references other tables.
    – Rikki
    Dec 10, 2018 at 23:53
  • the VALUES ( (1), (2), (3) ) AS X(Value) is the correct answer, please update it
    – DATEx2
    Oct 27, 2020 at 10:24

16 Answers 16

596

Available only on SQL Server 2008 and over is row-constructor in this form:
You could use

SELECT DISTINCT *
FROM (
  VALUES (1), (1), (1), (2), (5), (1), (6)
) AS X(a)

For more information see:

4
  • 105
    Side-note: X is alias for table name and a is alias for column name ;).
    – shA.t
    Dec 26, 2015 at 7:19
  • 23
    This is the more correct answer compared to the one currently selected Mar 8, 2017 at 18:38
  • 1
    This is the most generic way, I was spoiled by unnest(ARRAY[]) in pgsql and now banging head to make FROM accept minor values as row records in sqlserver, and here it is. Happy to know.
    – Ben
    Oct 23, 2017 at 9:49
  • 2
    Better answer due to column and table alias
    – Alfredo A.
    May 2, 2018 at 15:13
138

In general :

SELECT 
  DISTINCT 
      FieldName1, FieldName2, ..., FieldNameN
FROM
  (
    Values
        ( ValueForField1, ValueForField2,..., ValueForFieldN ),
        ( ValueForField1, ValueForField2,..., ValueForFieldN ),
        ( ValueForField1, ValueForField2,..., ValueForFieldN ),
        ( ValueForField1, ValueForField2,..., ValueForFieldN ),
        ( ValueForField1, ValueForField2,..., ValueForFieldN )
  ) AS TempTableName ( FieldName1, FieldName2, ..., FieldNameN )

In your case :

Select 
  distinct
  TempTableName.Field1 
From 
  (
  VALUES
    (1), 
    (1), 
    (1), 
    (2), 
    (5), 
    (1), 
    (6)
  ) AS TempTableName (Field1)
2
  • 1
    I know "select *" is considered bad form, but is there any reason not to use select * in this case? Because that duplication of FieldName1, FieldName2, ..., FieldNameN is grotesque.
    – Pxtl
    Jun 26, 2020 at 19:10
  • @Pxtl There is no reason to not use "Select *". I have rewritten those field's names to be more clear. Also, you does not maybe need "Distinct" keyword . Jun 29, 2020 at 12:39
103

Simplest way to get the distinct values of a long list of comma delimited text would be to use a find an replace with UNION to get the distinct values.

SELECT 1
UNION SELECT 1
UNION SELECT 1
UNION SELECT 2
UNION SELECT 5
UNION SELECT 1
UNION SELECT 6

Applied to your long line of comma delimited text

  • Find and replace every comma with UNION SELECT
  • Add a SELECT in front of the statement

You now should have a working query

10
  • 8
    no, no, I have a list of several hundreds of values, manually it would be torture
    – Eedoh
    Oct 14, 2009 at 8:29
  • where does that list come from? It might be way easier to just copy /paste that list in Excel and extract the distinct values there using a simple crosstab. Oct 14, 2009 at 8:30
  • 1
    btw, find and replace might also take you a long way. Replace every comma with union select, add a select in front and you should have a working query cfr the union I showed. Oct 14, 2009 at 8:35
  • 2
    this stuff with replacing commas with select union works like a charm Thanks a lot :)
    – Eedoh
    Oct 14, 2009 at 8:41
  • 5
    For performance reasons, I'd recommend Union-All, then Group-By or use Distinct in your outer select.
    – MikeTeeVee
    May 12, 2014 at 20:39
46

Have you tried using the following syntax?

select * from (values (1), (2), (3), (4), (5)) numbers(number)
1
  • 6
    an anonymous user suggested to edit the code to: SELECT DISTINCT table_name.column_name FROM (VALUES (1), (2), (3)) AS table_name(column_name)
    – Vogel612
    Oct 22, 2015 at 10:25
22

If you want to select only certain values from a single table you can try this

select distinct(*) from table_name where table_field in (1,1,2,3,4,5)

eg:

select first_name,phone_number from telephone_list where district id in (1,2,5,7,8,9)

if you want to select from multiple tables then you must go for UNION.

If you just want to select the values 1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6 then you must do this

select 1 
union select 1 
union select 1 
union select 2 
union select 5 
union select 1 
union select 6
2
  • 1
    I don't need to select from a table, but from this list of values (in brackets). That's the main problem (selecting from comma separated array of values, not from a table)
    – Eedoh
    Oct 14, 2009 at 8:31
  • that case, like we have DUAL table in Oracle, you can make use of the same. But since there is no DUAL then you will have to go the union way. You can try another method, as you mentioned you have comma separated array of values, why don't you insert them to a table and then use a neat sql select query, instead of using so many sql unions. Oct 14, 2009 at 8:35
19

PostgreSQL gives you 2 ways of doing this:

SELECT DISTINCT * FROM (VALUES('a'),('b'),('a'),('v')) AS tbl(col1)

or

SELECT DISTINCT * FROM (select unnest(array['a','b', 'a','v'])) AS tbl(col1)

using array approach you can also do something like this:

SELECT DISTINCT * FROM (select unnest(string_to_array('a;b;c;d;e;f;a;b;d', ';'))) AS tbl(col1)
2
  • 11
    Although the question does specify MSSQL... :)
    – halfer
    Aug 1, 2012 at 20:20
  • @halfer The first answer given here worked for me, using MSSQL 2016 while the other answers didn't. 7 years later
    – dustytrash
    Sep 9, 2019 at 13:48
9

I know this is a pretty old thread, but I was searching for something similar and came up with this.

Given that you had a comma-separated string, you could use string_split

select distinct value from string_split('1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6',',')

This should return

1
2
5
6

String split takes two parameters, the string input, and the separator character.

you can add an optional where statement using value as the column name

select distinct value from string_split('1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6',',')
where value > 1

produces

2
5
6
3
  • This seems to require MSSQL 2016 or later: learn.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/functions/…
    – Jonathan
    Mar 13, 2019 at 14:28
  • 1
    @Sam Yes, this is SQL Server, per the original question's tags
    – NapkinBob
    Apr 22, 2019 at 22:31
  • 3
    @Jonathan Yes, given the age of the question, It wouldn't have helped the original poster, but I figured someone might stumble upon it, as I did, and find it helpful.
    – NapkinBob
    Apr 22, 2019 at 22:32
8

This works on SQL Server 2005 and if there is maximal number:

SELECT * 
FROM
  (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY a.id) NUMBER
  FROM syscomments a
  CROSS JOIN syscomments b) c
WHERE c.NUMBER IN (1,4,6,7,9)
3
  • 2
    +1 neat but it is limited to the amount of rows in syscomments cross joined with itself. In my case to 294849. (and you forgot distinct.) Oct 14, 2009 at 8:40
  • You can cross join once more, but replacing commas is much faster solution.
    – LukLed
    Oct 14, 2009 at 9:08
  • Yeah, this way is good also, but I prefer Lieven's solution, because of simplicity.
    – Eedoh
    Oct 14, 2009 at 10:41
3

Using GROUP BY gives you better performance than DISTINCT:

SELECT *
FROM
(
    VALUES
        (1),
        (1),
        (1),
        (2),
        (5),
        (1),
        (6)
) AS A (nums)
GROUP BY A.nums;
2

If you need an array, separate the array columns with a comma:

SELECT * FROM (VALUES('WOMENS'),('MENS'),('CHILDRENS')) as X([Attribute])
,(VALUES(742),(318)) AS z([StoreID])
0

Another way that you can use is a query like this:

SELECT DISTINCT
    LTRIM(m.n.value('.[1]','varchar(8000)')) as columnName
FROM 
    (SELECT CAST('<XMLRoot><RowData>' + REPLACE(t.val,',','</RowData><RowData>') + '</RowData></XMLRoot>' AS XML) AS x
     FROM (SELECT '1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6') AS t(val)
    ) dt
  CROSS APPLY 
    x.nodes('/XMLRoot/RowData') m(n);
0

Select user id from list of user id:

SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE user_id IN (1,3,5,7,9,4);
0

If it is a list of parameters from existing SQL table, for example ID list from existing Table1, then you can try this:

select distinct ID
      FROM Table1
      where 
      ID in (1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6)
ORDER BY ID;

Or, if you need List of parameters as a SQL Table constant(variable), try this:

WITH Id_list AS (
     select ID
      FROM Table1
      where 
      ID in (1, 1, 1, 2, 5, 1, 6)
)
SELECT distinct * FROM Id_list
ORDER BY ID;
0

I create a function on most SQL DB I work on to do just this.

CREATE OR ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[UTIL_SplitList](@parList Varchar(MAX),@splitChar Varchar(1)=',') 
  Returns @t table (Column_Value varchar(MAX))
  as
  Begin
    Declare @pos integer 
    set @pos = CharIndex(@splitChar, @parList)
    while @pos > 0
    Begin
      Insert Into @t (Column_Value) VALUES (Left(@parList, @pos-1))
      set @parList = Right(@parList, Len(@parList) - @pos)
      set @pos = CharIndex(@splitChar, @parList)
    End
    Insert Into @t (Column_Value) VALUES (@parList)
    Return
  End

Once the function exists, it is as easy as

SELECT DISTINCT 
    *
FROM 
    [dbo].[UTIL_SplitList]('1,1,1,2,5,1,6',',') 
-3

A technique that has worked for me is to query a table that you know has a large amount of records in it, including just the Row_Number field in your result

Select Top 10000 Row_Number() OVER (Order by fieldintable) As 'recnum' From largetable

will return a result set of 10000 records from 1 to 10000, use this within another query to give you the desired results

-6

Use the SQL In function

Something like this:

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE:
"VALUE" In (1,2,3,7,90,500)

Works a treat in ArcGIS

1
  • 1
    This SELECT generates a syntax error with SQL Server.
    – JohnH
    Jan 3, 2018 at 19:55

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