113

When I unlist a list of dates it turns them back into numeric. Is that normal? Any workaround other than re-applying as.Date?

> dd <- as.Date(c("2013-01-01", "2013-02-01", "2013-03-01"))
> class(dd)
[1] "Date"
> unlist(dd)
[1] "2013-01-01" "2013-02-01" "2013-03-01"
> list(dd)
[[1]]
[1] "2013-01-01" "2013-02-01" "2013-03-01"

> unlist(list(dd))
[1] 15706 15737 15765

Is this a bug?

13
  • 3
    From ?unlist: Where possible the list elements are coerced to a common mode during the unlisting, and so the result often ends up as a character vector. Vectors will be coerced to the highest type of the components in the hierarchy NULL < raw < logical < integer < real < complex < character < list < expression: pairlists are treated as lists.
    – Arun
    Mar 27, 2013 at 13:18
  • 7
    yep I did read the manual.... they're already in a common mode Mar 27, 2013 at 13:19
  • 2
    okay - I guess I have to read through reams of quirky behaviour documentation for each function that I use. Mar 27, 2013 at 13:26
  • 10
    @Arun I don't see why that's relevant. Date vectors are internally integers so the problem really is that attributes are stripped. The documentation doesn't mention this explicitly, but there's no way unlist could preserve attributes in general.
    – hadley
    Mar 27, 2013 at 13:32
  • 2
    @Arun yes, because unlist returns non-list inputs unchanged. It doesn't seem at all blurry to me, but the documentation should mention what happens to attributes.
    – hadley
    Mar 27, 2013 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

120

do.call is a handy function to "do something" with a list. In our case, concatenate it using c. It's not uncommon to cbind or rbind data.frames from a list into a single big data.frame.

What we're doing here is actually concatenating elements of the dd list. This would be analogous to c(dd[[1]], dd[[2]]). Note that c can be supplied as a function or as a character.

> dd <- list(dd, dd)
> (d <- do.call("c", dd))
[1] "2013-01-01" "2013-02-01" "2013-03-01" "2013-01-01" "2013-02-01" "2013-03-01"
> class(d) # proof that class is still Date
[1] "Date"
7
  • 9
    This answer would be greatly improved if you could add a little more detail explaining what you are doing, so others will find it more readable later.
    – Dinre
    Mar 27, 2013 at 13:21
  • 3
    @AlessandroJacopson the quote is not necessary (although see help file of do.call) but can sometimes be handy for functions which need to be quoted, e.g. do.call("+", as.list(c(1, 1))). Sep 14, 2017 at 12:26
  • 2
    another nice approach is to perform the conversion from list to vector with Reduce, i.e Reduce("c",dd)
    – Oriol Prat
    Jul 9, 2018 at 11:32
  • 2
    @OriolPrat, that calls Reduce n-1 times, where n is the length of the list. This will perform horribly with larger vectors, analogous (actually, identically) to why building a list/vector iteratively is a poor performer.
    – r2evans
    Aug 17, 2018 at 18:51
  • 9
    Thanks for the code. Doesn't answer the question, tho: why does unlist kill dates?
    – dfrankow
    Mar 24, 2020 at 17:34
23

Using base R

dd <- list(as.Date(c("2013-01-01", "2013-02-01", "2013-03-01")))

You could use do.call():

dd |> do.call(what = c)

Or Reduce():

dd |> Reduce(f = c)

Using purrr

The popular package purrr also provides convenient functions to flatten a list to a vector preserving types.

Most prominently, list_c():

dd |> purrr::list_c(ptype = vctrs::new_date())

Or alternatively, reduce():

dd |> purrr::reduce(c)

Evaluation

All of the above calls result in a vector of dates:

 Date[1:3], format: "2013-01-01" "2013-02-01" "2013-03-01"

But performance-wise, there are differences. Base R functions are clearly faster on such a small dataset:

bench::mark(do.call = do.call(c, dd),
            Reduce = Reduce(c, dd),
            `purrr::list_c` = purrr::list_c(dd, ptype = vctrs::new_date()),
            `purrr::reduce` = purrr::reduce(dd, c))
# A tibble: 4 × 13
  expression         min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec` n_itr  n_gc total_time result
  <bch:expr>    <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl> <int> <dbl>   <bch:tm> <list>
1 do.call         5.38µs   6.83µs   135601.        0B     40.7  9997     3     73.7ms <date>
2 Reduce          1.69µs   2.18µs   399913.        0B     40.0  9999     1       25ms <date>
3 purrr::list_c  22.92µs   28.3µs    33846.    49.9KB     37.3  9989    11    295.1ms <date>
4 purrr::reduce   58.1µs  69.34µs    13427.   236.2KB     27.7  6312    13    470.1ms <date>
# ℹ 3 more variables: memory <list>, time <list>, gc <list>

With a more representative sample of 99999 dates, the purrr functions catch up, but still don't come near Reduce(). do.call() on the other hand falls behind:

l <- list(rep(as.Date(c("2013-01-01", "2013-02-01", "2013-03-01")), times = 33333))

bench::mark(do.call = do.call(c, l),
            Reduce = Reduce(c, l),
            `purrr::list_c` = purrr::list_c(l, ptype = vctrs::new_date()),
            `purrr::reduce` = purrr::reduce(l, c))
# A tibble: 4 × 13
  expression         min   median `itr/sec` mem_alloc `gc/sec` n_itr  n_gc total_time result
  <bch:expr>    <bch:tm> <bch:tm>     <dbl> <bch:byt>    <dbl> <int> <dbl>   <bch:tm> <list>
1 do.call       562.13µs 641.19µs     1387.    3.05MB     84.2   280    17    201.9ms <date>
2 Reduce          1.67µs   1.88µs   494861.        0B      0   10000     0     20.2ms <date>
3 purrr::list_c  97.73µs 142.73µs     5492.  781.29KB     81.4  1957    29    356.3ms <date>
4 purrr::reduce  57.39µs  69.46µs    12696.        0B     12.4  6156     6    484.9ms <date>
# ℹ 3 more variables: memory <list>, time <list>, gc <list>
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  • 1
    This is brilliant!
    – Soldalma
    Aug 2, 2021 at 16:47
  • 1
    This calls c "length minus one" times, so it works just fine being called twice vice once, but if you have a long list this might be demonstrably slower (mostly due to re-allocation, not due to c itself).
    – r2evans
    Jun 22, 2023 at 19:43
  • @r2evans: I've added benchmarks, so people can judge for themselves :)
    – Salim B
    Jun 23, 2023 at 12:39
  • (1) Benchmarks with a length of 3 is overwhelmed by other overhead. I tested with length 1000. (2) You never define l. If l <- list(dd) (using the original dd vector), then indeed Reduce is faster, suggesting do.call has overhead (which is surprising to me). If l <- as.list(dd) (which may be used when derived programmatically in other ways), then do.call wins. So my comment stands, but definitely based on assumptions on your incomplete code.
    – r2evans
    Jun 23, 2023 at 12:52
  • Thanks, you're right, I've updated the benchmarks. The differing performance implications of list(dd) vs. as.list(dd) I can confirm, but I didn't include this info above.
    – Salim B
    Jun 24, 2023 at 15:10

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