3

This is my first time working with va_list and stuff so I don't really know what I'm doing. Okay basically what I have is a bunch of numbers (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) in the function ordered and I get them to print out. This works fine.

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdarg>

using namespace std;

void ordered(int num1, double list ...);

void main()
{ 
    ordered(5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0);
}

void ordered(int num1, double list ...)
{
    va_list arguments;

    va_start(arguments, num1);

    list = va_arg(arguments, double);
    cout << "There are " << num1 << " numbers" << endl;

    do { 
        cout << list << endl; // prints out 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 then 5
        list = va_arg(arguments, double);
    } while (list != 0);

    // at this point, list = 0

    va_end(arguments);
}

the problem is, after the va_end(arguments); or before it, I would like to get the program to print out my list a second time; basically print out 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 once more, without making another function. I tried to duplicate the code:

va_start(arguments, num1);

do { 
    cout << list << endl;
    list = va_arg(arguments, double);
} while (list != 0);

va_end(arguments);

without success. How can the program to repeat list once more, or is it not possible to do it again in the same function?

5
  • 1
    Good question actually, but i guess you also have to repeat the va_start and va_end part also.
    – RedX
    Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:21
  • I tried that but it didn't work :( alright i just edited the code to show that
    – im dumb
    Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:24
  • I don't think the signature of the function is right. void ordered(int x, double y...) means void ordered(int x, double y, ...). That is, the varargs is not a sequence of double, but a sequence of unknown types that comes after a double argument. At the same time this means that your implementation is incorrect (drops the second argument to the function) Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:32
  • Have you considered variadic templates instead which is type-safe compared to va_arg etc... stackoverflow.com/questions/276188/variadic-templates Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:44
  • this is actually a homework assignment, gotta follow specific instructions :P
    – im dumb
    Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

5

Here is a working implementation:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdarg>

using namespace std;

void ordered(int num1, ...); // notice changed signature


int main(int,char**)
{ 
    ordered(5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0);
    return 0;
}

void ordered(int count, ...) // notice changed signature
{
    va_list arguments;

    va_start(arguments, count);

    cout << "There are " << count << " numbers" << endl;

    double value = 0.0;

    // notice how the loop changed
    for(int i = 0; i < count; ++i) { 
        value = va_arg(arguments, double); 
        cout << value << endl; // prints out 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 then 5
    } 

    // at this point, list = 0

    va_end(arguments);

    va_list arg2;
    va_start(arg2, count);

    cout << "There are " << count << " numbers" << endl;

    for(int i = 0; i < count; ++i) { 
        value = va_arg(arg2, double);
        cout << value << endl; // prints out 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 then 5
    } 

    // at this point, list = 0

    va_end(arg2);

}
3
  • This does not tackle the question. He seems to be interested in printing the sequence again after the first pass. Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:35
  • 1
    @DavidRodríguez-dribeas Don't forget to scroll.
    – RedX
    Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:39
  • @RedX: Sorry, missed that part. Commented Mar 27, 2013 at 13:43
3

From the man page:

va_end()

Each invocation of va_start() must be matched by a corresponding invocation of va_end() in the same function. After the call va_end(ap) the variable ap is undefined.

Multiple traversals of the list, each bracketed by va_start() and va_end() are possible.

Could you show the code where you tried that but it didn't work?

NB. See also va_copy, with which you can make a duplicate of arguments before (destructively) traversing it, and then also traverse the duplicate.

1

The simple answer (ignoring how varargs really works, I find it hard to find a valid use case outside of printf) is to copy the arguments yourself. Well, actually a simpler answer would be not to use varargs at all... Why are you not passing a container (or in C++11 using an initializer_list?)

3
  • And of course, even for printf, with C++11 variadic templates there's hardly any justification to using varargs... Commented Mar 28, 2013 at 7:03
  • @MatthieuM. I have not seen any implementation I like of printf without variadic args... Well, really I have not seen many implementations either. But currently the best candidate is a variadic args wrapper around printf that does the type checking and then forwards to the real printf, giving both the type safety of variadic templates and the performance of printf (in release mode the type tests can be #ifdef-ed out) Commented Mar 28, 2013 at 12:15
  • There is little benefit to that, given that compilers have specific checks for it. I think the main issue is that nobody really gave a thought to it; and personally if I went into recoding printf, I would probably take the opportunity to update the format string in order to cater to objects as well as plain data types (which is one of printf main flaws). Commented Mar 28, 2013 at 12:35

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